Categories
Christianity Gifts of the Spirit Music Voice Recording

Gifts of the Spirit – HOPE

ost #245

October 17, 2020

 

Lynda McKinney Lambert

Presents

Gifts of the Spirit

Hope

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of a gift wrapped in blue paper with a blue satin ribbon.
Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

 

 

 

 

Supporters and Friends

Your  encouraging messages give me the GIFT of HOPE.

I’ve become familiar with the way God whispers gently to us to give us His divine guidance and ideas for the direction he wants us to go?

I feel this tender nudge from God that at times. It is usually about

something that is common sense. I often think, “Why didn’t I think of this?

Yes, it makes sense, and it’s an

excellent idea.”

 

Gifts of the Spirit is the new full-length book I started writing this year.

I plan to complete the manuscript draft by the end of December 2021.

 

About this blog –

Gifts of the Spirit.

I’ll share some new poems, reflections, thoughtful, personal essays, and non-fiction stories on this blog for the next fourteen months. You might be reading the drafts of those writings that will finally become a collection in the book, Gifts of the Spirit: Poems & Stories.

I received a personal note from my friend Lynda J.

It arrived in a moment when  I was thinking about writing this post. She references the Dallas Holm song, “I Have Hope.”  God sends us such gentle reminders from unexpected sources at the precise time we need them. God is always right on time.

 

During 2020, a year of pandemic fears and anxieties, I can truly say, “I have hope.”

Here is what my colleague and friend sent to me today:

 

Lynda,

what a powerful testimony the Lord has led you to share.

I couldn’t agree with you more if I’d written a statement myself!!

 

One of your sentences reminded me of the chorus of one of my favorite Dallas Holm songs:

 

I have joy in the time of sorrow,

I have peace in the raging storm.

I have faith that Jesus holds tomorrow,

I have hope, I’m resting in His arms.

*

At the beginning of 2020, I chose One Word for my entire year – GIFTS.

I started choosing One Word for my year in 2015.

I wanted to think more seriously about giving GIFTS and receiving GIFTS. Because I am a Christian, I decided to do everything this year as a Gift for my King, Jesus! In my writing, artmaking, and everyday life at home, I kept this in mind.

This entire year is a journey of surprises for all of us, isn’t it?

 

Of course, I had no idea how that Word would reveal new meaning as the months come and go.

 

None of us could have anticipated the arrival of a pandemic and how we would experience life this year. We still have no idea what to expect, but we live in the eternal hope – our lives are in God’s hands, and he will take care of us no matter what the circumstances may be at any time.

 

Looking at history, we know that events such as this pandemic are not exceptional. People of all ages have faced tremendous changes and fears that come with those unexpected events. I know that for Christians, we are never alone in any circumstances that we face. Our faith is built on the solid foundation of our Lord, Jesus Christ.

I placed my life in His capable hands, and I find peace in times of storms or painful circumstances, and I find joy in times of sunshine and prosperity.

We have the gifts that the Father gives us in all seasons and in all cases. In fact, here is just one example of what God’s intentions are for His beloved children.

 

Jeremiah 29:11 (NIV)

For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”

 

During the first week of October, I received some beautiful gifts, and I am sharing the news with you in this message.

 

I am delighted that Marcia Meara, author of the blog _The Write Stuff_ published a Special Feature about my writing and award-winning fiber art.

Read it here.

https://marciamearawrites.com/2020/10/07/lynda-lambert/comment-page-1/#comment-42259

 

I enjoy seeing the visitors who read the article and leave comments.

Hint: I’d love to see your thoughts, and I will reply to any comments you leave. Go ahead, make my day! Visit the link and leave a comment.

 

Second, I won a First Place Award for my talisman, “My Eyes are Only  for You,” at the InSights20 exhibition in Louisville, KY. The show opened on October 7, and you are invited to attend the virtual opening, which is available now.

Note: This year, first place is a shared award – which is lovely for the other artist and me.

 

The video is live now. You can see a photo of the artwork, the artist who made it, and a description. Rob Guillen is the coordinator of this annual exhibition. He will lead you through the winning pieces via the video. This juried art exhibition is presented by the American Printing House for the Blind. All artists in the show have a visual impairment. I am deeply honored to be a part of this project – my fifth time to have my work accepted in the Crafts Division by the jury – and my fifth award.

