Friday Favorites

Friday Favorites

TGIF:  A Reflection on This Week

#1 in my new series of Friday Favorites

 

  Friday is always a good day to pause and reflect

on the week that is almost behind us.

 

What is YOUR FRIDAY FAVORITE REFLECTION for this week?

Does one bright and shining moment stand out to you?

I’d love to hear about it – you can leave a message for me at the end of this post.

 

 

My Friday Favorite Reflection is:

“Primavera: When Spring Break is Over,”

was published.

for the first time this week by Editor, Ron Harton, NatureWriting Literary Magazine.

 

I wrote this poem in 2015. I revised it recently and sent it out for consideration to this editor.

It is a collage or collection of events, people, and stories  from many Spring Break trips to Puerto Rico. I combined these things with my imagination to create a memorable poem.

 Read my poem and see a photo of a tropical waterfall by going to this link, on NatureWriting.  

Click here to read my poem on Naturewriting

 

Do you take photographs or write in a journal when you are on a trip? 

You can turn them  into a poem or non-fiction essay.

Poetry is a good way to share your life experiences with an audience.

 When you look back over this week, can you find some special people, events, travels or opportunities that just happened to pop up on your horizon? Friday is a great day to think about what you experienced this week.

What do you have to be thankful for this Friday?

I am thankful for good editors who make it possible for writers to share their work with a wide audience.

Write what comes to your mind today.  

 

 

____________________

Western Pennsylvania author, Lynda McKinney Lambert, writes full-time from her rural home since her retirement from teaching in 2008.

Lynda’s 2 full-length hybrid books:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage, 2003, Kota Press.

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, 2017 DLD Books.

_Nominated for “Skirt Best of the Net for 2016-2017” for her issay, “Knitting a Life Back Together.” This essay  was published in Spirit Fire Review, 2016.

_2018 Proverse (Hong Kong) Poetry Publication Prize for, “Red December,” published in Mingled Voices #2. Available on Amazon.com.

_ “first snow,” her first chapbook, now available for publication opportunities.

_Lynda’s career featured in the new book, Artful Alchemy, editor, Anne Copeland,2017.

_Lynda’s work appears in Indiana Voice Journal; Spirit Fire Review, Magnets & Ladders, Breath & Shadow, Poetry Quarterly, Tana Society of America (Spent Blossoms, Anthology 2016), Plum Tree Tavern, NatureWriting, The Avocet, Plinth, blue Unicorn, Pro Christo, Proteus, No Limits, Kaleidoscope, Wordgathering, Proverse (Hong Kong) Poetry Prize & publication in Mingled Voices 2, Anthology),  and more.

Lynda loves a rural lifestyle; walking through a meadow of wild flowers and thistles; gazing at a star-strewn sky; spending solitary winter days with her husband, Bob, their 2 rescued cats and 2 rescued dogs.  Lynda is an avid knitter who designs wearable art. She creates award-winning Talismans and art works of encrusted beadwork.

 

Lynda’s newest work:

_ first snow.  This chapbook is ready for publication.

_Star Signs: New & Selected Poems, Full-length book is now ready for publication.

 Copyright 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Contact Lynda at riverroad@zoominternet.net

 

 

 

Thursday Travels

Post #80

May 16, 2018

Thursday Travels:  Venice, Italy

I sat on a bench and drew  in my sketchbook.

My annual weekends in Venice were nearly always in July.  I came to celebrate Redentore Festival.

Link to Redentore Festival, 2018 schedule

I was usually outside on the streets most of the day when I was in Venice. There is so much to see and enjoy. I didn’t want to miss a bit of it.

  I enjoyed watching the city come to life each day.

There is a feeling you have in Venice that is different than any place I’ve ever visited.  Elegance, history, and beauty surround you any time of day or night.

First, the street sweepers  arrived before dawn.

They begin cleaning the streets of  accumulations from the day and night before. Each morning  the streets are renewed by a team of street sweepers.  They work quickly and I love watching them. This morning ritual was like watching a lyrical dance on a stage.

Next, the people who live in  the buildings that surround the campos arrive.

