Categories
art Gifts of the Spirit Walking by Inner Vision Writing

Give me some LOVE TODAY…

 

 

Post # 249

November 6, 2020

 

GIVE  ME SOME LOVE

TODAY!

 

Lynda McKinney Lambert 

Gifts of the Spirit  Blog

 

Photo shows a Stack of 3 gift boxes.
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

I am thinking about

The Book Cover-of-the-Month Contest

 

 

The book Cover features a detail of western Pennsylvania wild flower – Yellow Crown Beard.  Photo by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

 

Lynda is a visually impaired artist and author.  She is a retired professor of fine art and humanities at  Geneva College, located in Beaver Falls, PA. She lost her sight in 2007 but this did not stop her from pursuing a new career in writing.  This book was her first book published after profound and permanent sight loss!

Despite profound sight loss, Lynda continued to make art and write books full-time since her retirement from teaching.  She has 4 books on Amazon at this time and is working on 2 new books for publication in 2021.

PLEASE VOTE TODAY for MY BOOK COVER!

I LOVE YOU FOR THAT!

You can show me some love today

by VOTING

for my BOOK COVER – it is FREE and EASY.

VOTE HERE!

 

Photo of book cover, Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems. The cover is deep dark green, with a brilliant yellow wildflower - the flower is a Yellow Crown Beard. Lynda photographed the flower in the woods on one of her daily walks.
Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems.     The  Front Cover of this book is a photo of  Yellow Crown Beard.      Lynda McKinney Lambert is the photographer of this photo, taken in the woods near her home in western Pennsylvania. Bright yellow flower on a deep green background.

 

 

My book is Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems.

If my book cover comes inn at the top 100 book covers today,

it will move on to the next round of competition.

Vote NOW!

 

I NEED YOUR VOTE to MAKE it TODAY.

*

Photo: Lynda stands with her display of books at a book-signing event in Pennsylvania.  2019.

 

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright November 6, 2020. All Rights Reserved.

Contact Lynda and please share happiness – Share this post with your Friends.

Who is???  Lynda McKinney Lambert

Lynda’s Book Reviews

Categories
art Gifts of the Spirit Writing

Poetry, Art and Space

Post #229

July 7, 2020

Poetry, Art

and Space

by Lynda McKinney Lambert

Copyright July 7, 2020. All rights reserved.

Recently, someone wrote to me with a question about how I read a poem using technologies for the blind.

I have a visual impairment and cannot read by looking at a page.  Instead, after I write a poem, I can see it on a computer screen that has a black background with white text. It must be blown up – 8 times normal.  I have a screen reader that reads the work to me, also.

 

When I want to do a presentation to a group in a public setting. I put my poems on a device that is a digital recorder. It is small, and fits into the palm of my hand.  I have previously recorded my poems, one line at a time, onto the device.  I use an earpiece, and with just the touch of a button, I can hear the poem.  I speak what I hear – line by line – and this is how I do a presentation. It works for me.

Question:  How do you eliminate the spaces between lines where the machine tells you what to say?

I am not sure what you are asking with this question.

This implies to me that you believe there is something undesirable  about a space or moments, when I read a poem out loud.

Do you mean the use of space when reading a poem?

Or, in viewing an art work?

Is it the use of space when writing the poem or creating a work of art?

 

Does filling spaces mean a continuous stream of chatter?

Is it like watching TV programming or listening to the radio?

No, it is not a commercial concern for filling up space with something else.  I view the space as a shape in time.

 

 

In writing and in art, space is an important thing to recognize and experience.  It gives us room to think and discover, at the same time we are reading, viewing, feeling  or listening.

Silent spaces are crucial to poetry – in writing a poem,, reading a poem aloud, and contemplating meaning. Begin to think of space as an actual place – it is a LANDSCAPE as tangible as a TREE , or  RIVER.

 

In the poetry and art classrooms, space is essential. Long silences are important as students become a co-creator with the author or the artist who created the work they are viewing.

