3.2.1. Quote Me Challenge

Thursday, August 9, 2018

Post #116

Thank you, Joan Myles

Website: http://jewniquelymyself.com

for inviting me to join the3.2.1. Quote Me Challenge

Note:  I created two new commentaries on the topic of Discovery for this challenge.

 

 

Quote #1

Disruption – Discovery – Recovery

My non-linear right brain worked overtime for the past few days as I thought  about the theme for this challenge.  I think that Discovery is a journey which brings friends along with it for company. Discovery can be a lonely path at times because we have research and self-searching to do. Overall, we have fellow travelers on the path that we meet up with from time to time. Our travels bring satisfaction and new discoveries. We grow.

 

My Visual Artist’s mind asked,

 

 “How can I write about this theme? What is it, exactly? Is it a noun? A verb? What will I do with this word? I need pictures! I see the world in visual images – iconography, imagery, pictures.  Even with the profound sight loss I have, I still see everything in pictures – images.  Everything in my world is created in pictorial dimensions. I sift through everything I encounter through visual measurements and signifiers.” 

 

Each time my thoughts turned to Discovery, two other words are standing right there beside the idea, Discovery. I looked away, tried to clear my mind.  No, it is just one word that I want to explore. But, no! The other two words remained fixed in a defiant stance.  I gazed in frustration through my blurry eyes at this trio.  Ah, triplets. That is what I see.

 

“It’s getting too complicated. I’ll have to turn them into an equation to figure out this problem. But an equation is a left brain activity,” I complained.

 

The trio in my mind looks like this:

 

Disruption = Discovery + Recovery

Or, consider it this way:

Disruption + Discovery= Recovery

 

Are you feeling like I am over-thinking my response to the word, Discovery?

 

Initially, my intuition softly nudged me to consider a partnership between the 2 words, Discovery and Recovery.  “Perhaps, they might be a pair?” I asked.

Discovery and Recovery might be twin sisters. Each, a mirror image of the other? Can one exist apart from the other?

 

Soon, I realized that Discovery and Recovery must first have a push of some sort, so they could work together. They need something else to drive them into action. What could give them the get-up-and-go they needed?  At this point, I realized there must be a prime mover to get them started – and that would be Disruption!  Disruption is the prime mover, the impetus for the actions that bring us to the discovery of new ideas, ways of thinking, new creations.  Disruption and Discovery bring us to a healing place of Recovery.

 

Some days nothing seems to go as planned.  Unexpected challenges can come on us with no warning. We can get turned around and even lost at times.

 

Discovery and Recovery are necessary elements of creativity.  The art-making process requires a great deal of discovery during the process of creating something new.  In order to make discoveries we must take action of some sort to begin to discover content.

 

For example, in creating a drawing, a blank piece of paper is what we begin with.

The blank piece of paper has no content as we observe it on the desk.  But, we pick up a pencil or crayon and put a mark of any kind on that paper and instantly we have content. Just a dot or a comma or a swirl or a slash – it is content.  In destroying the pristine surface of the blank page, content arrives and there is a moment of discovery as we apprehend what has transpired.

 

Mark-making changes everything.

 

The combination of the plain sheet of paper, plus the marks drawn on it have brought new possibilities. Disrupting the surface of the paper developed new nformation and a different point of view.

 

Discovery comes through disruption or tearing apart of what existed.

Once there is a disturbance or a destruction, then the recovery process can begin.

 

As I worked on this theme, I discovered my own history.  When I lost my sight nearly eleven years ago, it was a major Disruption.  I can say it has taken me all this time – eleven years – to realize that the Discoveries I’ve been making through this experience have brought me to a new place in my life.  In just the past few months, over the course of this summer, I am developing a new awareness of what makes me satisfied and what brings me peace.  Through Disruption of the world as I knew it, I’ve made Discoveries that I could never have known about. Renewal has entered into my life and I am learning how to bloom where I am planted, at last.

__________

 

 

Quote #2:

Creating a Lesson Plan

 

For those who work in higher education, August is an intense month dedicated to  preparations for the upcoming first semester of a new school year. In my own recollections, August was a pivot month; it shifts from summer holidays and relaxation to a month of dedicated research, discovery, course development and creation  of the syllabus.