Some scurry off to work; others are opening their shops; some to church services; others, to sit quietly and talk toge.  You have the feeling that this activity has not hcanged over the centuries – it is a ritual of awakening each day in such an historic place.

I always carried my sketchbook with me on my excursions. 

I sketched; wrote poems; snapped photos. 

This photo captures life in Venice, Italy. 

PHOTO:  The 2 Venetian women never saw me sitting nearby  for they were absorbed in conversation.

This is their  hood.

___________

Thank you for visiting my SCAN blog today!

How I appreciate all of you!

This essay and photograph is brought to you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems being published.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

this blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright May 17, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Tuesday Treasures

Tuesday  Treasures

 In Which I  Discover a TREASURE.  

#1 in my Series: Tuesday Treasures

 

  Let me ask you:

Do you want to make changes in your life?

  • Are you becoming aware that some individuals or a groups you may be around  no longer serve you in a positive and life-affirming way?
  • Do your encounters with them leave you feeling encouraged appreciated?           Or is it the opposite?

Do your friends or close associates  spur your to:

  • do your finest work?
  • think your highest thoughts?
  • grow  beyond your wildest dreams?
  • flourish and blossom?

Have you outgrown your flowerpot? Click here!

YOU are a TREASURE.

Be the person God created you to be.   Shine!

You already know

what you need to do.

 

DSC08504.jpg

 

I bought a few new flowerpots recently.

Some of my succulent plants were too crowded into  old pots.

They will grow much nicer now that they are in the beautiful new green flowerpots!

Dig yourself up out of that old flower-pot

that no longer holds your expanding roots,

Transplant yourself into a beautiful, large, new flowerpot

that will provide ample room and opportunities for

your exciting new growth.

 

Tuesday’s Treasure:

Spring is here and NOW  is your time to FLOURISH.

Untangle yourself from the grasping weeds that are trying to choke you!

Let me know how this works for you!

__________

This essay is shared with  you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems in recent publications.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

This blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright May 8, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

April’s Benefits

 April’s Benefits Arrived

with the Spring Showers

Post #78 on this blog!

 

 

Today: I stand on the edge of the END of APRIL

I begin thinking of the CHANGES this time in the cycle of life can give us. I wrote a blog post  on SCAN in April 2015. I looked back at that post from 3 years ago and edited it.

 April whispers,  “Move on!”

 

Bright spring flowers flourish all around us by mid-April.

I bought a little pot of yellow tulips recently. They brightened our dining room table and made me feel happy every time I glanced at them. I am not a gardener so I enjoy buying potted plants and floral bouquets throughout the year with the changing seasons. April’s flowers sparkle with brilliance in dazzling yellow daffodils, tulips in a range from vivid red and coral, to soft pink and white. By the end of April, Pennsylvania’s grassy meadows will be covered with blankets of  purple-blue violets.

 

Our walk home from grade school took a bit longer when I was a little girl.

Our rural home was nearly a mile from the school and  we walked along a meandering path morning and afternoon. By mid-April we found the delightful blooming violets in the fields.The small, fragrant blooms beckoned my sister and me to come closer!

 

We forgot that we were supposed to walk directly home after school

on those long-ago spring days as we stooped down low, extended our eager hands, and began picking violets to take back home with us. The hot afternoon sun beat down on us as we gathered a fist full of the fragile delights. Once home with our treasured flowers, we put them in  little glass jelly jars. Our bouquets remained in a special space on our kitchen windowsill. To this day, many decades later, I still remember the joy of small wildflowers in the house

April signaled that it is now the beginnings of new life surging in Nature. 

On mornings like this one, I take leisurely walks with the dogs. I became conscious of the subtle changes today. After a long lasting winter this year, each new spring day seems especially precious as it brings warmth, sunshine, budding bushes and trees.

We forget we have several senses  that give  us information.

We dwell primarily on the visual stimulation and distractions.  I am legally blind and the entire world is a diffusion of shadowy forms that are distorted, foggy impressions. The positive aspect of sight loss is that I am more aware of  a variety of nuances I missed out on when I was fully sighted. I was too focused on looking and learning only through my eyes.