Understanding goes much deeper than speech.

 

I am very aware of space when I read – I want to be patient and take time for space to be experienced.

Space allows for breath – and it is breath that is the scaffolding on which the poem exists. I never read by thinking about “a line.”   I am much more intent on breath and space when I read anything. It takes many years to begin to understand that in reading a poem, one must learn to fall into it – to lay in it, to travel deeply into it physically and conceptually.

The poem/art requires the entire body to get to an understanding of it.

 

My work is influenced by Japanese ideals of balance and meaning.

 

For instance, I have a large Zen Meditation Garden which I tend daily. Traditionally, this type of garden is the opposite of what most people think of as a garden.

No flowers.

No waterfall or fountain.

No decorations.

It is about the entire space.

It is a complete world inside of the perimeter of the short wall of hand- cut barn stones

Instead the garden is about symmetry, textures, and nature as a metaphor.

Every space is an important element and part of the whole concept of stillness and timelessness.

 

Empty space is very important in art and in poetry – yet, it is not really empty. It holds meaning.

Think of Japanese woodcut prints. Empty space holds as much – or even more – meaning as the imagery does.

Filling up every  space is cluttering. 

I think visual and auditory space is as important as words. Space gives time for contemplation and anticipation in a way that is powerful.

 

As I read aloud, I have no thoughts of eliminating space. It is the same if I am reading quietly in my office or before an audience. I am speaking my own words and thoughts.

*

Take a LOOK – Smashwords – E-book

READ a 20% SAMPLE for FREE.

Star Signs: New and Selected Poems

By Lynda McKinney Lambert

 Click on the link of my name, above to SEE MY BOOK on SMASHWORDS –

Star Signs: New and Selected Poems

See More

Lynda Lambert covers a wide terrain of subjects and topics in this new book, from lights to legends to seasons, treating us to images and metaphors about plants, people and weather. She opens this large collection with the title poem, Star Signs, which walks us through the alphabet as it digs through thoughts, emotions and observations, “Using star signs to map out new terrain.”

Throughout this book of poems, these gems of poetic creation shimmer like beads on her fabric art, like bold brush strokes of color on her paintings, and reflect light like the gemstones on her prize–winning piece of mixed–media fiber artwork. It seems this entire collection is like a multifaceted mural.

Her attentiveness to nature and strong reflections from memory have woven from a collage of remnants a beautiful tapestry for us. It offers a wonderful feast for the eyes and the mind.

—Wesley D. Sims, author of Taste of Change
*

Here is a poem from this book:

Painting in Mid–October

Autumn’s morning light revealed changes
Undermined the scarlet–red palette
Taking center stage on the painting
Undulating rain cast gray–violet hues
Misty diffusion brought a new perspective
Not anticipated yesterday
Aroused the softened brushstrokes
Layered over the primed canvas.
Dying is a careful arrangement
A graceful staged performance
Yellow leaves are faithful dancers
Spectacular choreography!

 

*

 

 

Available ebook format at SMASHWORDS.

 

SMASHWORDS ASKED  LYNDA to describe her WRITING PROCESS.

READ her RESPONSE to the QUESTION!

 

$2.99 on SMASHWORDS today!

 

I work back and forth between ADDING and SUBTRACT ING.

I BUILD and I DESTROY.
Writing poetry, for me,  is a dance with materials – senses – images.

I order chaos and find balance.

Lynda McKinney Lambert – Smashwords,  March 9, 2019.

 

$2.99 on SMASHWORS 

NOW

Read it!

*

My Books

Amazon Authors Page

Star Signs: New & Selected Poems

Website

FaceBook

Recent Anthology Publication

 

Copyright 2020. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 My MISSION STATEMENT

  • I am the keeper of memories. I distil and share them through my art and writing.
  • I reveal what is forgotten, lost, or unseen.
  • I bring “Gifts to the King” through spare poems and thoughtful personal essays.

