My Life as a Pivot

My Life as a Pivot

 

I am pivoted from one location, to another. I turn, and move suddenly to a new route. I change. 

May is the month of graduation ceremonies.  Nearly 3 decades ago, I walked down the aisle in my cap and gown to receive my third, and final, degree.  The formal procession marked the end of 9 years of diligent work in which I earned 3 university degrees at 2 different universities, in 2 different states.  Of course, I was happy to reach the lofty educational goals I set.  But, even so, I had a strange sense of loss because I was leaving the environment of being a student in the myriad of classrooms over those years. I loved being a student. When that final diploma was in my hand, I knew I stood at a fork in the road. This achievement meant that I had reached dividing point between my student-centered life of studies and my new academic life as a professional educator.

 

When students begin to pursue the academic goals that lead to a college degree, they decide to embrace a future-centered environment that will involve them in life-long learning.

I eventually understood that even as a first semester freshmen, a university student is already a professional. It is the decision to begin this journey that propels a student into a professional. It is the decision that marks the change and not the receipt of the final degree.  The final graduation ceremony was the turning point for me because it signified a momentous modification in direction. I mourned the loss of being in a classroom, as a student, for many years. Honestly, I wanted to be a student forever.

On reflection of those years, I can say I wrote more research papers than I can remember. Writing and researching various topics in my fields of fine arts and humanities motivated me and urged me onward in pursuit of wisdom.

I thrived on doing research at the library; searching through the pages of various periodicals or books was a passion.

In the process of writing papers, I discovered new research.  I felt like an archaeologist digging in a multi-layered excavation site. Every page I turned just might lead to a new discovery.  New discoveries revealed a new set of questions and new paths to pursue.

We often find hidden pathways and ancient passages in the debris and dust we gather as we write our papers. There is always something that compels us to explore.  Dig deeper. In the course of researching and writing papers, I experienced the unexpected or unknown.  It is in these pivots of our life that we encounter our true self as we continually ask:

“What if?”  “Now what?” “Where will this lead me?”  “What is this world view?”

Miriam Webster’s Dictionary reveals that a pivot can be a noun or a verb. Yes, I can see it both ways but when I think of this word, pivot, I feel like an action is taking place. This word indicates a movement, to me. Research brings me to new information. New conclusions.

 

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Visit the  WELCOME PAGE to learn more about Lynda McKinney Lambert. activities and career.

Lynda McKinney Lambert lives and writes in the Village of Wurtemburg, in Western Pennsylvania.  Her articles and poems appear on a number of blogs, as well as Literary Magazines and books.

View Publications Page for her most recent updates.

Discover Lynda’s other blog, Walking by Inner Vision.

 

Check out Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

Copyright 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

“Thanks for rejoicing with me today.  Isn’t God so wonderful!”

Romans 8:28

 

 

 

Guest Post: Ida Matilda’s Cream Pitcher

Enjoy this guest blog that appeared today on Abbie’s Corner of the World. Thank you, Abbie, for reading my poem for the blogging world to enjoy, too.
I truly appreciate this beautiful blog and am so glad to share it here on SCANdalous-Recollections today.

Abbie's Corner of the World

Today, I’m pleased to have Lynda McKinney Lambert as a guest. She’s the author of Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage (Kota Press, 2003) and Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems. (DLD Books, 2017) She’s also an artist and teacher who suddenly lost her eyesight ten years ago. You can read reviews of Walking by Inner Vision on my blog and on the Vision Aware site. Here’s one of her poems, which you can also read on her blog. It’s about her grandmother’s cream pitcher, a photo of which is below.

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Ida Matilda’s Cream Pitcher

by Lynda McKinney Lambert, 2017

I loved to spend endless, languid

days at Grandma’s house, sitting

around her plentiful kitchen table. Ida

Matilda’s raisin-filled cookies, sprinkled with

granulated sugar,

apple pies and yeast breads served hot from her oven

tart cherry desserts and homemade blackberry jam.

I poured heavy cream this morning…

View original post 261 more words

Solitude

When from our better selves we have too long
Been parted by the hurrying world, and droop,
Sick of its business, of its pleasures tired,
How gracious, how benign is Solitude!  

—Hermit

 

I arrived at the Hambidge Center  in Rabun Gap, GA in the summer of 1988. It was late at night.  In the darkness, I drove into the driveway after my long journey from western Pennsylvania. I walked  to the main house where I met the manager  who would take me to where I would live  for the next month. I was going to be doing a Residency  and would be given a studio and place to live where I could do my art every day.  It was a great opportunity and a dream come true for me.

My guide  said, “I hope you like isolation.” My reply was, “Oh, yes! I love isolation.” The fact is, I did not have an inkling what isolation was but it sounded good to me.

Of course, I had no idea what isolation truly was for I had just arrived at this isolated art colony deep in the Georgia mountains. My normal life was back in Pennsylvania where I managed my busy home and family.  I cooked meals from scratch every day for my husband and 5 children. My homemade pies were famous among the ladies at my church.   The first thing I did each morning was 3 loads of Laundry.  In between the layers of  the business of taking care of husband, kids, dogs, cats, and anything else that came up, I was a non-traditional student pursuing the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree.  Every spare moment I could find, I painted.  Painting was my obsession.

Driving up the steep mountain road, I followed his car.  Then we turned onto a pathway to the isolated little house where I would be living and working.  After the man left me there, alone, in the middle of the Blue Ridge Mountains – in utter darkness – I began to get an idea of what solitude would be like. While I was excited to be there, to have this opportunity, I was also stuck with the reality (and fear) of solitude.

My life was changing. I was diagnosed with breast cancer just 2 months before this trip.  And, my father died 2 weeks before the day I found myself alone at night in a strange place where I would live for the next month. My nerves were a frazzle.

 

But, the month I spent there, away from everyone and everything that was my normal life  was one of the most productive times in my creative life.  In this mountain solitude,  I was united with my “better self.”  Twenty-nine years later, I remain at peace  and solidly united with my “better self.”

Article and Photography by Lunda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright, May 16, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Lynda  McKinney Lambert

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Blogger:

Author:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage (Kota Press), 2002.

   

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017 

Lynda is a Peer Adviser  and writes articles on sight loss and blindness for  Vision Aware Blog

CONTACT ME: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 Author – Blogger – Visual Artist