 

On the first day of a new semester, professors give each student a syllabus that outlines the entire course. Students will read the syllabus which contains  information they will need for successfully completing the course in the next fifteen  weeks. My syllabi were detailed so that students clearly understood what my expectations were for the course.

 

Professors write  a new syllabus for each of the courses.  I enjoyed this tedious job very much. It was like creating a work of art. You begin with nothing – a blank slate – Everyting is possible at this point.

You add a bit here and a piece  of something else there; as you continue your own reading and researching, you keep adding information that you want to cover with your students.  But, it is a tricky business, this syllabus. It is a challenge that is much like creating a painting or writing a score of music.

 

The most difficult part of this job is to look at the broad array of information available, and sift through it all to decide what you will include and what you will discard. After all your research and shifting of ideas, the course eventually materializes and you are set to go.

 

When August comes, I think about how the students will be back in the classroom

I’m retired now. Yet,  I stop to think about the intense research I did for each course I presented.  The research led to new discoveries no matter how many years I taught the course. There were always new facts and new revelations in the Humanities field. It was always exciting and ever-changing.

 

I’ve always  thrived on change and challenges.

Discoveries can bring changes. Some are positive and exciting.

I believe each new day in our life can bring discoveries that enrich us if we look for them.

We may not score a perfect “A” for each of our projects, but we can pick up where we left off and begin again.

Let’s let our  new discoveries guide us and enrich us as we continue on the course of life.

 

__________

Three lovely people I ask to accept the challenge are:

EC at  http://Yecheilyah Ysrayl <yecheilyah@yecheilyahysrayl.com>

Beckie Ann at

Beckie Ann Horter | This Abiding Walk

 

Amy  at  https://amybovaird.com/
 

The word I offer for your consideration is: Flight.

Can’t wait to get your take!

These are the rules I was given:

 

*              Thank the person who invited you & share their website link

*              Post 2 quotes for the dedicated topic of the day – Discovery (for Lynda’s challenge)

*              Select 3 bloggers to take part in ‘3.2.1 Quote Me Challenge’

*              And give them a topic/word – Flight

 

There is no specific deadline, although it says topic of the day, and one can choose to answer whenever one wishes.

The word I chose for my 3 invited guests is FLIGHT.

__________

This 3.2.1. Quote Me Challenge essay is brought to you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems being published.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

 

This blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright August 9, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

Please RE_BLOG or SHARE on SOCIAL MEDIA.

Keep the HAPPINESS GOING.

 

6 thoughts on “3.2.1. Quote Me Challenge

  1. Patty, yes, indeed, we are all waiting to read your 3.2.1. Quote Me Challenge response. I am waiting to read it – I know it will be good! Thank you for your work with all of us who are writers and authors, Patty. I have learned so much from your generosity.

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  2. Alice, I admit that I do miss writing the syllabi every summer. I loved the whole process of research, discovery, and creation of a course. I miss that. I really took it seriously and I know you would also. Some profs barely gave students a page for the semester – but I think the students really wanted to know exactly what is expected of them from the first day of class. I was also the “Queen of Handouts.” I created beautifully designed handouts for every class they came to – often many handouts – for students who wanted to dig deeper than what we could cover in a period in class. Thank for your comment.

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  3. Lynda–Oh, yes, ’tis the season of Syllabi!  Each summer, I liked to work on my syllabi earlier in the summer so that I could have a little break while my master copies were at the bindery to be printed in selected pastel colors.  With this schedule, I enjoyed having a little break between writing the syllabi and introducing the fourteen- or sixteen-page document to my students on the first day of the fall semester.  Although we may be retired, I think our life calendar continues to revolve around semesters, semester breaks, and summer vacation.

    Enjoy your new endeavor!  Alice

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Reblogged this on Campbells World and commented:
    OK.
    Joan has done her post. Lynda has done hers, now I must do mine.
    I promise promise to do it before the weekend is up.
    I must make the “discovery” of more time.
    🙂
    Great job Lynda.

    Liked by 1 person

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