What I WANT…

Post # 203

3 August 2019

 

What I Want…

by Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

Photo: “Lynda – A Portrait in the Garden,” by Bob Lambert

 

How do you know what to send

to the editor who wants to SHOWCASE

your LATEST BOOK in his magazine?

 

This week an EDITOR gave me the information he wants so he can publish a SHOWCASE for my latest book.  He will focus on my new book

Star Signs: New and Selected Poems, KDP, 2019.

My book was just published on July 15, 2019.

Remember, this is your SHOWCASE, so have FUN putting it together.

You want readers to buy your book and become READERS of your books.

 

  1. Put together a SHORT INTRO to your book for your READERS.
  2. Why did you write this book?  Be clear in this response.
  3. Why should the READER buy your BOOK? You must learn to ROMANCE your MERCHANDISE – your book IS MERCHANDISE that was made  to be SOLD.
  4. Create a SHORT WRITE-UP about YOU, the Author. You are SELLING YOURSLELF, first of all.
  5. Give 3 SHORT REVIEWS your book has garnered – Give the LINKS to the reviews.
  6. Give 3 SHORT EXAMPLES from your TEXT. (3 Short poems or 3 short excerpts from an essay or text of the book.)
  7. Put your INFORMATION under each SAMPLE.
  8. Give the NUMBER of PAGES  (or POEMS) in your book.
  9. Where can READERS BUY THE BOOK?
  10. Can they get a SIGNED COPY, and how much will it cost?

    –

This essay is brought to you by author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Click here  for MY BOOK PAGE

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

This blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright August 3, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 Let me know how this WORKS for YOU.

Leave me a comment, please.

I love to hear from my FRIENDS and READERS.

 

 

 

Coming soon – first snow Chapbook

 

first snow

 Lynda’s  Weather Report – first snow

 

A Letter to  Readers of  SCAN-A-BLOG

I am so pleased to let everyone know that my first chapbook,

first snow

is accepted for publication by Finishing Line Press

 

My chapbook is a wintry-themed collection of 30 poems.

 

My themes are:

nature – landscape

memory – passage of time

places & people

journeys – dreamscapes

 

 

Please enjoy 2  sample poems from the chapbook.

 

“Dream Sequence” # 4

In my dream

I climb upwards

on the ladder I stumbled upon

in the woods one afternoon.

Earth disappears

the ladder is unstable

“Keep it straight up,” I whisper.

“Keep your body centered. Stay poised.”

_

 

Photo: Lynda McKinney Lambert.
Bouquet of fresh flowers in a crystal vase.

 

 

“My Daughter Cut the Roses”

 

My daughter looked

at the bouquet of fresh roses

noticed two of them were drooping.

“Let me show you how to trim the roses

so they stay fresh and strong.” she said.

Her hands held the roses tenderly

One-by-one, trimmed off extra leaves

“These will make the water stink,” she said.

She found scissors in the drawer

put the roses in a bowl of tepid water

held each stem under water

sliced them all, diagonally –

“As I cut the rose under the water,

little bubbles of air come to the surface.

Now, when the rose inhales

it will only breathe water into it,

it won’t fill up with air.

The living water inside the stems

gives longer life to each rose.”

She carried the freshened flowers

In the tall glass vase

back to the center of the dining room table

darkest crimson buds, sunny yellow petals,

deep green fern leaves

and a frilly white carnation.

Finishing Line Press will send a Pre-publication announcement card for advance sales.

I am putting  together a list of friends who would like to received this invitation to buy the chapbook.

Finishing Line Press is a small specialty press.

The editors need to know in advance that at least

55 chapbooks will be sold at  $13.99.

 

While it feels uncomfortable for me

to ask you

to buy my chapbook,

I understand why a small press must know in advance

that the book sales will  justify  their  cost  of printing it.

 

 

I sincerely hope that you and your friends who love literature will want to be on my mailing list. The little book would be a really lovely holiday gift to send to friends on your personal list next Christmas!

MESSAGE ME

riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 

with your NAME and MAILING ADDRESS,

I will put you on the mailing list

to received the card.

Your response will let me know you want to be on my mailing list and that you would buy a chapbook. I’d certainly love to hear from you. Once I received your reply, I will have the publication announcement sent to you in early summer prior to publication.

 

Once the card arrives, you will have 2 weeks to order a chapbook

If you have friends who love literature and poetry, please send this message to them ASAP. I will be creating a mailing list and will include all who have sent me a response with your mailing information if you indicated you want to buy a book when you received the Pre-Publication Card.

 

The press run for the Chapbook

“will be determined by the SUCCESS or LACK THEREOF of advance sales.”

