Dialogue in the Dark

Are you afraid of the dark?

I have to admit it.  I am!

OK, the weird thing about  my confession is

I am a blind person.

Maribel Steel, a low vision writer for Vision Aware Blog (on the American Foundation for the Blind website)  joins the CEO of Guide Dogs Victoria shared this great audio interview about Dialogue in the Dark experiences.

Peek Inside Dialogue in the Dark

on ABC Radio National.

I have to say, it is memorable and this conversation gives us insight into the experience a sighted person has when they find themselves completely “in the dark” with a blind or low vision guide.

I would love to be able to have this experience.

http://maribelsteel.com/category/audio-stories/

 

My Life as a Pivot

My Life as a Pivot

 

I am pivoted from one location, to another. I turn, and move suddenly to a new route. I change. 

May is the month of graduation ceremonies.  Nearly 3 decades ago, I walked down the aisle in my cap and gown to receive my third, and final, degree.  The formal procession marked the end of 9 years of diligent work in which I earned 3 university degrees at 2 different universities, in 2 different states.  Of course, I was happy to reach the lofty educational goals I set.  But, even so, I had a strange sense of loss because I was leaving the environment of being a student in the myriad of classrooms over those years. I loved being a student. When that final diploma was in my hand, I knew I stood at a fork in the road. This achievement meant that I had reached dividing point between my student-centered life of studies and my new academic life as a professional educator.

 

When students begin to pursue the academic goals that lead to a college degree, they decide to embrace a future-centered environment that will involve them in life-long learning.

I eventually understood that even as a first semester freshmen, a university student is already a professional. It is the decision to begin this journey that propels a student into a professional. It is the decision that marks the change and not the receipt of the final degree.  The final graduation ceremony was the turning point for me because it signified a momentous modification in direction. I mourned the loss of being in a classroom, as a student, for many years. Honestly, I wanted to be a student forever.

On reflection of those years, I can say I wrote more research papers than I can remember. Writing and researching various topics in my fields of fine arts and humanities motivated me and urged me onward in pursuit of wisdom.

I thrived on doing research at the library; searching through the pages of various periodicals or books was a passion.

In the process of writing papers, I discovered new research.  I felt like an archaeologist digging in a multi-layered excavation site. Every page I turned just might lead to a new discovery.  New discoveries revealed a new set of questions and new paths to pursue.

We often find hidden pathways and ancient passages in the debris and dust we gather as we write our papers. There is always something that compels us to explore.  Dig deeper. In the course of researching and writing papers, I experienced the unexpected or unknown.  It is in these pivots of our life that we encounter our true self as we continually ask:

“What if?”  “Now what?” “Where will this lead me?”  “What is this world view?”

Miriam Webster’s Dictionary reveals that a pivot can be a noun or a verb. Yes, I can see it both ways but when I think of this word, pivot, I feel like an action is taking place. This word indicates a movement, to me. Research brings me to new information. New conclusions.

 

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Visit the  WELCOME PAGE to learn more about Lynda McKinney Lambert. activities and career.

Lynda McKinney Lambert lives and writes in the Village of Wurtemburg, in Western Pennsylvania.  Her articles and poems appear on a number of blogs, as well as Literary Magazines and books.

View Publications Page for her most recent updates.

Discover Lynda’s other blog, Walking by Inner Vision.

 

Check out Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

Copyright 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

“Thanks for rejoicing with me today.  Isn’t God so wonderful!”

Romans 8:28

 

 

 

Guest Post: Ida Matilda’s Cream Pitcher

Enjoy this guest blog that appeared today on Abbie’s Corner of the World. Thank you, Abbie, for reading my poem for the blogging world to enjoy, too.
I truly appreciate this beautiful blog and am so glad to share it here on SCANdalous-Recollections today.

Abbie's Corner of the World

Today, I’m pleased to have Lynda McKinney Lambert as a guest. She’s the author of Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage (Kota Press, 2003) and Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems. (DLD Books, 2017) She’s also an artist and teacher who suddenly lost her eyesight ten years ago. You can read reviews of Walking by Inner Vision on my blog and on the Vision Aware site. Here’s one of her poems, which you can also read on her blog. It’s about her grandmother’s cream pitcher, a photo of which is below.

***

Ida Matilda’s Cream Pitcher

by Lynda McKinney Lambert, 2017

I loved to spend endless, languid

days at Grandma’s house, sitting

around her plentiful kitchen table. Ida

Matilda’s raisin-filled cookies, sprinkled with

granulated sugar,

apple pies and yeast breads served hot from her oven

tart cherry desserts and homemade blackberry jam.

