Saturday is for Sharing: Patricia Hubschman

 

Post #169

 Good morning to our Readers at

 

SCAN-a-BLOG

 

Lynda:  I am so delighted to welcome a fellow writer and author

 ~Patricia Hubschman ~

19_Trish_Trish with Dog.jpg

Trish is

strolling down the long sidewalk from  the driveway, and passing by the Zen Meditation Garden, on her way to our lovely century-old  home in The Village of Wurtemburg. She has come to rural Western PennsylvANIA  today  for this visit.

We are so excited!

I watch as she steps up onto the  wraparound porch. I feel  glad  that the snow melted so that we did not have to clean sidewalks this morning.  I open the kitchen door and welcome Trish  into our kitchen.  It’s always exciting to meet a new friend.  Miss Opal is waiting here to greet her, also.

Miss Opal_ Trish, it’s nice to welcome you to our home this morning even though it is rather grey and rainy. You can hear the rushing waters of the creek today because it is very high and fast from the melted snow and rain that we always have during the winter months in Pennsylvania. I don’t really like to get wet so I stay inside and just watch  everything from my window in our writing office.  Our home is warm and welcoming every day so we don’t mind the winter season at all. We are excited to visit with you today because  February is the MONTH of LOVE. And, we LOVE BOOKS and AUTHORS.

Lynda_ Yes, Trish, we think  that February is the best time to have you visit us because you also have a new book that is now available. Right?  We wanted to speak with you about the new book publication and we like to hear about your life as a writer,  and other things that make you happy.  I’ve enjoyed meeting you through the Behind Our Eyes Writer’s Group recently.

Trish_ Laughing. Oh, this must be your 2 dogs, Miss Dixie Tulip and Miss Mitchellini?

Miss Dixie Tulip and Miss Mitchellini prance about in circles as Trish steps into the writing office that is just one step down from the kitchen. They love to have company!

 Trish_ Your dogs make me think of my own dog. Her name was Hope and she passed away recently, on January 30. She was quite old, but I loved her so much and I really miss her.

Lynda_ Yes, we love our 2 dogs and our 2 cats. Miss Opal has a sister who lives  here, too. Her name is Miss Bessie, but she doesn’t usually come to greet guests. I am so sorry to learn about Hope and I know how much she meant to you and your husband. I often think about how much company they are and I  could never imagine life  without my furry friends, Bob and I consider them our best friends.  

Miss Opal_ Trish. how about you?  Who would you say is your best friend?

Trish_  My husband, Kevin, is my best friend. We met through an interesting way, a newspaper Personal ad. I submitted my essay about how we met. I called this story, “Meeting My Man,” and I sent my personal love story to   Magnets and Ladders Literary Magazine. I am hoping it might get into the Spring/Summer edition. 

Well,   Mom read a bunch of ads to me.  I sent a ‘form’ letter to the candidates. Kevin responded with a letter. We went back and forth with letters for some time. Finally, we  decided to meet in person.  Four years later we were married and that was twenty-seven years ago.

Lynda_ that is like a very personal True Romance story, Trish. Bob and I got married almost 58 years ago. We will celebrate that day on April 14, this year. That is a lot of Valentine days together.

Miss Opal_ Trish, this makes me wonder, what could you never live without?  I think about what would happen if something I like a lot would go away.  What could I ever do?  Trish, I’m a cautious cat and I  worry about things sometimes. I’m always afraid of losing something that I like a lot.  Like, my cat toys and feather on a stick. . Well, that’s because the dogs might  hide them  and then I’d never find my special toys  again. You know, dogs  like to bury their treasures outside in the garden and I don’t even like to go outside.  It’s just too scary out there and we havRed Tailed Hawks  – they  fly over the woods all the time.

Trish_ I understand.  Beside Kevin, I can’t live without my cochlear implant, the external device. If I have it off my ear or the batteries die, it feels like the whole world goes blank. It’s scary. My speech discrimination is far from 100% but at least with my CI on. I have an idea what ‘s going on around me, even if there’s nothing particularly going on, such as at night after bedtime.

Lynda_ What have you done recently that really made you feel good about yourself? You know, I mean, something that you are so proud of – an accomplishment that makes you smile when you think about it.  I love to hear about special events in my friend’s lives.  I think we all need to celebrate our achievements.

Trish_  I think of  2 things right away.

First, I’m teaching myself how to navigate blogs. I’m sending stories to Patty Fletcher, at Campbell’s Corner. She’s posting them for me.  I’m learning to access blogs and how to read them. I can even  comment  and reply to other readers’ comments, I didn’t even know what a blog was until recently.

Miss Opal_ Well, now you know that even cats write blogs –with some help, of course! And, Patty’s dog, Campbell, is quite famous for his book and his blog at Campbell’s World.

Trish_ Yes, This is true, Miss Opal.    I want to share my writings and my writing life  with other people in this way.

Lynda_   What is your most notable achievement or accomplishment to date?

Trish_ I’d have to say that my second achievement I am proud of is that  I graduated college.

Lynda_ I’d love to hear more about your academic journey.  Higher education is a passion of mine.  I am a retired professor, so I love learning about the academic achievements of  friends. 

 

Trish_ It took me 6 years to earn a four-year degree but I did it and with honors. My first 2 years were at a community college, then I went up to SUNY Albany. That was a difficult school. After that, I transferred to LIU Southampton College as an English-Writing major. I was on the Dean’s List and in the Honors Society. I am proud to say,  I had the highest GPA in my junior class. In 1988, I graduated Cum Laude.

Lynda_ Can you talk a little bit about  how a dual handicap affects everyday  life and what you do?

Trish_ I’m deafblind and I have a walking/balance problem. I’ve had a cochlear implant since 2004. I think I’m a more compassionate person because of this and it shows in my writing. I love  “LOVE”  and Romantic  novels..  I always was a dreamer because I was a shy kid.

