___ONE WORD___


For the 4th year, I selected ONE WORD

to guide my intentions.



Why did I choose ABIDE?  

Abide is a VERB. 

verb (used without object), abode or abided, abiding


to remain; continue; stay; stand



to have one’s abode; dwell; reside



to continue in a particular direction, condition, attitude, relationship, path; last.



I discovered  that my ONE WORD seems to FIND ME. That particular word


seemed to hover around for a while in my everyday life. The thought of it  kept on coming into my awareness for the past few weeks.  I seemed to KNOW it is the right word for my year.




Did you know?

We have God-given INTUITION.

Our personal intuition GUIDES US much better than a GPS.

We have accurate and specific DIRECTION for our life. Pay attention to it.

We all have INTUITION  –  a still, small voice inside of us.

Listen for it.


Have YOU thought about choosing ONE WORD that will guide you in the direction you intend to go this year?


What comes to your mind right now?

Grab ONE WORD and make it YOURS!





Lynda McKinney Lambert is a Western Pennsylvania author and visual artist.

View Publications Page for updates.

Lynda’s  Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

this blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright December 30, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.


“Thanks for rejoicing with me today.  Isn’t God so wonderful!”

Romans 8:28

Prepare for the Muse

Poetry is Always a Good Idea*

*Quote from  Proofs and Theories: Essays on Poetry by Louise Gluck.



Once I begin a poem, it absorbs me completely. I stay with it hour after hour; sometimes rewriting it long after I thought it was finished. The poem, it seems to me, sometimes takes some years of growing; I am able to come back to those first attempts and have an understanding of what the poem was to become. The poem ages, evolves, and goes through shifts over a long period of time, just like I do in my everyday life. Understanding our own work takes a very long time.


Early Writings


I began to write poetry as an undergraduate BFA student at Slippery Rock University of PA in the mid-80s. My first poetry publications appeared in Ginger Hill Literary Journal,   published by the English Department. I was a fine arts major in painting, but English literature was a passion, too. I took so many English courses that it qualified me for entrance into the grad program after I received my BFA.  I was in love with words and images!

In graduate school at West Virginia University, While I worked on my MFA in Painting, I continued writing  poetry and I was reading a lot of poetry and saw that  poetry is an art form. My perspective is quite different because of my Fine Arts background. My poems appeared in The Daily Athenian in Morgantown, WV.  Modern and post-modernist poetry was influencing my life every day. My painting and printmaking was growing from the ideas I was reading in poetry. contemporary poetry was my lighthouse, and the more I was swimming towards it, the more I realized it was moving away as I wrote – I had to work hard to try to get to it, to capture  images and words on the pages and the canvases.  I had begun learning how to capture the senses in my work with words.

I did the unthinkable – I chose to accept BOTH of the offers in English and in Fine Arts programs. I actually did BOTH  Graduate Programs at the same time. My higher education would  be a hybrid of the pursuit of poetry and studio work!

While  pursuing the MFA (the Terminal Degree in Fine Arts studio work) in painting, I started working on a MA in English at Slippery Rock University  of PA – doing graduate work in 2 different disciplines at 2 different universities and in 2 different states –  simultaneously.

The state slogan for WV is “Almost Heaven.”

But I  was actually IN  Heaven.

I am a Ranaissance woman who would continue to embrace the Humanities, follow my passions in Fine Arts and Literature. I knew I would never dig a deep hole down into only one genre, but I would pursue a hybrid path that was my own creation. I was truly a Post -Modern disciple!

Prepare for the Muse


As I write this essay,  nearly 3 decades later,  

I am still working to get the words right.

I struggle to evoke the senses that describe

what I portray in the poem.

My Process:  GREAT IDEAS

  1. Make a Writing Space for yourself. Mine is in a room that steps down off of my kitchen. It is a room dedicated to be my Writing Space. I like to work with the radio on most of the time. The radio is in my kitchen so I can have music but not so close as to be a distraction.
  2. Organize your Writing Space. This area is your personal private place to do your work. Make sure it is not an area shared by anyone else. Be firm and declare this room or space to be only for you. Don’t give in to any demands for anyone else to use it in any way.  Organize it to suit your intentions and needs.
  3. No Cluttering Permitted in your Writing Space. You need a peaceful space and any cluttering will be a distraction to you. Clean your space and organize it and make sure it stays this way. I believe a cluttered mind is reflected by aa messy and disorganized Writing Space.
  4. Ask yourself, “How does my life want to be lived?” I like to check with my “inner feelings” to be sure I am doing what my spirit really wants to do. With so many voices in our ears, we need to stop often to have a check on our “inner feeling
  5. I walk my dogs in the woods every day. Often, I hear a flock of crows overhead.  Our thoughts can be like those crow sounds: loud and demanding. If we follow all those thoughts, our day can turn into a hot mess and nothing gets done. So stop and realize we need quietness and a “check in” with those quiet and still leadings that we have – our intuition.