 

On my morning walk,  I listened carefully

to low sounds of an owl singing its final notes as the sunshine brought strong light to this new day. I thought about the owl and imagined it must be celebrating the end of a fruitful night of hunting for food.  It sounded content.

While the owl can settle down and relax to have a nice sleep for the day, I am just beginning my day. I breathe deeply and felt the coldness on my face and hands. My face tingled with the cold breeze and my hands reminded me they are exposed and I have not brought along a pair of gloves to warm them up on this hour-long walk.

But, I am not so concerned with the coolness of the morning today.

Instead, my thoughts move on to the meaning of spring and how each day is bringing changes to the world around me. The cold air  is just right for this new day. I reach down occasionally to tell my dog, “Good Girl! Heel. Good Heel. Good Girl!.” She glances up at me, and quickly looks back at the path before her and sniffs the air. When we come to a wooded place, near an abandoned mill, I relax her leash and allow her to enjoy tramping in the winter packed leaves that lay all around the trees. She digs down into them  and pushes the soggy leaves aside. She seeks direct passage to the scent that caught her attention. Eventually, I pull her back to heel position and we continue on for the second half of our morning travels. We turn the bend to head back towards home together.

***

I know that we often think of January as a time of new beginnings.

After all, it marks the New Year. Perhaps we might rethink this idea when we find ourselves walking in the early morning in April, with the warming of spring sunshine on our bodies. April truly is the time of new beginnings. April whispers to us,  “move on!”

April affirms life and growth

We can DISCOVER, RECOVER, and REVISE our life.

__________

This essay is brought to you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems being published.

Lynda’s  Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

this blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright April 29, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Visit me:  www.lyndalambert.com

Author:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage: Poems, Kota Press, 2003

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017

First Snow : Chapbook, is ready for publication.

Editors: contact me for information & viewing.

 

 

When Night Comes – a Chapbook

I wrote this review of a chapbook by Tennessee Poet, Wes Sims. This lovely book of poetry was published in Campbell’s World, a blog owned  by another Tennessee author, Patty Fletcher.  Thank you, Patty, for your interest in writing and promotion of so many authors.

 

READING WITH THE AUTHORS:

Author Lynda McKinney Lambert Reviews

When Night Comes

Good morning Bookworms everywhere.
After having taken a couple personal days off, Campbell and I are back in action here in campbellsworld.
This morning I’ve a treat for you.
Author Lynda McKinney Lambert is back in our Reading With the Authors column with a review of a poetry that has made even me want to read it.
I’m not one to read such a book as is described here but after reading this review and having read a bit of Lynda’s original work well I have to consider the source and agree to give it a try.
Now I invite you to read Lynda’s thoughts here, and then maybe share a few of your own.
For sure share this post with your friends and make certain to read all about how to find her books before you go.

 

When Night Comes

by Wesley Sims
A Book Review by Lynda McKinney Lambert

I met poet Wes Sims one Sunday morning while reading my weekly issue of a poetry magazine, The Weekly Avocet,  published by Charles Portolano, features poetry that has a nature theme. In one particular issue, I encountered 3 Haiku poems by Sims. Each intrigued me for he presented new ways of looking at something ordinary. The nature-themed poems caught my attention. Since Mr. Portolano encourages his writers to drop a note to other poets and to make friends with them, I sent a note to Wes Sims to say how much I enjoyed his poems.

Eventually, I learned about Wes Sims’ poetry chapbook, “When Night Comes,” because he sent me a copy. I’ve enjoyed reading this 28-page chapbook. It is a collection of twenty-four poems. You can purchase it directly from Wes Sims by contacting him – he will even sign it for you!  (I’ve included his E-mail at the end of this essay.)

The chapbook’s cover is a moody black and white photo of a nocturnal landscape by the author. I thought “This is the perfect image for this collection of poems.” In addition to writing poetry, Sims likes to do photography. I found that the all-seeing-eye of the photographer is apparent in the poems, as I read through this collection. He sees and speaks of little details that might go unnoticed. It is in the description of the little things that we are brought into Sims’ world through his poems.