Lynda_ Oh yes, I wanted to be sure to ask you about your latest book, Trish. Would you please give me an outline of your latest book so we can share it here on Saturday is for Sharing?

Trish: Yes, I would love to!  My new book is a Romantic Suspense Novel ,

Stiff Competition (Miss America)

It is a Tracy Gayle Mystery novel.

Lynda_  How is it available? 

Trish_ e-book ($2.99) and print ($9.50) on Amazon and other bookselling sites.

My book has  227 pages in print.   Your readers can find more information on my book, as well as the  free text sample,  https://www.dldbooks.com/hubschman/

 

Here’s the outline or synopsis of my book. It gives you the feeling for the story, I think.   

About the Book:

America’s favorite rock band, Tidalwave, is playing the Miss America pageant. Band leader Danny Tide is emceeeing the event. All is going according to schedule. The judges have picked the 10 semi–finalists.

Suddenly, everything comes to a halt. Miss New Jersey is missing. Nobody knows what happened to her or where she is.

Danny calls his longtime PI friend, Tracy Gayle, and asks her to come down to Atlantic City to help figure things out. In need of her best friend for personal support and eager to get to another case, Tracy agrees.

There’s an all–out search of the hotels on the boardwalk. They find Miss New Jersey, but it’s not good. Her kidnapping leads to another assault and murder. The big star and the lady PI work together on this one, so that the Miss America pageant can continue as usual.

 

About the Author

Trish Hubschman has published three books with America Star Books: a short story collection of time travel and romance stories called Through Time and the first two books in the Tracy Gayle/Danny Tide series: The Fire and Unlucky Break. Trish attended college at Long Island University’s Southampton campus, earning a BA degree in English with an emphasis in writing. She lives on Long Island with her husband and two dogs.

Trish mentioned that her work is featured on Patty Fletcher’s blog. You van visit this blog by clicking on the link below. There is a LOT of great writings there! Check it out.

Read more articles on Campbell’s World. Visit now!

This Special Feature interview is courtesy of Pennsylvania author, Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright  February 16, 2019..   All rights reserved.

Lynda’s Author Page – Click Here!

Read this article about Lynda on Campbell’s World – Click here!

 

Saturday is for Sharing is a Special Feature Article, coordinated by Lynda and Miss Opal, her feline writing partner. Lynda and Miss Opal live in rural western Pennsylvania in The Village of Wurtemburg.

Lynda is the author of 4 books:

Her first book is: Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage, Kota Press, 2002.

Her second book is:  Walking by Inner vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017.

Lynda’s 3rd book:

 Star Signs: New & Selected Poems – 60 poems.

Her FIRST CHAPBOOK  – first snow –  16 Poems with a Wintry Theme.

Both new books are now available for publication. 

Thank you for visiting with us today. Miss Opal and Lynda McKinney Lambert

Please SHARE:  We LOVE YOU FOR THAT!

Please include copyright information with article. Thanks so much.

Friday Favs: The NEW BOE BLOG SHOWCASE

Post 162

Friday Favs: January 18, 2019 

 

~ Lynda’s Friday Favs ~

The NEW BOE BLOG SHOWCASE

BOE = Behind Our Eyes

Where to Find them?

Perhaps you have not yet heard of Behind Our Eyes, Inc. ?

It is an organization  that hosts a  writers group, specifically for  writers with disabilities.

I’d like to take this opportunity to share the website for the group.

The page containing blog listings from our members is now posted on  the group’s  website.

The direct link is:   https://www.behindoureyes.org/wp/blog-showcase/

*

Do you know about Magnets & Ladders?

It is a literary magazine of Active Voices by writers with disabilities.

 

If you are a writer who has a disability, you may be interested in finding out more about the opportunities provided.  I’ve been a member for a number of years. I am a published author and writer who has significant sight loss.  But, the great thing is that our disabilities do not define us and cannot keep us from being active in the craft that we love.

In addition to the website, there is a writing opportunity 2 times a year to send work to the Magnets & Ladders Literary Publication for consideration.  The website for the organization gives information and guidelines you can read about how you can enter your writing for this magazine. Click here for guidelines.

BONUS:  CASH  AWARDS in Each Category. Enter NOW.

 

BREAKING NEWS…

For the Spring/Summer issue this year – 2019 – there is an additional opportunity for writers who have a focus on Nature and the Outdoors.  The contest will award a $50 cash award for the best poem in this category.  This contest is  a memorial award in honor of the group’s late member, Ernest Jones, who died last year. Ernie served on the board and was an active member of BOE for a number of years.

Visit the guidelines and learn more about how you can enter your work! But hurry, the deadline is coming up in mid-February.

It is free – no charge to enter your work for either competition.

*

WAIT – There is MORE…

Behind Our Eyes has published 2 anthologies.

The  first Behind Our Eyes Anthology came out in 2007.

The second anthology is

Behind Our Eyes: A Second LookClick here for more information.

 

The THIRD ANTHOLOGY is now in process:

Behind Our Eyes: A Literary Sunburst

produced by DLD Books – scheduled for publication in early 2019.

*

The latest addition to the BOE Website is the BLOG SHOWCASE.  All BOE members who write blogs are featured on this SHOWCASE, if they choose to be listed.

Be sure to visit the website and visit the blogs on the page.

I think you will enjoy it very much.  When you visit a blog, make sure you leave a comment so the blogger knows you were there. That means a lot!

*

This article is written by  Pennsylvania Author Lynda McKinney Lambert.

This article was featured on the Friday Favs Special Feature as part of Lynda’s recognition of a variety of her favorite things – stories, organizations, and more.

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright 2019.  All rights reserved.

You are invited to share this post with your friends on Social Media.

My only request is that you print it in its entirety, including copyright information and authors name.

You can find both of Lynda McKinney Lambert’s blogs listed on the New Blog Showcase at BOE.

Share the Happiness!

