Friday Favs – Aloe Vera: Winter Delights

Post 151

11 January 2019

 

Friday Favs: Aloe Vera: Winter Delights

 

I often begin my morning by checking

the daily issue of the Old Farmer’s Almanac –

I receive a Newsletter which  comes silently

each day

in my mailbox.

First,

I check the front page for the poem of the day.  The featured poem, or fragment of a poem or proverb or quote always has a beautiful photograph or art work that goes with it.  To see a photo with some creative text is  inspiring to me.   Do you enjoy seeing an artistic image with a poem?  I think it is a WIN-WIN when there are TWO CREATIVE WORKS side-by-side.

How do YOU feel about that?

I think of  a POEM PLUS PHOTO  as a

MARRIAGE MADE IN HEAVEN.

Word + Image = ART!

Below: Photo by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

succulents_1

Today –

I spotted some photos of  a type of succulent plant that I love.

I bought my first Aloe Vera about twenty years ago at a rare plant store in Georgia. We were visiting our daughter who lived in Georgia at that time.

The Rare Plant store  was a thrill for us to find.  I never was in such a  a store that sold rare plants – we purchased a few of them and a container to plant them in. This purchase was how  I started my succulent collection.

I bought a shallow terra-cotta planter that looks something like a pie dish.  The circular planter  is wide at the top and shallow – only about 3 inches deep. I still have the dish I purchased  and I still have several types of Aloe Vera plants.

Aloe Vera plants brighten our  rooms

from late fall to early spring. 

As soon as I am sure winter frosts are over,  my plants go outside to live on our wraparound porch for about 6 months a year.  They thrive in the bright light of the porch, yet they are protected from  rain and direct sunlight.  It is important to keep the plants out of the rain  because they will get too wet and begin to rot.  The need to be in containers of terra-cotta for good  drainage.

With good care you can have your Aloe Vera plants for many years.

Everything you ever want to know about t Aloe Vera Plants

Here is a poem I wrote when my Partridge Breasted Aloe was blooming.

“Partridge Breasted Aloe”

She thrust her pointed daggers

upward and outward

concave deep green leaves

adorned with white spots

front and back.

Basks in winter sunshine.

from a center core at the base

spiny and plump

with white designs

on the spruce green leaves.

 

Winter is flowering season

one long stem bursts above

like a quiet barn swallow

shooting up from the center

of a rosette in the springtime

one salmon pink flower

fills my mornings with a delicate scent

no fragrance can match

the fragile beauty of her perfume.

 

Partridge Breast is a sun worshipper

thrives in the south-facing window

prefers to drink less in winter.

 

Partridge Breast is the Queen of my collection

succulents and cacti, my delights.

Partridge Breasted Aloe brings

a sense of peace to my home.

When spring rains turn towards

Summer’s cat-like days

my succulent friends spend their

vacation on my sun-drenched porch

where no grooming is necessary.

By Lynda McKinney Lambert, 2017.

Previously Published:

Naturewriting, Literary Magazine -, Feb. 13, 2018

Behind Our Eyes: A Literary Sunburst – Anthology #3. 2019

Please SHARE this post with your Social Media Friends.

I only ask that you print the complete article with the copyright documentation at the end – as it is here.  Share the Happiness!

I LOVE YOU FOR  THAT!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “Friday Favs – Aloe Vera: Winter Delights

    • Hi Alice. How nice of you to comment on my latest post about Aloe Vera plants. I am a collector of them – which happens naturally as the plants multiply over the years. I have not been without Aloe Vera in my home for well over twenty years. When I taught at the college, I had two enormous ones in my art studio classroom. The lighting was perfect for them and they flourished in the filtered light in the window wells. Our classroom was in the basement of Old Main.

      Yes, the wraparound porch is a lonely place in winter time. No plants, no rocking chairs, and no people .

      Like

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