In “How to Use a Shoebox,” Wes Sims gives us his secret intention for writing:
“the impact of little things preserved” (p.4)

The mostly one-page poems are created by building up layers of finely nuanced accumulations. Sims is actively viewing and preserving as he writes the poems.. Minute images are intertwined with his personal and private memories as he has known them in rural Tennessee.

Sims describes his world – the present and the distant or even the historical past of his rural landscapes in Tennessee. Reading through the poems brings the reader right into his family circle. This is the place where Past and Present merge. The poem becomes a confluence in which time is collapsed. The individuals he presents are not generalized people, but they are family and they are named.

“grandson; grandmother; Mr. Newman; Sister; Dad; Mother; Uncle Bo; Mrs.. Engle…”

This gives us a feeling that we know them personally or that we have just met them even though many of the people who populate his poems are no longer in this world.

But, more than this Sims gives us a deeper understanding of life as he has known it – and we feel like we, too, have lived this life. In the poem, “Eyes to See,” he speaks of watching a blind man…

“Until one day, when I saw
Him in a church setting
Heard his lips sing out in prayer,
And received my revelation—
I was a blind man, too.”
(from “Eyes to See,” p. 24)

Through the book we see deserted old rundown barns and abandoned empty sheds; time-worn, rarely travelled roads up into the hills; and the last days of people who have passed away. No matter where we live or what our life is like, we relate to Wes Sims and his reflections on particular individuals, rural life, death of loved ones;, flowers, dogs, songs, snakes, music, personal memory and history. We know that our lives are enriched by the small things and places we encounter over a lifetime. It all adds up, in the end. Unimportant and trivial things really do matter.

You can find this chapbook for sale on the publishers website:

Buy it at Finishing Line Press, Link here!to read more.
Also available directly from Wes Sims at:   wes4words@att.net

_____

Meet Lynda McKinney Lambert.  Owner of this blog, SCAN.

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems
© 2017 by Lynda McKinney Lambert

Pennsylvania artist, teacher, and author Lynda McKinney Lambert invites readers into her world of profound sight loss to discover the subtle nuances and beauty of a physical and spiritual world. She takes strands from ancient mythology, history, and contemporary life and weaves a richly textured new fabric using images that are seen and unseen as she takes us on a year-long journey through the seasons.
All stories in this book were created after her sudden sight loss in 2007 from Ischemic Optic Neuropathy. Lambert invites us to see the world with new eyes.
Available in e-book ($3.99) and print ($14.95) from Amazon, Smashwords, and other sellers. Full details, free 20% text preview, and buying links: http://www.dldbooks.com/lyndalambert/
Edited by David and Leonore H. Dvorkin of DLD Books: http://www.dldbooks.com/
Cover layout by David Dvorkin / Cover photo and back cover text by the author

 

 

Just SCAN it!

Just  SCAN It!

SCAN: A blog written by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

I’ve been taking a break since the beginning of the year. In fact, I’ve been ABIDING.

This is my ONE WORD for 2018.  I won’t be doing anything in a RUSH. I’m taking my TIME and WAITING.  I’ll write when I FEEL like I have something to say. Something meaningful. Something Spirit-Led. Something to Lift your Spirit as well as MINE.

SCAN (the blog) was created over 3 years ago.

Why call the blog, SCAN?

Let’s have a LOOK at the word SCAN.

First, it is a verb and a noun

Definition of scan for English Language Learners

  • : to look at (something) carefully usually in order to find someone or something

  • : to look over or read (something) quickly

  • : to look at the inside of (something) by using a special machine

I am a visual artist and author who is visually impaired. Everything I do depends on the use  of equipment that is developed for BLIND and VISUALLY IMPAIRED users.

 

Scan

(quoted from dictionary dot com)

 

14 Definitions of the word, SCAN:

 

verb (used with object), scanned, scanning.

1.

to glance at or over or read hastily:

to scan a page.

2.

to examine the particulars or points of minutely; scrutinize.

3.

to peer out at or observe repeatedly or sweepingly, as a large expanse;survey.

4.

to analyze (verse) as to its prosodic or metrical structure; read or recite(verse) so as to indicate or test the metrical form.