*

I Love you for That –

 

Saturday is for Sharing – Bruce Atchison

Post #124 – September 8, 2018

Saturday is for Sharing

Series of Guest Authors – #9

Miss Opal & Lynda

Welcome YOU to

Saturday is for Sharing 

_____

Bruce Atchison, Canadian Author

 

 

  

Hi Bruce,   It is a pleasure to have you as a guest today on Saturday is for Sharing.  I’ve enjoyed reading your blog for several years and I also know you through the Behind Our Eyes organization.

You are our first international Guest Author.

I recommend your memoir

Deliverance From Jericho: Six Years in a Blind School

to our readers. I have this book and will quote from the back cover:

Imagine being a disabled child, hastily sent to a boarding school hundreds of miles from home, and being kept there for months at a time.  This was the fate of most physically and mentally impaired students half a century ago.  ntellectuals and governmaent  officials once believed  that the best way to educate “hadicapped youngsters” was to segregate them from the able-bodied population, concentrating those  pupils into large institutions. 

Bruce, I think this is a tremendous book and gives the reader a view into life as you experienced it during those years as a young child. This is a world at most people have never imagined and I found it to be enlightening and moving.

I have enjoyed speaking with you  about our mutual passion for animals, and I know that you are specifically passionate about  rabbits.  So, that’s where I will begin our interview – with a question about the awareness of animals.

___________

Q_ I  know that you have a favorite animal – rabbits!  Are rabbits  a “totem animal” to you?  When did you become aware of the importance of rabbits  in your life?  

Bruce_ I’ve always loved rabbits. They’re shy like me and they’re so picked on in nature. But sadly for our family rabbit, we killed her with kindness. That’s why I wrote my first memoir called

When a Man Loves a Rabbit

My first  book is  a warning to novice bunny owners.

 

In 1996, I found out about

The House Rabbit Society  (Lynda’s note – Learn More about Rabbits at this link:  https://rabbit.org/

and that rabbits can make wonderful house pets for adults. Their information confirmed some things I had already noticed with the rabbits I once had. For example, they like to toilet in one spot. Bunnies dislike chaotic situations but they are social creatures.

_____

 

 

Q_ I also know that you love music. I’ve enjoyed learning so much about a variety of musical genre by reading your blog posts. You give a sample of a piece of music and a performer or group that recorded the particular piece of music, Then, you give some background andhistorical context to that music. Your blog features are enjoyable to listen to,  also educational.  I would say you are a connosouire of modern music.  Do you have a favorite song that brings back good memories for you, Bruce?

 

Bruce_  When Klaatu released their first LP in 1997…

I fell in love with a song called “Little Neutrino.” It combined space rock and synthesizers, plus the vocoder vocals appealed to my love of science fiction.

I also named one of my rabbits after the song.

Neutrino was a feisty black bunny

who was very small and hard to see in dusky rooms.

He also had a knack of slipping through barriers I erected to keep him out of rooms which I hadn’t bunny proofed. Neutrino was three years old when I adopted him and we lived for eighty-two months together.

_____

Q_ What is one topic that you won’t ever choose to write about in the future? Is there something that is “off limits” to you, as a writer?

 In my book, My  Deliverance from Jericho…

Bruce_I told the story of how I was sent to a school for the blind. At age seven, I went there for months at a stretch and was raised by supervisors. I spent six years of my life in that uncaring institution before the government mainstreamed me and other Alberta children.

I learned the hard way that most people can’t relate to my experiences at that school.

My rabbit book was a relative success because I knew my readership. But I misjudged the interest of sighted readers, causing my Jericho book to sell poorly. Only fellow blind people wanted to read what I wrote. But since it cost too much to have the book made into audio or braille versions, and since most blind folks couldn’t afford to pay, few copies sold.

 

Q_ What  is on your “back burner” and waiting for your attention?

Bruce_I’m working on a new book called

You Think You’re Going to Heaven?

Many people who consider themselves Christians aren’t following Christ and have never obeyed him. They feel their good works and showing up at church will gain them entry into paradise but they’ll be turned away. I want every one to know the true way to eternal bliss.

 

My next book won’t be a  memoir. I made that mistake with my third book called How I Was Razed. Most folks don’t care about my experiences at a cultic house church. Even Christians weren’t eager to buy a copy of that book.

 

Q_ What do you have an eye on right now, for your future?

Bruce_I hope to retire in 2021. I’ll relax and enjoy life.

Note from Lynda:

Somehow I cannot imagine that Bruce would be retiring from the writing life. He seems to be an “Energizer Bunny” when it comes to ideas for book and publishing. Personally, I think he will go on, and on, and on….and we will see more books by him in the years ahead.  I surely hope so!

_____

Bio: Bruce Atchison lives in a tiny Alberta hamlet.

He is  almost blind, yet he has written three books and is writing a fourth. Bruce also writes freelance articles since 1997.

His blog posts appear three times a week.

www.bruceatchison.blogspot.com

AND

http://www.bruceatchison.wordpress.com

 

Bruce Atchison

 

batchison@mcsnet.ca

http://www.twitter.com/ve6xtc

http://www.youtube.com/ve6xtc

 

___________

 

_____________________

Dear Readers of SCAN,

Your support of our Featured Guest Authors is  appreciated.

Here’s how YOU can spread the HAPPINESS:

Please  share this article with your friends on Social Media and by Re-Blogging.

You can purchase this book: Gift Giving Season is closing in on us already!

Thanks again for your support of the Authors who are featured on Saturday is for Sharing.

________________

Saturday is for Sharing

is brought to you by

Pennsylvania Author, Lynda McKinney Lambert and her feline writing partner, Miss Opal.

SCAN is owned by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

Saturday is for Sharing is Lynda’s property. You have permission to SHARE this blog post with your FRIENDS on FaceBook.

Copyright: September 8,, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Please share with your Friends on FaceBook and SHARE to your blog. Please Re-Blog this article and spread the HAPPINESS.

I only ask that you re-post the entire article with the copyright information attached.

Leave Miss  Opal and Lynda some comments and let us know what you liked about this feature story today.