I poured heavy cream this morning…

View original post 261 more words

Solitude

When from our better selves we have too long
Been parted by the hurrying world, and droop,
Sick of its business, of its pleasures tired,
How gracious, how benign is Solitude!  

—Hermit

 

I arrived at the Hambidge Center  in Rabun Gap, GA in the summer of 1988. It was late at night.  In the darkness, I drove into the driveway after my long journey from western Pennsylvania. I walked  to the main house where I met the manager  who would take me to where I would live  for the next month. I was going to be doing a Residency  and would be given a studio and place to live where I could do my art every day.  It was a great opportunity and a dream come true for me.

My guide  said, “I hope you like isolation.” My reply was, “Oh, yes! I love isolation.” The fact is, I did not have an inkling what isolation was but it sounded good to me.

Of course, I had no idea what isolation truly was for I had just arrived at this isolated art colony deep in the Georgia mountains. My normal life was back in Pennsylvania where I managed my busy home and family.  I cooked meals from scratch every day for my husband and 5 children. My homemade pies were famous among the ladies at my church.   The first thing I did each morning was 3 loads of Laundry.  In between the layers of  the business of taking care of husband, kids, dogs, cats, and anything else that came up, I was a non-traditional student pursuing the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree.  Every spare moment I could find, I painted.  Painting was my obsession.

Driving up the steep mountain road, I followed his car.  Then we turned onto a pathway to the isolated little house where I would be living and working.  After the man left me there, alone, in the middle of the Blue Ridge Mountains – in utter darkness – I began to get an idea of what solitude would be like. While I was excited to be there, to have this opportunity, I was also stuck with the reality (and fear) of solitude.

My life was changing. I was diagnosed with breast cancer just 2 months before this trip.  And, my father died 2 weeks before the day I found myself alone at night in a strange place where I would live for the next month. My nerves were a frazzle.

 

But, the month I spent there, away from everyone and everything that was my normal life  was one of the most productive times in my creative life.  In this mountain solitude,  I was united with my “better self.”  Twenty-nine years later, I remain at peace  and solidly united with my “better self.”

Article and Photography by Lunda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright, May 16, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Lynda  McKinney Lambert

.Front Cover

Blogger:

Author:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage (Kota Press), 2002.

   

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017 

Lynda is a Peer Adviser  and writes articles on sight loss and blindness for  Vision Aware Blog

CONTACT ME: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 Author – Blogger – Visual Artist

Lynda Lambert: Interview

I was a guest on the Branco Broadcast

on Monday, March 6, 2017

The interview is recorded and you can click on this link to listen in to my presentation on how my latest book developed.

Lynda talks about her NEW BOOK

You can also listen to my FIRST interview on the Braco Broadcast, last December. In this interview I discuss my sight loss  and how I learned to live and work in new ways. I discuss my first book,

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage. 

Lynda talks about INTENTIONS

 

 

I am the author of the new book

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems 

Lynda’s Author Page

Valentine’s Day: Visit a Museum

The article below was just  published in Vision Aware, a blog for the American Foundation for the Blind.  I am a Peer Adviser with this organization and this is my latest contribution.

 

You can read this article and others by me  at the links provided.

 

Six Tips for Your Out-of-the-Box Museum Visit

Stop Tracking This Blog By E-mail

Editor’s note: Just in time for planning for Valentine’s Day, we bring you this post by Lynda Lambert. Lynda suggests that you might consider a similar trip to a museum or art gallery as a fun Valentine’s outing. Read and enjoy!

Visiting the Andy Warhol Museum

Recently, I invited my daughter and great-granddaughter to help me celebrate my birthday with a visit to the Andy Warhol Museum which is located about 40 miles from our home. Since my great-granddaughter was celebrating her birthday that month, it was perfect timing for us. This could be a great idea for a Valentine’s Day excursion with a friend or family member too.

I wanted to take photographs in the museum, so I asked at the entrance desk for permission. My only restriction was to not use a flash on the camera. That is normal as a flash causes long-term damage to art work. I wondered what the receptionist might be thinking when he saw me walking with a long white mobility cane and asked to take photos during my visit. I still chuckle to myself about this conflicting image. Our excursion was so enjoyable I wanted to share some tips with you so your next visit to a museum can be as much fun as ours was.

Six Tips for an Out-of-the-Box Museum Visit

Artist holding a piece of artwork in a gallery

Tip One: Visit the Museum Website for Accommodations

The website will have a link for directions to the museum, educational programs, special exhibits with dates, contact information, and a link for accommodations information. If you need more details, call the museum.

One interesting thing you can find on the schedule is when they have a docent tour or an artist presentation. Both of these are informative and educational. The artist presentation is one way to find out about the art process directly from the artist who made it. They will answer any questions you have and even put the art work in your hands if possible.