 

I will love knowing that my first chapbook, first snow, will be in your personal library or collection or that you chose to gift it to friends. This is an exciting new development in my writing life! Thank you, in advance, for your support of my poetry publication, first snow.

 

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved.

Lynda’s Poems:  Click here to read more poems!

Read more of Lynda’s HOT PICKS Click here.

Listen to the Audio of “Weather Observations” and “Of Smoke & Mirrors,” on Wordgathering:  Listen now!

SHARE THE HAPPINESS.

Share this post with friends on Social Media.

I only ask that you share the entire article AND the copyright information.

I’ll See YOU at the Top!

 

 

Contact: Lynda McKinney Lambert

104 River Road

Ellwood City, PA

E-mail: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

Friday Favs – SNAKE PLANT

Post #168

Friday, 8 February 2019

Friday Favs

SNAKE PLANT

Have you ever said –

“Nothing grows for me – I’m no gardener.

I kill everything!”

Before you write yourself off as a failure at growing plants or flowers –

consider buying a SNAKE PLANT.

You might find this an easy plant to take care of and you might even find some flowers blooming on your SNAKE PLANT one day.

You will be doing a “happy dance” all around the room!

Give  SNAKE PLANT a chance.

According to an article in the Old Farmer’s Almanac Newsletter on  February 6, 2019,

“A Snake Plant” is  also known as “Mother-in-Law’s Tongue.”  That was a surprise to me.

In the 1980s,  I attended an auction at the home of a neighbor.  When the auctioneer held up a pitiful looking Snake Plant, I was the only bidder on it.  Obviously, it had ben sadly neglected for a long time. The long leaves of the plant were withered and  discolored – it did not look promising. But, I came home with that plant and began to take good care of it. The plant  responded to the light watering I gave it and it was not long before my Snake Plant began to send up tender shoots of new plants. Better yet, it started to bloom! That is a thrill when your succulent blooms.

The Snake Plant in my home today, is the same one I bought over thirty years ago at that auction sale on a summer day.

Each year, I bring my prized Snake Plant  indoors for winter, and it spends about 6 months of the year outside on my wraparound porch.

I make sure it is shielded from rain  because it does not like to be wet. And,

On my porch, it  gets a few hours of sunshine every day. It is on the south/west side of the porch. My Snake Plant rewards me with  lots of little white  flowers blooming on long stems, nearly  every year. I would say this is a plant that keeps on giving – for a lifetime. I expect one day this plant will be handed down in the family for another generation to enjoy. I’ve given starts off of it to family members over the years, too.

For additional information on growing Snakeplant and other succulents, please visit the Old Farmer’s Almanac.  You can read much more about how to care for your own Snake Plant.

I’d love to hear from YOU –

Do you have a Snake Plant?

I hope I have encouraged you to give SNAKE PLANT  a try.  Refer to the great article in the Old Farmers Almanac Newsletter for everything you need to know about this and many other plants you can grow in your home.  

Read MORE – Click Here!

Thank you for visiting  SCAN-a-BLOG today!

I appreciate your visits and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Leave me a comment or a question. I always respond to them.

My e-mail:  riverwoman@zoominternet.net

Photos by Lynda McKinney Lambert.  “my Snake Plant”

Copyright 2019. Lynda McKinney Lambert

Click Here to see my Books.

Friday Favs – Aloe Vera: Winter Delights

Post 151

11 January 2019

 

Friday Favs: Aloe Vera: Winter Delights

 

I often begin my morning by checking

the daily issue of the Old Farmer’s Almanac –

I receive a Newsletter which  comes silently

each day

in my mailbox.

First,

I check the front page for the poem of the day.  The featured poem, or fragment of a poem or proverb or quote always has a beautiful photograph or art work that goes with it.  To see a photo with some creative text is  inspiring to me.   Do you enjoy seeing an artistic image with a poem?  I think it is a WIN-WIN when there are TWO CREATIVE WORKS side-by-side.

How do YOU feel about that?

I think of  a POEM PLUS PHOTO  as a

MARRIAGE MADE IN HEAVEN.

Word + Image = ART!

Below: Photo by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

succulents_1

Today –

I spotted some photos of  a type of succulent plant that I love.

I bought my first Aloe Vera about twenty years ago at a rare plant store in Georgia. We were visiting our daughter who lived in Georgia at that time.

The Rare Plant store  was a thrill for us to find.  I never was in such a  a store that sold rare plants – we purchased a few of them and a container to plant them in. This purchase was how  I started my succulent collection.