 

SHARE Good Thoughts

and Happiness

EVERY day!

 

Saturday is for Sharing – Phyllis Staton Campbell

Post #121

Saturday is for Sharing –

#7 Guest Author

Meet  Phyllis Staton Campbell

Guest Author

Where Sheep May  Safely Graze

 

Phyllis, We are honored today to have you on Saturday is for Sharing weekly event  on SCAN. 

The scope of your creative work in teaching, musical performance, writing and publication is remarkable. You are truly a Renaissance Woman, Phyllis.

Often, I like to begin by asking an author about their name as a way of introduction.  Our readers like to know more about the importance of an author’s name.

Q_ Do you use your own name for your writing projects or do you use a pen name?  What do you think about your name?  What do you think a name represents?

I can’t say that I have strong feelings either pro or con about the name by which I’m called. Conceited soul that I am, I always write using my name. I take pride in my work, and want the world to know it is mine. There is another writer whose name is Phyllis Campbell, so to prevent confusion, I sometimes add my maiden name, making it  Phyllis Staton Campbell.

However, each of us has another name, one that is never spoken, nor appears on a legal document. This is the face we present to the world. This name is what we are, not to be confused with what some people may think we are, although certainly it helps to form the opinion of others. “She has a name for being generous.” Only we know the truth of that name. It is what we are deep down. Are we truly generous, brave, etc, or do we simply show these characteristics to bolster the opinion of others. Think about it. Do you like your name, both of them?

Q_If you wanted to leave a message for someone you have not seen in a long time, who would get your message and what would it say? How could the message be left?

Phyllis_ It has been five years since I heard my husband’s voice, touched his hand, or felt the warmth of his kiss. Five years since I sat beside him, knowing that I could not go with him on that last step on his final journey. Do I have things I want to say, things I never said? No. They are the same things I said during those years of our marriage, but now, they seem different. “I love you,” somehow has a different, deeper meaning. “I’ve missed you,” is different from when it was spoken when one of us had been away for a short time. So many feelings are different, now that the voice is Silent, the touch is gone, the step no longer heard, the passion of youth is no more. I long to tell him so many things one more time with the deeper meaning that is in my heart. There is no conventional communication between us, yet there is that spirit of love that will connect us throughout eternity.

 

Q_ What do you look for in a personal relationship ? Tell us about your friendships.

Phyllis_ It has been said, and for me, it is true. “You may have many acquaintances, but few friends.” Don’t get me wrong, acquaintances are nice. They are the people you meet casually, in the neighborhood, at work or school, at the grocery store. You discuss the weather, your favorite sports team, perhaps a new movie release.

 

A friend is one that you may not have seen for months, and who walks back into your life, occupying the same place as when they left. A friend is there at midnight without asking why you need them. A friend knows without being told what is on your mind, or in your heart. A friend accepts you as you are, even though they don’t always agree with you. Acquaintances are for today, friends are forever.

 

Q_ What thing could you never live without? What would happen if this one thing went away?

Phyllis_ I pushed the play button on the recorder, and the day-room was filled with the notes of “All Glory Be To God On High” for brass and organ. She sat beside me, this woman, who had been the organist at Saint Francis Catholic church in my home town of Staunton, Virginia for over thirty years. I had visited the church on several occasions, and thrilled to her music. Now that talent was gone, and she was spending the rest of her life in what amounted to a state of oblivion. To our amazement her hands and feet began to move in time to the music. I gently placed my hands over hers, and the fingers were moving exactly as they had moved on the keyboard of the pipe organ. She had no idea where she was, perhaps didn’t remember her name, yet the music she loved brought a fragment of the memory of her former life.

 

Memory is so many things from the practical, “I must remember to buy toilet paper,”

to those things of the past, good and bad, funny and sad. In many ways,

memory is our very existence. For me, it is my life.

 

Q_Do you have a handicap – if so, how does that affect your life and what you do? What would you want others to know about you as a writer?

Phyllis_ I have been blind since birth. People frequently ask, “Is it better to have been born blind, or to have lost your sight later in life.” Well,” I reply, “I’d prefer neither.” This usually earns me a laugh, and moves in the direction I’d like to go.

Losing one’s sight and knowing about the loss when it occurs, can be a traumatic experience, and there’s no getting around it, but it isn’t the end of the world. Well, yes, in a way it is, because that person’s life can never be quite the same. For me, and others born blind, or who may become blind in infancy or as a toddler, blindness is the world we know. Of course, we have problems, but I sincerely believe that in many ways they’re easier to at least accept, but, hey, blindness is blindness.

 

I have devoted most of my writing, especially my books to showing the public that we, the blind, are like everybody in the world, and most important, that we are individuals, with individual likes and dislikes, and diverse abilities. I also hope that in reading my books the blind, especially those who have recently lost their sight, may see themselves and their place in their new world, in a more realistic way.

 

Q_Where can readers see your latest book, Where Sheep May Safely Graze, as well as your previous titles?

Phyllis_  http://www.amazon.com/author/psc-books-all

Continue reading

Saturday is for Sharing – Alice Jane-Marie Massa

28 July 2018

Post #112

 

SCAN

Hosted by

Lynda McKinney Lambert & Miss Opal

If you are NEW to SCAN,

Continue reading

Thursday Treasures #5: Reading

July 12, 2018

Post #106

Thursday Treasures #5,  by Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

Note: For today’s Thursday Treasure, I went to my other blog, “Walking by Inner Vision,” Read it here!

I looked into my Archives at Walking by Inner Vision.  I started that blog in December 2009 because I wanted to find a way to communicate with others after my 2-year struggle to be able to use a computer again.

I was trying to recapture my life, after an unexpected  life-altering event.

Today, I’m  publishing an article I first published on February 19, 2010.  I’ve revised that essay  for my readers here at SCAN.

 

Reading: The Stuff of Life

I am reading

 The Power of Myth

by Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers.