 

Categories
art Lynda McKinney Lambert Writing

About Your JOB Description

  Post #212
31 August 2019

Do you know what your J O B in life is?

ONLY YOU CAN Do It!

 

 

Below:  Photos of Lynda at work in her fiber art studio.

Top Photo shows a collection of beads she will be using to create a talisman.

 

 

Bottom Photo: Lynda at work using her Acrobat CCTV.  

Lynda, at work on a fiber art project. She uses an Acrobat CCTV, which magnifies the tiny beads and stitches for her on a closed circuit television screen. Lynda is visually impaired and uses a variety of technologies for the blind to do her intricate work in art and writing.

 

 

 

Your JOB DESCRIPTION is CUSTOM MADE  for YOU!

Have you contemplated what God has for YOU to do in this world?

I received this note yesterday from a dear friend 

who has always inspired me to be the best “ME” that I can be.

Let this be a reminder, Lynda, that our job is to do our job and outcomes are up to God.   Someday you will be amazed when you find out how many people you have inspired.

~Dr. Ann Paton, E-mail message, August 30, 2019.

As an Artist and Writer, I have a very clear JOB DESCRIPTION.
I preserve MEMORIES and I celebrate BEAUTY.
This is MY JOB DESCRIPTION.

“Do the WORK.

And, Keep on DOING THE WORK.”

That’s it!

God takes it from there – my WORK is COMPLETE when I have shared it and only GOD knows WHO will benefit from it.

The PEOPLE my work will reach and what they will receive from it – is not my  JOB.

This article is written and shared by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

See all of my books right here!

My newest book is   Star Signs: New & Selected Poems, KDP, 2019.

Lots more about Lynda’s books – click here!

 

Lynda’s  SMART TIP:

The holidays are not-so-far-away.

Perhaps you would like to purchase a few copies of my books,  for gifting  this year.  Several people have contacted me and want me to sign the books they will be gifting and I can do that for you – just let me know how many you want and send me a list of the names you want put into the book.

My interview with  the amazing author, A. L. butcher,  was published on her blog.  I think you’ll know more about me after you read this interview.

I appreciate the opportunity of sharing my life with friends and supporters.

Thank you, A.J. Butcher,  for this feature article.  I really enjoyed doing it with you.

A Day in the Life of… Lynda McKinney Lambert: 

Read it Here!


Lynda
MFA, West Virginia University
BFA and MA from Slippery Rock University of PA

Lynda  was professor of fine arts and humanities at Geneva College, Beaver Falls, PA until her retirement in 2008. Since that time,

Lynda  writes and makes her mixed media fiber art full-time from See it here!

___

 

Lynda authored 3 published books:

*** Star Signs: New and Selected Poems, KDP, 2019.

*** Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems,  CreateSpace, 2017.

*** Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage,  2003, Kota Press.  See it Here!

 

 

For signed copies of Lynda’s books, inquire here:

E-mail: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 Visit Lynda’s Blogs:

SCAN-a-BLOG:  See it Here!

Walking by Inner Vision:  Read it Here!

 

104 River Road, Ellwood City, PA 16117

 Share the Happiness

I LOVE YOU for THAT!

***

Categories
art

Lynda’s Blogs and More…

______

____

Knitting15_Scarf9_4
Lynda Lambert – My Pink Scarf

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright 2016.. All Rights Reserved.

__________

Lynda’s 2 blogs:

“Walking by Inner Vision” Link:  Walking by Inner Vision Blog
“SCANdalous – Recollections” Link:  SCANdalous – Recollections Blog
Contact Lynda:  riverwoman@zoominternet.net
_____

Lynda’s Bio

Lynda McKinney Lambert is the author of “Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage” published by  Kota Press. To order this book, click here:  Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage
Lynda  authors two blogs on writing, the humanities, arts, and faith.
She is a freelance writer and her poetry and essays appear in numerous books and literary journals.  She is a retired professor of fine arts and humanities and she exhibits her fiber arts in exhibitions worldwide.
Currently, Lynda  has two books in development for publication in 2016.
Contact me:  riverwoman@zoominternet.net

If you would like a signed copy of my book, contact me for information.