5.

to read (data) for use by a computer or computerized device, especially usingan optical scanner.

6.

Television. to traverse (a surface) with a beam of light or electrons in order toreproduce or transmit a picture.

7.

Radar. to traverse (a region) with a beam from a radar transmitter.

verb (used without object), scanned, scanning.

8.

to examine the meter of verse.

9.

(of verse) to conform to the rules of meter.

10.

Television. to scan a surface or the like.

SCAN as a noun

11..

an act or instance of scanning; close examination.

12..

a visual examination by means of a television camera, as for the purpose ofmaking visible or relaying pictures from a remote place:

a satellite scan of the dark side of the moon; video scans of property listingsavailable to customers.

13.

a particular image or frame in such video observation or a photograph made from it.

14. a blog written by Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

_____

Brought to you by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

Visit me at Lynda Lambert’s Website

Find my latest book at My Authors Page.

 

ABIDE with ME

2018

___ONE WORD___

ABIDE

For the 4th year, I selected ONE WORD

to guide my intentions.

 

 

Why did I choose ABIDE?  

Abide is a VERB. 

verb (used without object), abode or abided, abiding

1.

to remain; continue; stay; stand

 

2.

to have one’s abode; dwell; reside

 

3.

to continue in a particular direction, condition, attitude, relationship, path; last.

 

 

I discovered  that my ONE WORD seems to FIND ME. That particular word

ABIDE

seemed to hover around for a while in my everyday life. The thought of it  kept on coming into my awareness for the past few weeks.  I seemed to KNOW it is the right word for my year.

 

My ONE WORD FEELS right.

 

Did you know?

We have God-given INTUITION.

Our personal intuition GUIDES US much better than a GPS.

We have accurate and specific DIRECTION for our life. Pay attention to it.

We all have INTUITION  –  a still, small voice inside of us.

Listen for it.

 

Have YOU thought about choosing ONE WORD that will guide you in the direction you intend to go this year?

 

What comes to your mind right now?

Grab ONE WORD and make it YOURS!

 

 

 

___________

Lynda McKinney Lambert is a Western Pennsylvania author and visual artist.

View Publications Page for updates.

Lynda’s  Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

this blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright December 30, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

“Thanks for rejoicing with me today.  Isn’t God so wonderful!”

Romans 8:28

Coming Home

I always knew  it!  I am Irish and German.  

 

This year I joined Ancestry dot com

Surprise! Surprise!

 

In Addition to Irish and German ancestry, I am

Scandinavian (over 30 percent)

Iberian

Greek

Eastern European Jewish!

I descended from a wide variety of cultures

     and I bet you did, too!

 

What big surprises you will have in store. All of the ancestral groups above moved around over the centuries because they were chased away, persecuted, and unwanted at some time in the past.

I would say that all of the various people groups, at some time in history, have been moved to a variety of locations and continents because of wars, religious persecution, slavery, and/or  the desire to have a better life in a new place.

It didn’t take me long to find my ancestral roots in Europe. In fact, the first day I traced my paternal grandmother, Effie Pearl Rugh, back to my 8th Great-grandfather in the Palatinate  area in Europe, which is now in Germany.

I WAS home.

Another few days brought me to the location from which my maternal great grandfather and my Maternal 2nd Great Grandparents  came from in Bavaria, Germany. I was overjoyed to learn this because for about 12 years I traveled to Bavaria every summer where I taught  a college course. Now, I know why I always felt like I came home when I arrived there every summer. I believe we have a collective unconscious that allows us to intuit such inner feelings as this. After all, we can know through our DNA that we belong to many different ethnic groups – it just makes sense to me that not only our DNA reveals this, but our MIND reveals it, too. We are home!

_____

Photos and essay by Lynda McKinney Lambert.  Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.

_____

 

 

2006_Koenigsee_View

 Köenigsee, Germany

Photo by Lynda McKinney Lambert

A Kick in the Head

A Kick in the Head? Really?

What is going on? 

 

Why would anyone destroy a work of ART?