Tip Two: Wear Comfortable Shoes

Two women looking at art in a glass displayI recommend that you wear comfortable walking shoes. My great-granddaughter found this out in a painful way during our visit. She walked into the museum in high heels. By the time we looked at the first two floors of art, she was getting blisters. Fortunately, the museum store had some flip-flops for sale so she could change her shoes and continue to have a good day.

Tip Three: Review the Floor Plan for Display Information

The museum we selected has seven floors of art works and the floors are very large. Decide before you begin how you will see the various art shows. We wanted to see all seven floors.

We also looked to see where the bathrooms are located and where the stairs and elevators are situated. It’s a good idea to use the elevator. This removes the chance that I might have trouble navigating the many steps and it gives us a little break from one place to the next. There are usually some chairs to sit on near the elevators as well. Take advantage of these opportunities.

Tip Four: Select Exhibits that Feature Large Wall Works and Floor Displays

I like to seek out the galleries that have good light and dark contrasts for I am light sensitive. The best exhibits for me are large, bold, high contrast paintings, or large sculptures with a good amount of light and shadow on them. The Warhol Museum is an old factory, so the floors are concrete, which provides a very good contrast from the white walls.

Many galleries have intense lighting, white walls, and slick light wooden floors. This is a nightmare for a person with very low vision, and it can be dangerous for us because we become like a deer in the spotlight in such situations.

If you are extremely sensitive to light as I am, take some sunglasses with you and put them on.

An art display of three high contrast bowls

Tip Five: Take Breaks and Visit the Café and Museum Store

A museum can be overwhelming. You can walk for hours once you enter the building.

Be aware of the variety of displays and be selective. You just cannot see it all in one visit.

Decide in advance where you will go. Pace your visit to include periods of relaxation. Your feet will be thankful for some resting time during your visit.

We looked at three floors of art, then we went to the café for lunch. Museums have delicious sandwiches and a variety of salads and drinks. After we left the café, we stopped in to browse the items in the museum store. Of course, we came home with a few bags of interesting items, reproductions of art work, and some books.

Bonus Tips for Out-of-the-Box Art Viewing

Bonus Tip 1: Find Art in Unexpected Places

Have you noticed that many cities have art on display outdoors? You can find it unexpectedly as you stroll through parks and around urban areas. These sculptures are really great for people with vision loss to enjoy. We can walk up to the art work and explore it with our hands, walk around it, and really have a great experience.

Here is an example of some outdoor art I found in Ponce, Puerto Rico. It is a sculpture of a lion painted in many different colors.

Statue of a colorful lion with red socks

Bonus Tip 2: Outdoor Arts and Crafts Festivals

When is the last time you visited an Arts and Crafts festival? I have found many of the art works in my personal collection at such shows. You can meet the artist and learn about what she makes first hand. Prices are very good because you are buying directly from the artist. And, best of all, you can touch and hold just about anything that is on display at the artist’s booths. Some artists will even let you make art in their booth or demonstrate how they make their art. We all love a walk in the park, don’t we!

Do you think you will consider taking an Out-of-the-Box Art experience for Valentine’s Day or a special occasion this year? I would love to hear about it!

Learn More About Visiting a Museum with Vision Loss

Museum and Art Tours

Enjoying Cultural Activities When You Are Blind or Visually Impaired

Art Education for the Blind

Adapting Artworks for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired Using Raised Printing

Art Beyond Sight

Tips Before You Visit the Andy Warhol Museum

 

 

Lynda Lambert – Live

December 19, 2016.

You can enjoy this conversation now.

Writing with Intention – Set your INTENTIONS for 2017

Lynda McKinney Lambert – Writing with Intention, presented LIVE on Branco Boracast on Recorded LIVE.

 

 

Knitting15_Scarf9_4 Thanks for flying with me in 2015 on SCANdalous-Recollections.

Lynda McKinney Lamber

Visit my website at lyndalambert.com

 

Red December

This frigid yet refreshing morning inspired me to write a poem. I wrote about a favorite COLOR

– RED –

And I wanted to describe my morning walk

in the darkness with my dogs.

__________

Red December

New-fallen snow glimmers in pre-dawn darkness

slender red barberries dangle from thin bare branches

I shuffle my feet, dig in to feel solid ground

near the place where my Father’s red roses

are surrounded by pillows of snow

slumbering safe in dark red December.

 

My heavy suede boots part the snow

It’s too early for the red cardinals

“Where do they go at night?”

A sharp wind makes me huddle deeper into my bright

red boucle’ jacket

while my two dogs search random trails

follow the long marks, meander downhill.