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright 2016. All rights reserved.
Categories
Music Writing

The Cryptic Calling: an author’s journey Along an Unmarked Path

Meet  October’s Guest Blogger 

 Donna W. Hill

The Cryptic Calling: an author’s journey

Along an Unmarked Path

 

Blog15_DHill_Redwoods_Donna-&-Hunter-on-path-Glowing-Mist_by_Rich_Hill

This photo of Donna W. Hill with her guide dog, Hunter in ” Glowing Mist in the Redwoods” is by Rich Hill

 

It was 1954. A four-year-old girl with blond banana curls was in the living room. The house was quiet. Her parents were at work; her brother and grandmother in the backyard. She felt relieved to be alone. She didn’t know, nor would she for 14 years, that she was already legally blind.

 

The voice startled her. She stopped breathing, her ears scanning the house. But, it wasn’t necessary. She had felt the message settle into her spirit.

 

“You are here to do something important involving music.”

 

What did it mean? She instinctively took it as an anointing from God, though one with a disquieting lack of detail.

 

The Calling

 

That four-year-old was yours truly, and at sixty-five, that message still puzzles, intrigues and guides me. Initially, I assumed it meant that I was to become famous for my music. I didn’t share the experience, but I begged my parents to get me an accordion.

 

“You’re too small.”

 

Always a literalist, I was amused in second grade when — instead of the “massively-huge” accordion” — they bought me a piano . I progressed quickly, my nose on the brightly lit book, developing my memorization skills.

A Rude Awakening

 

Later that fall, I was selected for the Christmas concert. I was sure my ship had arrived. I was, however, wildly mistaken. I soon realized that there would be major obstacles.

“Go up to the top row of the risers.”

I was in the auditorium for our first rehearsal. I didn’t know what risers were, but I was soon on a contraption that shook and rattled with no way to steady myself. I didn’t understand how tunnel vision impacted my balance, and neither did anyone else.

Almost instantly, the director ordered me down, dismissing me from the group. She wouldn’t give me a few minutes to work it out or let me stand on the floor. The lesson wasn’t lost on me; although my voice was good enough, something more important about me wasn’t.

 

That spring, my teacher took my workbook away, despite my above average grades. She wasn’t comfortable watching me struggle to read. The other shoe dropped the following fall. I was placed in “Special Class,” where only first-grade large-print books awaited me. The thrust of my education was to fulfill the tiniest assignments, after which I was encouraged to play with pre-school toys.

 

My ophthalmologist was outraged. I was removed from “Special Class” and placed into a normal third grade class. The teacher, displeased with the placement, delighted in allowing open bullying of me and punished the girl who read me the questions from the board.

A Mission Slipping Away

 

By sixth grade, my vision was worsening, and piano music was far more complicated. My ability to memorize it was at a breaking point. I did what I thought any self-respecting twelve-year-old would do. I quit.

 

How was I supposed to interpret what I had heard in the living room? For the first (and far from the last) time, I considered the possibility that it could have merely been the ravings of a deranged mind.

In Search of a Miracle

 

Had God changed His mind? Or, perhaps, I needed to do something else first. If so, I knew what that was — get normal sight. It was obviously impossible to be successful without it.

 

Years before hearing televangelists discuss healing, I somehow knew I had to believe it would happen. Every morning for months, before I opened my eyes, I thanked God for restoring my sight, imagining the bright and detailed world that awaited me. My eyes, however, opened to dimness and confusion.

 

Progress and Compromise

 

At fourteen, I was devastated without music in my life. I asked for and received a guitar. Though I was too shy to share them, I started writing songs, beginning the inexorable link in my life between music and language.