This book was on my book shelves for a number of years. It is a larger book that is easily noticeable. I often picked it up and looked through it, waiting for a time when I could sit down and really learn from these two remarkable men.

 

???????????????????????????????

 

During my teaching years at Geneva College,

I often thought about what I would do

 

“When I RETIRE”

 

My profession required extensive reading. I loved to read and

I devoured books and periodicals like there was no tomorrow.

However, the reading I did for my courses was always centered around what I taught in my courses.

I longed for more  time to read outside my course materials and requirements.

I thought ,

Someday I will  be able to do that, when I retire.

I began working  towards that magical future time when I could read to my heart’s content with no goal of ever teaching the material. I wanted to  read  just for me. I would read to satisfy my inner longings. I would read for myself alone. I would read for the sheer joy of reading.

I prepared for my retirement, for years!

My book collection was a treasure  trove of books  gathered  & put on shelves in my home library.

The book treasures  awaited my day of liberation when I could begin reading them. I could spend my retirement days with a precious book in my hands, and have no concern about time or interruptions.  I imagined this new freedom, every day.

I anticipated the time when I no longer had to spend time on the road, traveling to classes, or taking trips for business purposes.

I would not have to organize classes or  take students on international study trips. And, no more endless meetings around a table, talking about strategies, evaluations and future plans for student development.

In my envisioned retirement, I would no longer write conference presentations, faculty reports,  or attend  professional development sessions.

I would merely be reading my accumulation of books from my library shelves. I’d be content.

 

My retirement collection contained books of poetry, art, and great literature  – many of the books are by authors I was not teaching in the classroom.

Some are by my favorite poets, and some are poets I want to read but never had time because of my intense teaching schedule. Of course, I had a collection of hundreds of books from which I created courses. But, my treasured books for retirement were different.

Each book, a treasure, carefully  selected and collected.  

 

What I did not  know was  that a CATASTROPHY  would STOP me COLD!

 Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

  changed my plans. I experienced sudden, permanent, and profound sight loss.

 

All of my  reading is now through technologies either on my computer or on a special machine provided to Blind and Handicapped  people. While I am thankful to be able to read this way, it is certainly not as satisfying as holding a real book in my hands – feeling it’s heft; its unique smell; and the sense of touch from my fingers on the binding or the page edges. And, listening to someone read the book takes away almost all of the quiet and personal imagination that is so much richer.  I will never get used to a professional voice reading a book to me. The voices inside my head, in my imagination, have been abducted by those voices on the machines. I hate it!

 

Despite all of my personal emotions at the drastic changes in how I read, I am still very thankful for  books provided as sound recordings by he National Library of Congress.  I am able to order a variety of books I would like to read, but the books by contemporary poets are quite few. I still love academic books by academics and in the poetry section they simply are not there!  The books from NLS come directly to my house and are sent through the postal service to  my mailbox.

 

Because I love the feel of a physical book, some days, I struggle to read one of my books by using a CCTV (Closed Circuit Television) which is a magnification device. I can only read a very small portion of text at a time, but I am grateful that I still have a small amount of vision so I can actually SEE some text.  I still love the feeling of a real book in my hands, even though my ability to read it as I sit on a comfortable sofa in my library is no longer possible. I’d give anything to snuggle with a quilt on a winter’s day with my book in my hands  and my mind and imagination taking flights of fancy.  There is no replacement for those delights. No machine can do it.

I am thankful for this retirement time  away from the bustle and frenzy that was my professional life up until ELEVEN  long years ago.

However, the loss of eye sight brought new vision to me and I can see some things I would never have known existed if I had not lost most of my sight.  My daily walk is quite different now. But, it is a precious life, nevertheless. I can hear nuances in a voice that tell me exactly what a person is thinking – not what they are saying. I am not distracted by their  expressions now.  I am far more aware of perceptions than I ever was when I had full sight.

As I edit this essay, my two dogs lay nearby and my 2 cats come into my office to sit in the open window each morning. We greet each day together, and it is a good life. My retirement is satisfying and I have even had the time to write books and poetry.  I just completed the work on my 3rd book,  a full-length book of poems,  (Star Signs: New and Selected Poems) and my first chapbook, first snow, is ready for publication, too.

As I write. my 2 dogs  are asleep nearby.  Our 2 cats spend a lot of time in my writing office and like to sit in the open window to survey their world.

Good books and contented dogs & cats bring joy to my life.

READING  is the stuff of MY life.

____________________

 

Thursday Treasures is brought to you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright July 12, 2018. All rights reserved.

SCAN is the sole property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Guest writers may not always reflect the opinions of Lynda Lambert, but this blog is designed to feature authors and artists who have a positive world view.

SCAN is a QUIET PLACE of Inspiration. We love all things ART, NATURE and Literature.

 

Miss Opal

 

Miss Opal and Lynda will

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AUTHORS & ARTISTS on

“Saturday is for Sharing” 

on SCAN

Click Here for SCAN

 

For MORE information on how YOU can be featured on “Saturday is for Sharing,” click on the instructions page at Read it!

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Saturday is for Sharing – Patty L. Fletcher

Welcome

Saturday is for Sharing

  Patty L. Fletcher, Author

 July 7, 2018

SCAN is hosted by

Miss Opal  and Lynda McKinney Lambert.

If you are NEW to SCAN, we recommend: Just SCAN it!

Guest Author

Patty L. Fletcher

Author

Campbell’s Rambles

SmashwordsCover

Patty is the Owner of

Tell-It-To-The-World Marketing.

Email: patty.volunteer1@gmail.com

 

Patty, It is wonderful to have you here today as our First Guest Author.

I first met you on an internet writers group some years ago.  I have watched you create a remarkable career through your publications and your many accomplishments through the blogs you write and manage and the authors you promote. That includes me, and It’s great to work with you.

I’ll begin our interview with this question:

Patty, What is the most important thing you want people to know about you?

 I am kind, caring, and honest.