 

 

On a crisp day in mid-December

I desire red raspberry jam on warm toast

Linger by the tall pampas grass

weighted down to the ground with icy snow

I think of strawberry Sundays with whipped cream

I recall wearing Neiman Marcus Red lipstick and

dancing all night in

hot red stilettos and tight blue jeans.

 

 

We turn around – for the return home

the dogs circle in the frozen pachysandra patches

stiff, brown-green  shrunken leaves.

In memories I see my neighbor walking to her car

she wears a cranberry red hat, worsted red wool coat, flat, scarlet red shoes

carries a true-red leather handbag like the one I bought last Sunday.

 

I watched her from the upstairs window.

In her 80s, she revealed how to live a gallant life.

 

No cars pass us on the country road  this morning in red December

Where it is perpetual winter.

 

By Lynda McKinney lambert. Copyright 2016. All rights reserved.

This is a FREE-FORM poem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Envision a Ship Coming In

Envision  a Ship Coming In

by Lynda Lambert

People often say, “I hope my ship comes in.”

In other words, they WANT to have something good come to them in some unexpected way. It usually means they need  a financial windfall  or help with something material they want to come to them. Definitely, this phrase expresses a need in their life and a longing for a quick fix.

The phrase also signifies a person feels helpless and really doubts that anything will change for them. It feels a bit helpless when you hear this longing desire for “somehthing,” doesn’t it? It makes me sad.

There is a universal law known as “SOWING & REAPING.”

When we are in need of a HARVEST, we must first plant the seeds for it.

Without the actions of preparing the soil and planting the seend, there is seldom a harvest.

As I hear a person  wondering if their ship will come in, I have to ask:

How many ships did you SEND OUT?

 

I send out a LOT of ships, so I can live in the expectation that many ships will come in for me.  And, just like we ENVISION, they DO come in – or come BACK ,  in DUE time.

Often my SHIPS come back through the mail. When my husband brings in the mail each day, I ask him:  “Did a ship come in the mailbox today?”

What DOES your SHIP LOOK LIKE? 

My SHIPS come in the form of CHECKS that arrive by MAIL Some  ships come in the form of INVITATIONS to important events that I will enjoy.

Occasionally ships come in the disguise of AWARDS for work I have done in writing and art. That is what I DO, it’s my profession. When I do it extremely well, I get paid with MONEY, FRIENDSHIPS,  LOVE, RESPECT, AWARDS, Publications   or  PUBLIC RECOGNITION.

 

Ships can arrive in dreams, in the middle of the night.  Ships will  come in conversations with others. Ideas for new projects or answers to difficult questions we are wrestling with can come unexpectedly.

 

Ships can be SENT OUT anywhere and at any time.

Ships can COME IN anywhere and at any time, too!

best-of-show-ribbon2

 Many years ago, I read a book by a well-known California pastor, Rev. Robert Schuller.

He spoke on reaping a harvest from God for our work. He said to CELEBRATE every award we receive, put those AWARD ribbons and plaques on our WALL and LOOK at them EVERY DAY – to remember that all our harvests come from GOD.

In my art studio, a wall is covered from ceiling to floor with colorful satin ribbons from all over the world –  they inspire me to do MORE and they affirm that what I do has been recognized by colleagues in my field. Each award is an affirmation by an expert in my field that my work passed the test and came in as a winner.

Likewise, in my office where I write; the walls are adorned  with plaques and framed recognition certificates I have received over the years  from  organizations I  served.  My diplomas from universities  where I earned 3 degrees push me forward to stay focused on what is important in my pursuit of  life-long learning.  I plan to do research and share my gifts with others even more in the years ahead. Diplomas are far more than a piece of paper. They are ships that vrought me through years of personal effort and dedication. When I look at them now, I feel like they are anchors that hold my ship fast  in any storm and keep me on course.

How about you?  

You may have many ships  yet to come in but if you have not yet sent them out, you will never be able to say, “My ship came in!”

When your SHIP does come IN, be sure to thank God for it, put the award ribbon or plaque on your wall, cash your checks, see your work in publications, and send off more ships – plant more seeds for an abundant harvest.

And, yes, stand proud and take a bow and pause to recognize your harvest.

 

OH, I almost forgot to share a ship that returned to me this morning.  You can read my wonderful NEWS today at this link:

http://www.visionaware.org/info/emotional-support/personal-stories/recreation-and-leisure-personal-stories/introducing-lynda-lambert-seasoned-writer-and-artist/1235

Please LIKE my  POST and offer me some comments. I enjoy it so much.

 

____

Copyright 2016. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

Contact Lynda: riverroad@zoominternet.net

Lynda’s newest book, “Walking by Inner Vision” will soon be published.

She is the author of “Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage,” by Kota Press.