 

In Junior High and High School, the bullying became more physical. The increase in work coupled with declining central vision necessitated a prioritizing of my work — literature and science were in; history and math out. Braille and recorded books were never discussed. I was legally blind in a world where it was more important to read and navigate with your eyes, regardless of how many mistakes you made, how much time it took, how sick you got or how many other things fell by the wayside, than to learn nonvisual skills.

 

The overt bullying stopped when I entered college. Nevertheless, I had lost the reading vision in my better eye that summer and was ill-equipped to take full advantage of the college experience. For the first time, however, I used recorded books and readers.

Reawakening the Dream

 

After graduation, I tried to make up the deficit. I trained with my first guide dog and learned Braille. I would pursue my dream of being a self-supporting musician — initially, as a street performer in Philadelphia’s Suburban Station.

 

I had my own apartment, kept an organic garden complete with a compost pile, baked whole grain bread and made everything from soup and tomato sauce to pesto and spanakopita. I started performing at schools, churches and other venues. I wanted my audiences to have a comfortable experience with a blind person and learn a bit about how we do things. I released two albums — “Rainbow Colors” and “Harvest.”

 

“If I had healed you back then,” said the same voice, “You would have never known that blindness didn’t have to limit you.”

 

Sidetracked

 

While recording my third album, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. After treatment, Rich and I married, and I finished the project. Just as “The Last Straw” was coming out, I found another cancerous lump. The drain on our energy and finances prompted a change in plans.

 

What about my mission? Had I done what I was supposed to do? Perhaps it had something to do with the many small contacts I’d had over the years. Maybe it was the man who wore out his copy of “Rainbow Colors” while recovering from an auto accident. Maybe it was one of the thousands of kids who had seen my school programs. I was well aware by then that we are all here to do something important. putting forth our best efforts and walking in love is the greatest, most difficult and most rewarding mission.

 

I didn’t give up. Blind people still aren’t being welcomed with open arms. Education, digital accessibility and unemployment remain major problems. I learned to use a computer with text-to-speech software to pursue another dream. In an effort to promote acceptance among the general public, my novel The Heart of Applebutter Hill was designed to allow the reader an intimate look into the mind of a blind teenager, embroiled in an exciting adventure. And, the music angle? Abigail’s a shy songwriter.

 

Blog15_DHill_THAH-w-multiple-Amarilis-blooms-1-22-15-010

Donna’s novel The Heart of Applebutter Hill, an educator-recommended diversity and anti-bullying classroom resource for middle school and older readers, is available in print, eBook versions and accessible formats for readers with print disabilities. For more information and to follow Donna’s blog, visit:

http://DonnaWHill.com

 

 

Photo by Rich Hill. Photos used with permission of the photographer. Thanks so much!

 

 

 

Donna is a singer and songwriter.  Click on the LINK below to enjoy listening  to Donn as she sings, “Love of my Life.”

 

**

Special THANKS to Rich and  Donna W. Hill for allowing me feature this story on the blog today!

Copyright 2015.  All Rights Reserved.

Categories
art Christianity Writing

United by Stories – by Beckie Horter

Introducing my GUEST BLOGGER for May – Beckie  Horter

I am delighted to feature  a writer I met a number of years ago when she attended the college where I taught.  Beckie is a graduate of Geneva College, Beaver Falls, PA. We  reconnected recently and she wrote this GUEST BLOG ARTICLE exclusively for SCANdalous! And, here she is……

Blog15_SCAN_May23_Horter_FieldPlower

United by Stories

Our hearts were made for stories. Fearfully and wonderfully made, said the Psalmist. And it’s true:  we were built for giving and receiving stories as a means of soul sustenance. It’s the gift of truth told, lessons learned, and humor offered to lighten the daily load.

I’ve been noticing the power of stories lately as I spend time with my 86-year-old mother. Her short-term memory is terrible. But her capacity for long ago stories lives on. She remembers days on the farm, walking to school, and what an old woman wore on the beach in 1950—a full slip instead of a bathing suit. Scandalous!