 

Here is the link to see the winners of the Craft Division – See it here!

https://insights-art.org/the-exhibit/craft/

 

 

Third, my poem, “The Talisman,” inspired by the process of making the talisman in the APH InSights 20 show, is in the October Issue of Newsreel.

If you subscribe to this audio magazine, you will hear me reading the poem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by American Printing House for the Blind – InSights20 exhibition.  This is a talisman, “My Eyes are Only for You.”  by Lynda McKinney Lambert.  This piece won first place in the crafts division – it shared first place with another art work.

*

“A Talisman”

by Lynda McKinney Lambert

Visualize a talisman-

precious stones and crystals

woven in bold patterns

plenty of Japanese glass seed beads

tiny drops of perfect symmetry.

I select flawless beads

stab them onto steel needles

hundreds of stitches.

thrust them one at a time

upwards into the heavens

endlessly.

I plunge my thin needle

deep through layers of stiff cloth

make my stitches sure

hold tight.

I’m a warrior woman

thumping my spirit-drum

made of dappled starlight.

I measure timeless days

counting beads in

a mystical circle

held together

with a bronze toggle clasp.

A Talisman brings

protection from evil

healing for weary spirits

nourishment for aching bodies

courage for new directions

on a pilgrimage

over treacherous pathways

guides my dimmed eyes

and nervous steps.

Black onyx ovals

are like a vintage fan

unfurled with a flourish

or a sacred victory flag

prepared to cast an invocation.

My fingers stroke cold stones

glossy-smooth, polished, faceted.

Gifts for a King.

______

Copyright, August2 2020

Lynda McKinney Lambert,

All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

HOPE 

 

 

 

 

Categories
Nature Seasons

April’s Benefits

 April’s Benefits Arrived

with the Spring Showers

Post #78 on this blog!

 

 

Today: I stand on the edge of the END of APRIL

I begin thinking of the CHANGES this time in the cycle of life can give us. I wrote a blog post  on SCAN in April 2015. I looked back at that post from 3 years ago and edited it.

 April whispers,  “Move on!”

 

Bright spring flowers flourish all around us by mid-April.

I bought a little pot of yellow tulips recently. They brightened our dining room table and made me feel happy every time I glanced at them. I am not a gardener so I enjoy buying potted plants and floral bouquets throughout the year with the changing seasons. April’s flowers sparkle with brilliance in dazzling yellow daffodils, tulips in a range from vivid red and coral, to soft pink and white. By the end of April, Pennsylvania’s grassy meadows will be covered with blankets of  purple-blue violets.

 

Our walk home from grade school took a bit longer when I was a little girl.

Our rural home was nearly a mile from the school and  we walked along a meandering path morning and afternoon. By mid-April we found the delightful blooming violets in the fields.The small, fragrant blooms beckoned my sister and me to come closer!

 

We forgot that we were supposed to walk directly home after school

on those long-ago spring days as we stooped down low, extended our eager hands, and began picking violets to take back home with us. The hot afternoon sun beat down on us as we gathered a fist full of the fragile delights. Once home with our treasured flowers, we put them in  little glass jelly jars. Our bouquets remained in a special space on our kitchen windowsill. To this day, many decades later, I still remember the joy of small wildflowers in the house

April signaled that it is now the beginnings of new life surging in Nature. 

On mornings like this one, I take leisurely walks with the dogs. I became conscious of the subtle changes today. After a long lasting winter this year, each new spring day seems especially precious as it brings warmth, sunshine, budding bushes and trees.

We forget we have several senses  that give  us information.

We dwell primarily on the visual stimulation and distractions.  I am legally blind and the entire world is a diffusion of shadowy forms that are distorted, foggy impressions. The positive aspect of sight loss is that I am more aware of  a variety of nuances I missed out on when I was fully sighted. I was too focused on looking and learning only through my eyes.

 

On my morning walk,  I listened carefully

to low sounds of an owl singing its final notes as the sunshine brought strong light to this new day. I thought about the owl and imagined it must be celebrating the end of a fruitful night of hunting for food.  It sounded content.

While the owl can settle down and relax to have a nice sleep for the day, I am just beginning my day. I breathe deeply and felt the coldness on my face and hands. My face tingled with the cold breeze and my hands reminded me they are exposed and I have not brought along a pair of gloves to warm them up on this hour-long walk.