That is important because, to me,  being kind, caring and honest is a large part of a person’s foundation.  It’s important for others to know these things about me because people need to be assured that those they keep time with are decent people.

It is important to others because the world in which we live today can be a cold cruel place to live sometimes.

People can be unkind but I think people must feel safe, cared about, and loved.

I simply want to project the type of person I want around me.

I treat others how I want to be treated, and make sure they know that whether they’re someone who is important to me or someone I’ve just met they will be treated well.

Q_ How do you decide what really matters in your personal and professional life?

I decide what really matters according to my values.

I think it has a lot to do with how we grow up and what our family values were. Things we are taught as children stay with us for a life-time and learned behaviors are hard to unlearn. I’ve had many in my life who were not so, and the scars will never go away.

Q_Do you have a handicap of some sort? If so, how does it affect your life and what you do?

Yes, I have multiple disabilities. I am totally blind; have Fibromyalgia; suffer from Bipolar Disorder; and Short-Term Memory loss.

Being totally blind affects how I get from place to place, how I dress, cook, clean my home, and even my writing.

As a totally blind person I must rely on others to drive me. If a person who doesn’t drive doesn’t live in an area where there are accessible forms of public transportation they are left to the mercy of friends and family.

No matter how well-meaning folks are when they say, “Call if you need anything” they cannot be expected to drop everything they’re doing every time someone needs to go somewhere.

Sometimes a person just wants to go out for the heck of it. Maybe run out and grab a bottle of wine or a burger.

People aren’t just going to drop what they’re doing to come get me at 2 o’clock on Tuesday afternoon all because I have a craving for a cheese burger, fries and bottle of wine.

Luckily, I live in a town where there is a public transit system and decent taxi services.

Even when I moved into an area where I could not walk easily to a public transit stop, I found our Dial-a-Ride services well run and easy to use.

We have same-day-service, unless the system is extremely booked, should I suddenly decide I want a burger or bottle of wine I can get a ride.

Our taxi service in the area is not bad either. If  I want to go out and about on the weekends when our busses are not running, I can still go out.

 

Fibromyalgia is a horse of a different color.

Sometimes Fibromyalgia  causes so much pain and discomfort I have trouble doing the simplest of tasks.

There are mornings when I can barely get out of bed to take my guide dog out for his first walk of the day.

I find that having the dog does lots more for me than providing safe travels to and from all the places I want to go.

Campbell keeps me going and helps me push through days that I might simply choose to give up and stay in bed all day.

Having to get up and be active whether I feel like it or not most times makes it easier to deal with the pain I sometimes experience.

Bipolar is the worst disability I deal with.

Being an emotional person can be a problem all by itself.

Being a person who suffers from wildly swinging moods, and at times what is considered to others strange behaviors can really cause problems in my every-day life.

It causes problems in relationships with family and friends. It causes problems with dating and it for sure has caused me to lose people in my life.

 

Short-term memory loss is just,well, a pain in the tail.

Imagine not being able to remember where you sat something down. Then compound that problem with being blind and not being able to sweep your gaze around the room and see where it is sitting.

 

That, friends is problematic in the worst kind of way.

When I was working in the public sector and needed to be at work on time I had to be absolutely certain of where everything was the night before and sometimes even take notes about it so that in the morning’s rush to get ready and leave for work I did not waste time hunting here and there.

People advise putting things in the same place all the time.

That does not necessarily work because if the memory loss kicks in that place where ever it was, is forgotten.

 

Q_How can a person overcome a handicap and what would you want that person to know?  

 

Overcoming handicaps like mine takes arduous work,

perseverance and patience.

I don’t mind the challenging work, and persevering is something I’m getting better and better at but I’m still running very short on patience.

As far as how my handicaps affect my writing, well as I say I am totally blind. I use a screen reader or voice over technology on my computer. The sighted world forgets about blind persons a lot of the time so lots of times things do not work for me as they do for the sighted computer user.

Examples are:  screenshots, memes and info graphics are not readable for screen reader users.

The world is full of them and no matter how many times I remind people of that fact, many do not take those things into consideration when they put their works out for the world to “See.”

 

This is a topic I am quite passionate about these days.

In fact, just today, I’ve been involved in a Facebook conversation about this issue.

A friend was really in a tizzy over an update that changed the fact that when the background colors are changed on a post, a  person using a screen reader or voice over can no longer read it.

The comments on their posts ranged from mild annoyance to downright rude angry and childish.

So, I got onto my own timeline and wrote how I understood that it is annoying when sites like Facebook update and our needs are left out of the mix. I, too, lose my cool at times and rant on it but if we have educated conversations with people about it we would find that people would listen to our side of the situation. Many times things would get resolved.

A friend of mine commented that the old saying was true and that we would most assuredly get more flies with honey.

I wrote back the following.

I love this way of looking at it.

I hated to be in such a snit about this, but it just gets so old reading people’s puling on and on about how the sighted world just gives us no thought at all.

It’s simply not the way of it.

 

It’s no different from the fact that I don’t have a clue what it takes to drive a car. I have no idea how tiring it might get driving from place to place, how much strength it might take, how uncomfortable it might be for someone who has a back issue whatever.

 

My point is:

People simply cannot know what they don’t know, and they don’t put into the forefront of their minds something that they do not deal with all the time.

 

Just a little while ago I clicked onto a page of someone who had shared a post. I like the stuff they write and say or share from others so of course I wanted to see what they had to share. Well, when I got there it was a darn photo and all I got to read was, “Photo may contain text “Well it disappointed me. I really wanted to know what it said. So rather than go into a rage rant snit about it I wrote.

“Shame it’s one of those pesky pictures

that only says to me photo may contain text”

Then the poster and I had a chat about it.