I bought a shallow terra-cotta planter that looks something like a pie dish.  The circular planter  is wide at the top and shallow – only about 3 inches deep. I still have the dish I purchased  and I still have several types of Aloe Vera plants.

Aloe Vera plants brighten our  rooms

from late fall to early spring. 

As soon as I am sure winter frosts are over,  my plants go outside to live on our wraparound porch for about 6 months a year.  They thrive in the bright light of the porch, yet they are protected from  rain and direct sunlight.  It is important to keep the plants out of the rain  because they will get too wet and begin to rot.  The need to be in containers of terra-cotta for good  drainage.

With good care you can have your Aloe Vera plants for many years.

Everything you ever want to know about t Aloe Vera Plants

Here is a poem I wrote when my Partridge Breasted Aloe was blooming.

“Partridge Breasted Aloe”

She thrust her pointed daggers

upward and outward

concave deep green leaves

adorned with white spots

front and back.

Basks in winter sunshine.

from a center core at the base

spiny and plump

with white designs

on the spruce green leaves.

 

Winter is flowering season

one long stem bursts above

like a quiet barn swallow

shooting up from the center

of a rosette in the springtime

one salmon pink flower

fills my mornings with a delicate scent

no fragrance can match

the fragile beauty of her perfume.

 

Partridge Breast is a sun worshipper

thrives in the south-facing window

prefers to drink less in winter.

 

Partridge Breast is the Queen of my collection

succulents and cacti, my delights.

Partridge Breasted Aloe brings

a sense of peace to my home.

When spring rains turn towards

Summer’s cat-like days

my succulent friends spend their

vacation on my sun-drenched porch

where no grooming is necessary.

By Lynda McKinney Lambert, 2017.

Previously Published:

Naturewriting, Literary Magazine -, Feb. 13, 2018

Behind Our Eyes: A Literary Sunburst – Anthology #3. 2019

Please SHARE this post with your Social Media Friends.

I only ask that you print the complete article with the copyright documentation at the end – as it is here.  Share the Happiness!

I LOVE YOU FOR  THAT!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RIVER

River

What comes to your mind

when you say the word,

“RIVER?”

I live on a ridge overlooking a winding 50-mile long creek in western PA.

This special place in my heart  is called,

“The Connie”

by local people, like me.

Others know this as the Connoquenessing Creek.

I have writing of my love affair with this river all my life.

I found a poem today on a blog. In this poem, I can feel  memories and love for this river.

I am glad to re-blog this poem so that I can enjoy  it today on SCAN.

I love the use of “hair” and desire that is wind-swept through this poem. It is memorable. Thanks for sharing.

I’d like you to visit this blog link  and read it, too.

Red the poem below and please respond with a comment on your own idea of what a RIVER means to YOU. Thank you!

Read “River” now!

If you like the poem, please leave a comment for the poet.

Spread the Happiness.

I LOVE YOU FOR THAT!

Published by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

You can visit my story about my favorite creek here in western Pennsylvania Read it here!

River, I hear you call me to you,
Gone are the days when I walked
On your grassy banks, the wind in my hair,
But still I hear your song,
The air thick with desire,
If just for one more time I could come

On summer days I would often come
Finding peace as I watched you
Around, all that I could desire
My spirits lifted as I walked
Deep within a joyous song
As the wind tossed my hair

Wayward always was my hair
As I felt each season come
Accompanied by a different song
That I sang as I danced beside you
Many miles over time I walked
To walk was always my deep desire

Now I am filled with a deeper desire
So different is my hair
No miles now will ever be walked
Never again will I come
But I never will lose my love for…

View original post 87 more words

April’s Benefits

 April’s Benefits Arrived

with the Spring Showers

Post #78 on this blog!

 

 

Today: I stand on the edge of the END of APRIL

I begin thinking of the CHANGES this time in the cycle of life can give us. I wrote a blog post  on SCAN in April 2015. I looked back at that post from 3 years ago and edited it.

 April whispers,  “Move on!”

 

Bright spring flowers flourish all around us by mid-April.

I bought a little pot of yellow tulips recently. They brightened our dining room table and made me feel happy every time I glanced at them. I am not a gardener so I enjoy buying potted plants and floral bouquets throughout the year with the changing seasons. April’s flowers sparkle with brilliance in dazzling yellow daffodils, tulips in a range from vivid red and coral, to soft pink and white. By the end of April, Pennsylvania’s grassy meadows will be covered with blankets of  purple-blue violets.

 

Our walk home from grade school took a bit longer when I was a little girl.

Our rural home was nearly a mile from the school and  we walked along a meandering path morning and afternoon. By mid-April we found the delightful blooming violets in the fields.The small, fragrant blooms beckoned my sister and me to come closer!