But, I am not so concerned with the coolness of the morning today.

Instead, my thoughts move on to the meaning of spring and how each day is bringing changes to the world around me. The cold air  is just right for this new day. I reach down occasionally to tell my dog, “Good Girl! Heel. Good Heel. Good Girl!.” She glances up at me, and quickly looks back at the path before her and sniffs the air. When we come to a wooded place, near an abandoned mill, I relax her leash and allow her to enjoy tramping in the winter packed leaves that lay all around the trees. She digs down into them  and pushes the soggy leaves aside. She seeks direct passage to the scent that caught her attention. Eventually, I pull her back to heel position and we continue on for the second half of our morning travels. We turn the bend to head back towards home together.

***

I know that we often think of January as a time of new beginnings.

After all, it marks the New Year. Perhaps we might rethink this idea when we find ourselves walking in the early morning in April, with the warming of spring sunshine on our bodies. April truly is the time of new beginnings. April whispers to us,  “move on!”

April affirms life and growth

We can DISCOVER, RECOVER, and REVISE our life.

__________

This essay is brought to you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems being published.

Lynda’s  Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

this blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright April 29, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Visit me:  www.lyndalambert.com

Author:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage: Poems, Kota Press, 2003

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017

First Snow : Chapbook, is ready for publication.

Editors: contact me for information & viewing.

 

 

Categories
art Christianity

My Life as a Pivot

My Life as a Pivot

 

I am pivoted from one location, to another. I turn, and move suddenly to a new route. I change. 

May is the month of graduation ceremonies.  Nearly 3 decades ago, I walked down the aisle in my cap and gown to receive my third, and final, degree.  The formal procession marked the end of 9 years of diligent work in which I earned 3 university degrees at 2 different universities, in 2 different states.  Of course, I was happy to reach the lofty educational goals I set.  But, even so, I had a strange sense of loss because I was leaving the environment of being a student in the myriad of classrooms over those years. I loved being a student. When that final diploma was in my hand, I knew I stood at a fork in the road. This achievement meant that I had reached dividing point between my student-centered life of studies and my new academic life as a professional educator.

 

When students begin to pursue the academic goals that lead to a college degree, they decide to embrace a future-centered environment that will involve them in life-long learning.

I eventually understood that even as a first semester freshmen, a university student is already a professional. It is the decision to begin this journey that propels a student into a professional. It is the decision that marks the change and not the receipt of the final degree.  The final graduation ceremony was the turning point for me because it signified a momentous modification in direction. I mourned the loss of being in a classroom, as a student, for many years. Honestly, I wanted to be a student forever.

On reflection of those years, I can say I wrote more research papers than I can remember. Writing and researching various topics in my fields of fine arts and humanities motivated me and urged me onward in pursuit of wisdom.

I thrived on doing research at the library; searching through the pages of various periodicals or books was a passion.

In the process of writing papers, I discovered new research.  I felt like an archaeologist digging in a multi-layered excavation site. Every page I turned just might lead to a new discovery.  New discoveries revealed a new set of questions and new paths to pursue.

We often find hidden pathways and ancient passages in the debris and dust we gather as we write our papers. There is always something that compels us to explore.  Dig deeper. In the course of researching and writing papers, I experienced the unexpected or unknown.  It is in these pivots of our life that we encounter our true self as we continually ask:

“What if?”  “Now what?” “Where will this lead me?”  “What is this world view?”

Miriam Webster’s Dictionary reveals that a pivot can be a noun or a verb. Yes, I can see it both ways but when I think of this word, pivot, I feel like an action is taking place. This word indicates a movement, to me. Research brings me to new information. New conclusions.

 

__________

Visit the  WELCOME PAGE to learn more about Lynda McKinney Lambert. activities and career.

Lynda McKinney Lambert lives and writes in the Village of Wurtemburg, in Western Pennsylvania.  Her articles and poems appear on a number of blogs, as well as Literary Magazines and books.

View Publications Page for her most recent updates.

Discover Lynda’s other blog, Walking by Inner Vision.

 

Check out Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

Copyright 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

“Thanks for rejoicing with me today.  Isn’t God so wonderful!”

Romans 8:28