People today want everything right now. The youth of today knows nothing of what it was for blind people even ten and twenty years ago. They’re covered up in technology that makes their lives easier than those who grew up in even the 80 and 90’s knew. And we’re not going any further back than that because they could not possibly comprehend it. I get so annoyed when I read someone griping about a book that has not yet made it to Bard.  (Bard is the National Library Services For the Blind and Physically Handicap)

See: That All My Read

First, I want to know why they cannot spend $4 and buy an eBook that is one-hundred percent accessible with voice over and Amazon even has a free Kindle app for their computer, so they can read it.

Second, I want to ask them how they’d have liked it if they’d had to sit around and wait on the mail to bring cassette tapes or records that might or might not play when they arrived. (I’m dating myself here, but the youth of today is soft spoiled and plane out nerve-racking.)

 

Not long ago I wrote a blog post called “Challenges of a Disabled Writer”

POST URL:  https://campbellsworld.wordpress.com/2018/02/07/challenges-of-a-disabled-writer/

 

I felt it was time to start raising awareness on a higher level. Sometime later in a different post the subject came back up yet again so I re-shared the post link into that conversation’s comment section.

 

I spent the remainder of that day having a ton of magnificent conversations with a whole bunch of bloggers on the subject and by the end of that day, more people had an idea of what they could do to make things easier on those of us who do not see.

Blindness does not define who I am. None of my handicaps do.

They are a part of me, I must live in this world and like it or not,  persons who are disabled are the minority.

 

I obviously cannot walk around angry about it all the time so, to me,  the best thing to do is to talk about it in a polite rational informative manner.

We, all of us, have issues that we deal with. If people really stopped and thought about it everyone in the whole wide world is handicapped in some way.

I have a saying…

“There is no right way. There is no wrong way. There just is, a way.”

 

Q_Patty, can you talk a little bit about how and where you do your writing?

Do you write in solitude or in public places?

I mostly like quiet solitude when I write.

There are times when I toss my Laptop in a backpack, grab a set of headphones, my phone and Bluetooth keyboard and all other necessary writing tools and head off to a favorite bar or coffee-house.

I usually do this when I find myself running low on inspiration.

Sometimes I don’t really need to engage with others. I just need to be able to listen to conversations and activities going on around me while I write.

It seems to help my writers’ block when I change my environment.

When I wrote my first book,

Campbell’s Rambles:

How a Seeing Eye Dog Retrieved My Life,

I wrote a sizable portion of this first book sitting in the phone room where I worked.

We would get quiet time sometimes on the phones and I had to have something to do to fill that time.

I found I could write my book there because people I worked with loved hearing the stories of things that happened during my time at The Seeing Eye so while I told stories I wrote them down.

Final Comment from Lynda and Miss Opal:

Patty, Miss Opal and I agree that your interview and story is encouraging to us.  We appreciate your honesty and courage and how you described  your daily battles & victories as a person with multiple disabilities. 

We know our readers will be inspired and encouraged by your courageous journey and we thank you for being our first guest at “Saturday is for Sharing.”

Q_Patty, please give us a final thought about your book,

 In this magical and love filled tail, King Campbell (AKA Bubba) travels to the puppy nursery at The Seeing Eye to help ready a group of puppies who are just about to embark on the fabulous journey of learning to become Seeing Eye dogs. Just as he is about to finish his tail, a wee pup becomes very frightened of all that lies ahead, and one frightfully stormy night she runs away! Will King Campbell hear the urgent call from the puppy nursery in time? Will they find her and save her so she can fulfill her destiny?

The use of “Tail ” instead of “Tale”  –  and – “Magik” instead of “Magic” is intended for these short stories. A great play on words from King Campbell

Buy Link

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0765BWDJF

The use of “Tail”  instead of “Tale”  for story and “Magik” instead of “Magic” is intended for these short stories. A great play on words from King Campbell

 

Patty’s final comment:

I’m very grateful for having had this time to share a

bit of myself with you and your readers.

 

18_SCAN_PattyFletcher_BubbaTalk

____________________

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright July 7, 2018. All rights reserved.

Saturday is for Sharing

A weekly series coordinated by Lynda and Miss Opal, her feline writing partner.  Lynda and Miss Opal live in rural western Pennsylvania in The Village of Wurtemburg. Miss Opal has a sister-cat named Miss Bessie.  Lynda is married to Bob Lambert and the couple share their home with 2 rescued dogs;  Mitchell and Miss Dixie Tulip. Lynda is a retired professor of fine arts and humanities, and she is a fiber artist and author.

Lynda is the author of 2 published books:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage Buy it!

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems Buy it!

 

Lynda has just completed her 3rd book

Star Signs: New & Selected Poems – 60 poems

AND her FIRST CHAPBOOK

first snow, 16 Poems with a Wintry Theme.

Both new books  are now available for publication. Editors, please contact Lynda for the manuscript.

 

~Thank you for visiting with us today~

Miss Opal and Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

Contact:  Lynda & Miss Opal at:  riverwoman@zoominternet.net

Your COMMENTS, QUESTIONS, and SUGGESTIONS are always welcome.

PLEASE SHARE by Re-Blogging this article on Social Media.

 

 

 

Saturday is for Sharing – Musings on Saturday Morning

 

Saturday is for Sharing

 Saturday Musings ~

on the LAST DAY OF JUNE, 2018

Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

 

An essay by Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

Walk dogs – Check!

Morning Coffee – Check!

Open window for Miss Opal – Check!

Read E-mail – Check!

 

Miss Opal is my feline writing companion.

She is seated on top of my file cabinet, watching intently out the open window as she does each morning.  Like all cats, she is intrigued by the bird sounds and life passing by on this rural western Pennsylvania road. We begin our days before dawn. We rise with the crows and the red-tailed hawks that soar over the landscape outside our window. 

 

Next Saturday, I will present my first Guest Author on “Saturday is for Sharing.”

That is exciting because I have some stellar authors lined up for this new adventure.  You will love meeting my guests!

 

I am so interested in the responses to the questions I ask my guests.

Reading them and working on the articles caused me to do some musing on my own thoughts about what I do as a visual  artist and a writer/author. I work across disciplines in everything I do.