 

We forgot that we were supposed to walk directly home after school

on those long-ago spring days as we stooped down low, extended our eager hands, and began picking violets to take back home with us. The hot afternoon sun beat down on us as we gathered a fist full of the fragile delights. Once home with our treasured flowers, we put them in  little glass jelly jars. Our bouquets remained in a special space on our kitchen windowsill. To this day, many decades later, I still remember the joy of small wildflowers in the house

April signaled that it is now the beginnings of new life surging in Nature. 

On mornings like this one, I take leisurely walks with the dogs. I became conscious of the subtle changes today. After a long lasting winter this year, each new spring day seems especially precious as it brings warmth, sunshine, budding bushes and trees.

We forget we have several senses  that give  us information.

We dwell primarily on the visual stimulation and distractions.  I am legally blind and the entire world is a diffusion of shadowy forms that are distorted, foggy impressions. The positive aspect of sight loss is that I am more aware of  a variety of nuances I missed out on when I was fully sighted. I was too focused on looking and learning only through my eyes.

 

On my morning walk,  I listened carefully

to low sounds of an owl singing its final notes as the sunshine brought strong light to this new day. I thought about the owl and imagined it must be celebrating the end of a fruitful night of hunting for food.  It sounded content.

While the owl can settle down and relax to have a nice sleep for the day, I am just beginning my day. I breathe deeply and felt the coldness on my face and hands. My face tingled with the cold breeze and my hands reminded me they are exposed and I have not brought along a pair of gloves to warm them up on this hour-long walk.

But, I am not so concerned with the coolness of the morning today.

Instead, my thoughts move on to the meaning of spring and how each day is bringing changes to the world around me. The cold air  is just right for this new day. I reach down occasionally to tell my dog, “Good Girl! Heel. Good Heel. Good Girl!.” She glances up at me, and quickly looks back at the path before her and sniffs the air. When we come to a wooded place, near an abandoned mill, I relax her leash and allow her to enjoy tramping in the winter packed leaves that lay all around the trees. She digs down into them  and pushes the soggy leaves aside. She seeks direct passage to the scent that caught her attention. Eventually, I pull her back to heel position and we continue on for the second half of our morning travels. We turn the bend to head back towards home together.

***

I know that we often think of January as a time of new beginnings.

After all, it marks the New Year. Perhaps we might rethink this idea when we find ourselves walking in the early morning in April, with the warming of spring sunshine on our bodies. April truly is the time of new beginnings. April whispers to us,  “move on!”

April affirms life and growth

We can DISCOVER, RECOVER, and REVISE our life.

__________

This essay is brought to you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems being published.

Lynda’s  Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

this blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright April 29, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Visit me:  www.lyndalambert.com

Author:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage: Poems, Kota Press, 2003

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017

First Snow : Chapbook, is ready for publication.

Editors: contact me for information & viewing.

 

 

Solitude

When from our better selves we have too long
Been parted by the hurrying world, and droop,
Sick of its business, of its pleasures tired,
How gracious, how benign is Solitude!  

—Hermit

 

I arrived at the Hambidge Center  in Rabun Gap, GA in the summer of 1988. It was late at night.  In the darkness, I drove into the driveway after my long journey from western Pennsylvania. I walked  to the main house where I met the manager  who would take me to where I would live  for the next month. I was going to be doing a Residency  and would be given a studio and place to live where I could do my art every day.  It was a great opportunity and a dream come true for me.

My guide  said, “I hope you like isolation.” My reply was, “Oh, yes! I love isolation.” The fact is, I did not have an inkling what isolation was but it sounded good to me.

Of course, I had no idea what isolation truly was for I had just arrived at this isolated art colony deep in the Georgia mountains. My normal life was back in Pennsylvania where I managed my busy home and family.  I cooked meals from scratch every day for my husband and 5 children. My homemade pies were famous among the ladies at my church.   The first thing I did each morning was 3 loads of Laundry.  In between the layers of  the business of taking care of husband, kids, dogs, cats, and anything else that came up, I was a non-traditional student pursuing the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree.  Every spare moment I could find, I painted.  Painting was my obsession.

Driving up the steep mountain road, I followed his car.  Then we turned onto a pathway to the isolated little house where I would be living and working.  After the man left me there, alone, in the middle of the Blue Ridge Mountains – in utter darkness – I began to get an idea of what solitude would be like. While I was excited to be there, to have this opportunity, I was also stuck with the reality (and fear) of solitude.

My life was changing. I was diagnosed with breast cancer just 2 months before this trip.  And, my father died 2 weeks before the day I found myself alone at night in a strange place where I would live for the next month. My nerves were a frazzle.