Those are the best conversations to have with her…she’s comforted by those tales. They are real to her and part of who she is. Just as all our experiences become part of who we are and what we share with the world.

“I like a good story, well told. That is why I am sometimes forced to tell them myself,” said Mark Twain.

I can relate! Even though I am shy and introverted—not the bold speaker Mark Twain was—I am often called upon to tell a story. One girlfriend, after I haven’t seen her for a while, will sit me down and say, “Tell me stories!” She wants to know what’s new, of course, but she wants it told in an interesting way.

I am happy to oblige. Telling stories, either on the page or in a small group, brings joy and unity. It takes us on a journey even while we remain perfectly still. Our minds join together for a time, and we imagine scenes and sounds, and smells and tastes that go along with the narrative being told.

When it came time for class plays, I always volunteered to be the narrator. Others wanted to have a big speaking role and fought to be the main character, but I wanted to tell the story.  Because the narrator had the scoop. They kept everyone together, brought the story up to speed, and answered all the questions in the end.

I think Garrison Keillor, a modern-day storyteller, would agree. “Be as crazy as you want to be,” he said. “Just let me tell about it.”

Where do we get this impulse? This need to tell stories?

I believe it comes directly from God. He is the giver of all good things, including stories and imaginations. God’s Word is laden with memorable stories, and it was Jesus’ first choice for teaching the people.

Consider the parable.

Blog15_SCAN_May23_HorterStory_field blog15_SCAN_May23_Photo_field

“A farmer went out to sow his seed,” begins the parable of the sower in Luke 8. From this teaching, we understand that the seed is the Word of God, and there are four types of soil—or hearts—the Word can fall on. Shallow soil, rocky soil, thorny soil, and good soil. In the end, only the good soil, or the heart that has been properly prepared, is the one that will yield a crop for eternal life.

We may conclude from this story that three-fourths of the time the Word is shared, it will not have lasting effect. Wow! So we are not to be discouraged when we don’t see change. Jesus told us that the devil will snatch it away, that some will believe for a time and then fall away, and others will give way to worry, riches and pleasures. This is a cautionary tale, too. We want to have good soil and avoid the pitfalls Jesus warns of.

We get all that from the mental picture of a farmer, seed, soil, thorns, rocks, etc. But, of course, it represents so much more! The truth that we are built for eternal life seeps into our hearts like a healing balm.  We instinctively know it’s right. And it quiets the longing inside us.

A great teacher will always incorporate a story along with the lesson.

Stories work better than lectures.

Our defenses are down and our hearts are open.

And while the points in a lecture quickly fade, a story imprints our memory.

So, as summer kicks off this week, I’m hoping to build my story collection by making new memories. To journey down the road a bit and see new sights, notice something different, talk to a stranger, laugh about a situation, and then come home and tell the story.

Maybe you’ll do the same!

***
Blog15_SCAN_May23_Beckie_portraitBeckie Horter is a Christian blogger and devotions editor for Proverbs 31 Ministries.

After receiving her B.A. in Writing from Geneva College, Beckie worked as a correspondent for the Allegheny Times. There she covered government meetings and wrote feature articles. Telling stories and loving it! She went on to proofread for the paper until a retina condition erased most of her central vision leaving her partially blind.

Following a period of adjustment and seeking the Lord’s will, Beckie once again returned to her passion of writing—albeit slowly. God showed her how to use her remaining vision and continues to open doors to spread His message of hope.

A theme she often explores on her blog,This Abiding Walk, is how God works through the brokenness of our lives. Although the subject matter can be quite serious, Beckie gives her readers comic relief and writes in a truthful and thoughtful way. Read more by Beckie Horter by visiting her blog:

 http://thisabidingwalk.com/author/beckie291beckieann/

Most recently, she’s been delighted to become re-acquainted with her former drawing professor, the colorful Lynda Lambert!  These two find that God works in unusual ways. And they are both enjoying the journey!