 

First, I considered my own challenge –

I am a blind person.

 

Unlike some other artists and writers who are challenged with a handicap or disability, I have never written much about the sudden sight loss that I experienced eleven years ago.

 

I was at the height of a wonderful career and my personal life was fantastic the year I turned sixty-four.

 

I worked out at the gym 6-7 days a week. My body was so healthy and I felt so good in my skin. Hi energy! Excited about life! Living my passions! High Achiever!

 

Other pleasures-

  • My teaching schedule at Geneva College (Beaver Falls, PA)). It was a career that I loved. My courses included lecturing and teaching in the Humanities, Fine Art Studio classes, and special courses in English literature.

  • My studies and teaching extended to include a month-long course I taught while living in Europe every summer. I wrote and drew in my sketchbook every day as I traveled.

  • My first book, Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage developed from my sketchbook jottings and drawings. Life was a grand adventure.

  • In my artist’s life, I was having exhibitions all over the world and had done so since 1976. Literature and art are my passions.  I was so blessed to be living my dream.

 

In a day, that all ended.  While I say it ended, what really happened is that it all changed dramatically when I lost my vision due to Ischemic Optic Neuropathy.  How does a person pick up the pieces and move on, when it seems that you have lost everything you have in your life?  The answer is one that comes slowly – over time. The answer unravels, day by day, year after year.  It has now been eleven years since my own personal disaster stopped me cold.

 

When I thought I was finished

and my life was over – 

I was mistaken!

 

I’ve moved on in my art making to new places where I might never have gone without the sight loss. However, I realize now that my mind was going into uncharted territory before the sight loss.

 

In my writing life, I have written about sight loss by creating some essays about individual works of art that I created after I began to recover. I had intense rehabilitation training – but it took a few years for me to be able to do art work again.

 

I realized that I do not want to be represented by blindness. It was not my choice and I will never embrace it. I will never “get over it.”

I seldom say that I am blind because I don’t want to be viewed through that lens.

But there! I have spoken about what I think of this disability.

I am blind.

  • Yet, I write books.
  • Yet, I make fine art.
  • Yet, I walk by INNER VISION, not SIGHT
  • Yet,  my art is in international exhibitions.
  • Yet, I win awards for my art and writing.
  • Yet, my  life is active and wholesome.

Yet, I have a voice and I will use that voice to speak through literature and art.

All’s well.

Though I walk in cloudy mists and shadow…

 

Yet, I walk!

 

 

Today, as I read the comments that one of my physically challenged guests wrote to me, I began to think more about my own visual challenges.

 

I know some visitors to my blog will read this story and will be inspired and encouraged, to face their own life situations no matter what they are.  I want you to know we all give a voice to what we all deal with every day.

 

Some of us offer hope & insight with our words.

Some of us speak to the world through our works of art.

Some of us write extensively and create works of art also.

However, we choose to do it, we put a voice to our thoughts in our creative works.

 

If you were to scratch down through the surface of me, you will find that  I am an artist at the core, and my writing evolves from art – and art-related ideas. My writing is created as I would create a work of art – in many layers.  These days, in my writing studio, I am layering words and images as I paint the pictures that come through in poetry and non-fiction essays.

 

You are not a disability.

You are not a handicap.

You are courage personified.

The world needs to hear what you have to say.

 

____________________

“Saturday is for Sharing is created by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright June 30, 2018. All Rights Reserved.

 

PLEASE pass this message along to you friends today.

Please comment at the end of this message. Please re-blog.

Thank you for visiting with me today. Happy Final Saturday of June, 2018.

All;s Well!

Visit me:  www.lyndalambert.com

 

Read more stories by Lynda Lambert at:

http://www.llambert363.blog

 

Author:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage: Poems, Kota Press, 2003

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017

first snow : Chapbook. Manuscript completed and ready to send to editors for publication.

Star Signs: New & Selected Poems.  Manuscript completed and ready to send to editors for publication.

Editors: contact me for information & viewing.

My Author’s Page:  http://www.dldbooks.com/lyndalambert

 

 

Dialogue in the Dark

Are you afraid of the dark?

I have to admit it.  I am!

OK, the weird thing about  my confession is

I am a blind person.

Maribel Steel, a low vision writer for Vision Aware Blog (on the American Foundation for the Blind website)  joins the CEO of Guide Dogs Victoria shared this great audio interview about Dialogue in the Dark experiences.

Peek Inside Dialogue in the Dark

on ABC Radio National.

I have to say, it is memorable and this conversation gives us insight into the experience a sighted person has when they find themselves completely “in the dark” with a blind or low vision guide.

I would love to be able to have this experience.

http://maribelsteel.com/category/audio-stories/

 

Goals or Intentions?

Goals or Intentions?

What’s the DIFFERENCE?

Goals are NOT Intentions. 

Intentions are NOT Goals!

by Lynda McKinney Lambert

What’s the BIG DEAL?   Well, it is a very big deal and can make all the difference in the world as to How you ENVISION  your life: what you DO;  Who you ARE;  What you will BE,

I will be important to know the differences between two words that many people misunderstand. 

The two words are not  interchangeable.

Knowing the difference can make a remarkable change in your life this year.

 

Photo_Chopra_Intention

What is a TRIGGER for Transformation?

 

I would like to explore this idea with you today!

 

 

 

 

 

Knitting15_Scarf9_4

Lynda  McKinney Lambert 

I feel like a star  and I love to sparkle.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by Bob Lambert, 2015

Lynda’s Bio

Lynda McKinney Lambert – author of “Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage” published by  Kota Press. To order, click here:  Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage
Lynda  authors two blogs on writing, the humanities, arts, and faith.
She is a freelance writer and her poetry and essays appear in numerous books and literary journals.  She is a retired professor of fine arts and humanities and she exhibits her fiber arts in exhibitions worldwide.
Currently, Lynda  has two books in development for publication in late 2016.

If you would like a signed copy of my book, contact me for information.