 

But, the month I spent there, away from everyone and everything that was my normal life  was one of the most productive times in my creative life.  In this mountain solitude,  I was united with my “better self.”  Twenty-nine years later, I remain at peace  and solidly united with my “better self.”

Article and Photography by Lunda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright, May 16, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Lynda  McKinney Lambert

.Front Cover

Blogger:

Author:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage (Kota Press), 2002.

   

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017 

Lynda is a Peer Adviser  and writes articles on sight loss and blindness for  Vision Aware Blog

CONTACT ME: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 Author – Blogger – Visual Artist

Red December

This frigid yet refreshing morning inspired me to write a poem. I wrote about a favorite COLOR

– RED –

And I wanted to describe my morning walk

in the darkness with my dogs.

__________

Red December

New-fallen snow glimmers in pre-dawn darkness

slender red barberries dangle from thin bare branches

I shuffle my feet, dig in to feel solid ground

near the place where my Father’s red roses

are surrounded by pillows of snow

slumbering safe in dark red December.

 

My heavy suede boots part the snow

It’s too early for the red cardinals

“Where do they go at night?”

A sharp wind makes me huddle deeper into my bright

red boucle’ jacket

while my two dogs search random trails

follow the long marks, meander downhill.

 

 

On a crisp day in mid-December

I desire red raspberry jam on warm toast

Linger by the tall pampas grass

weighted down to the ground with icy snow

I think of strawberry Sundays with whipped cream

I recall wearing Neiman Marcus Red lipstick and

dancing all night in

hot red stilettos and tight blue jeans.

 

 

We turn around – for the return home

the dogs circle in the frozen pachysandra patches

stiff, brown-green  shrunken leaves.

In memories I see my neighbor walking to her car

she wears a cranberry red hat, worsted red wool coat, flat, scarlet red shoes

carries a true-red leather handbag like the one I bought last Sunday.

 

I watched her from the upstairs window.

In her 80s, she revealed how to live a gallant life.

 

No cars pass us on the country road  this morning in red December

Where it is perpetual winter.

 

By Lynda McKinney lambert. Copyright 2016. All rights reserved.

This is a FREE-FORM poem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania Spring

Gallery

This gallery contains 5 photos.

Pennsylvania Spring The final week of May in Pennsylvania Photos from my early morning walk. Rhododendrum  is a STAR at this time of year. Look for it in shady places, forests and woodlands.             Delicate … Continue reading

Nature: House of Worship

Introducing Kentucky Artist and Author,  Tammy Ruggles~

Tammy is my GUEST BLOGGER for the month.

Ruggles_Photo_Young (2)

Nature: House of Worship

by Tammy Ruggles

While growing up and attending a small country church, I always sensed that there was more than one way to worship the Lord, and this was by communing with Him in nature.

At the age of 12 or 13, my dog and I would walk around the 100 acres of my grandparents’ farm as I read the Bible and let the passages soak in. I didn’t quite understand the meaning of Romans 1:20 but felt it inside nevertheless. At that young age, if I had to point to one thing that proved God’s existence, to me at least, it was nature. I’m sure it’s that way for a lot of Christians or even those without a religion.

This isn’t to say that I worship the creation more than the Creator. No. In fact, creation is one of the things that speaks to me about the power and existence of the Supreme Creator.

Ruggles_Photo_Sunset Sky (2)

 

Whether a blooming flower, a singing bird, or a fiery sunset, God is in it. The whole universe is His canvas, and look what He paints.

Nature works together in perfect harmony, from the top of the higher species to the lower. I think we humans want that, deep down. I don’t think we really want chaos, but peace. But so many factors are at work that put a stumbling block in front of us.

Once in a while I pray for peace. Not just in a general, universal sense. But in a personal, one-on-one sense too. So much strife going on with those around us. When was the last time we unplugged from all the gadgets and just took a walk to commune with God and even ourselves?

I think it actually recharges us, giving us nourishment to meet each day with renewed strength, hope, and faith.

We live in challenging times, and it will help us to live as close to the Lord as we know how, and to worship Him in all the ways that are pleasing to him—serving Him and each other.

Ruggles_Photo_AcrosstheWay

I love the churches I grew up in but have always strongly felt that we don’t have to have walls in order to worship God. God has no walls, and neither does nature. Nature is one of my favorite ways to feel close to Him, and I capture His power and beauty with my camera.

Romans 1:20: For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse

**

Tammy Ruggles Bio: Tammy Ruggles is a legally blind photographer, artist, and writer living in Kentucky. Her first paperback book, Peace, was published in 2005 by Clear Light Books.