A violent scene of the destruction of public statues is nothing new in the history of humanity. Recently, I considered the historical context of what I’ve been watching on TV recently when I saw groups of people destroying public statues and literally kinking the a sculpture’s head as it bounded in the street after a violent encounter with anti-art protesators.

This group-think type of behavior  is quite interesting to SEE and makes us ASK, “What is going on?” Is art really that dangerous to humanity? Seems like a strange way of behaving, doesn’t it!

Some serious research into past historical events, from the Ancient to Contemporary cultures, will provide examples of this same behavior. But in most of the past circumstances, the general public  didn’t have television to view it every day like we do now. I’ts  also happening in other countries around the world besides here in the United States of America. Seems senseless, doesn’t it!

Is ART Dangerous?

Art always reflects the heart and soul of a civilization.

Art is ALWAYS viewed as the FIRST TARGET that must be DESTROYED by invading people groups. The destruction of ART is the beginning of what is to follow.  Destruction of the nation’s art and the burning of libraries and books – go hand in hand. You see, those things are dangerous for they reflect the ability to THINK and to show a Collective Consciousness and PRIDE in their country. Invading groups want to destroy any artifact that reveals a nation’s PRIDE and THOUGHTS about life in the time in which they are living.

For the Greeks.

As a Humanities Professor, when I was lecturing on Greek Culture, I was always asked, “Why do all the statues have missing arms or heads? Why are the statues all broken up and why are they buried under the rubble of buildings?”  We have to THINK about why the statues are broken up and body parts missing, and why is there so much rubble from buildings that were magnificent?

It’s always the same answer – another culture who wanted to conquer them came to destroy the culture that made the statues and buildings. For the Greeks, it was the Romans who flooded into their country and destroyed everything in sight and enslaved the Greeks. Yet after they destroyed the Greek cities, the Romans enslaved the Greek artists and sculptors and made them make ROMAN works. Every culture that destroys another culture, will TAKE the IDEAS from the ART of the conquered culture’s country and remake it into their OWN. It is RE-Presented as their own art. (Check out Greco-Roman art to see what I mean!

Culture is what people  left behind – the ART.  We can know the heart and mind of a people by viewing their art. In the art we see their IDEAS.

For the Romans.

It was barbarian tribes who lived in areas surrounding Rome, and also those foreign people were permitted to enter Rome and were given citizenship. They flooded into the country, and became a fifth column, that brought Rome down. These invaders were Islamic and even the insides of the beautifully decorated Roman buildings were white-washed over to destroy the stories and scenes on the walls that were crafted in mosaic.

For Now.

We have seen in our own lifetime, the destruction of ancient Buddhist statues in remote mountain areas, blasted or pulled down by Islamic radicals. We have seen museums vandalized and priceless artifacts from the ancient past destroyed by invading hoards of ignorant and violent people.

For Us.

We see this same hatred of art  in our own country recently. Just like the plunderers of the Greek Art Works, a hand-full of Zealots are destroying statues – works of art. The destructive individuals appear to be in a frenzy of madness.

I have to wonder if any of them have ever taken the effort to dig into their own cultural roots. I mean,  the thousands of years of their migrations and influences and the overall big picture of their very own history. I think their ancestors would be ashamed at their lack of respect for the land and the laws in which they live presently.

What Do We Have in Common?

Every people group in this world has been persecuted at some point in the  long historical past. We find that such movement of various people groups over the thousands of years from one geographical place to another. When we begin doing work in ancestry, we soon see the migrations of the various people groups – and I mean ALL of them. We are ALL descendants of a VARIETY of people groups – every people group on this planet has roots from a variety of cultures. When you get your DNA done and you begin doing research, you soon learn you are a descent of  about 6 or more, different people groups from wide areas of the world.

Anarchy ALWAYS pinpoints the CULTURAL ARTIFACTS of a country or people group to DESTROY as a way of trying to destroy that very culture. They are trying to destroy Cultural Memory – but they don’t even know what that is. Angry people from a variety of cultural backgrounds are at work today to destroy their  own world. Each individually involved in anarchy and destruction of public art is really giving their own culture a kick in the head.

 

 

_____Copyright, August 20, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved. _____