“Set your pen to paper and live for poetry!  Dwell in its wondrous city, whole and

full-hearted.”  Sheila Bender


Find 1 or 2  writers you like a lot.

Read their work and write about what you like about that work in  your journal.

Begin to search out their work so you can find common themes and quotes that have influenced you. Your chosen writers will become YOUR MENTORS.


A number of years ago, this was my list:

Robert Bly

William Carlos Williams

John Donne

Ranier Maria Rilke

(Today, I’ve added others on my list – b t this post is about our beginnings. We can talk about my literary mentors another day.)


Article and Photography by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright, June10, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Lynda  McKinney Lambert

.Front Cover



Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage (Kota Press), 2002.


Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017 

Book is $14.95  and if you want it signed contact the me. Postage is $3.00.

Lynda is a Peer Adviser  and writes articles on sight loss and blindness for  Vision Aware Blog

CONTACT ME: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 Author – Blogger – Visual Artist

Checking up on….. Me?


on yourself recently?

While I was looking for information on an art exhibit, I decided to type in my name on the google search engine. Yes, indeed,  I found MYSELF!


It’s always a good idea to put your BEST work on your blogs and  pages. Now that I see what is there that I wrote, I am satisfied that the 17 pages are positive ones. It’s good to know how your postings come back to haunt you sometimes. Make sure you put your best thought out there for the world to view. You know what “they say” – you only have one chance to make a good impression.

My 17 best posts.


Photo above appeared in the Ellwood City Ledger web site, Saturday July 29, 2017.


Dialogue in the Dark

Are you afraid of the dark?

I have to admit it.  I am!

OK, the weird thing about  my confession is

I am a blind person.

Maribel Steel, a low vision writer for Vision Aware Blog (on the American Foundation for the Blind website)  joins the CEO of Guide Dogs Victoria shared this great audio interview about Dialogue in the Dark experiences.

Peek Inside Dialogue in the Dark

on ABC Radio National.

I have to say, it is memorable and this conversation gives us insight into the experience a sighted person has when they find themselves completely “in the dark” with a blind or low vision guide.

I would love to be able to have this experience.




Stewardship – Take a Time Out


The inner life of a Christian  has to be different.

We don’t walk to the same drummer as many other people.  We need to recognize this and HONOR it.

A  gift  was given to us by our Creator. And, with every gift we are given we see a glimmer of how another person sees us.  With the  gifts we receive, we have insight into who we are. Each gift brings with it a responsibility to be recognized and honored.

Guard your time for it is precious. Set time apart to be alone in solitude. For in being alone and set apart, we can listen to the voice of God and know our purpose.

Busy-ness is not to be desired.

“Crazy Busy” is just that – CRAZY!

“BUSY” is not a virtue.

When is the last time you were still and quiet?  Perhaps you need to be a good steward of your time? Take some “time out” to allow the Holy Spirit to communicate with you and guide your day.

“Be still, and know that I am God; I will be exalted among the nations, I will be exalted in the earth.”  Ps

Psalm 46:1

Article and Photography by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright, June10, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Lynda  McKinney Lambert

.Front Cover



Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage (Kota Press), 2002.


Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017 

Lynda is a Peer Adviser  and writes articles on sight loss and blindness for  Vision Aware Blog

CONTACT ME: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 Author – Blogger – Visual Artist

My Life as a Pivot

My Life as a Pivot


I am pivoted from one location, to another. I turn, and move suddenly to a new route. I change. 

May is the month of graduation ceremonies.  Nearly 3 decades ago, I walked down the aisle in my cap and gown to receive my third, and final, degree.  The formal procession marked the end of 9 years of diligent work in which I earned 3 university degrees at 2 different universities, in 2 different states.  Of course, I was happy to reach the lofty educational goals I set.  But, even so, I had a strange sense of loss because I was leaving the environment of being a student in the myriad of classrooms over those years. I loved being a student. When that final diploma was in my hand, I knew I stood at a fork in the road. This achievement meant that I had reached dividing point between my student-centered life of studies and my new academic life as a professional educator.


When students begin to pursue the academic goals that lead to a college degree, they decide to embrace a future-centered environment that will involve them in life-long learning.

I eventually understood that even as a first semester freshmen, a university student is already a professional. It is the decision to begin this journey that propels a student into a professional. It is the decision that marks the change and not the receipt of the final degree.  The final graduation ceremony was the turning point for me because it signified a momentous modification in direction. I mourned the loss of being in a classroom, as a student, for many years. Honestly, I wanted to be a student forever.

On reflection of those years, I can say I wrote more research papers than I can remember. Writing and researching various topics in my fields of fine arts and humanities motivated me and urged me onward in pursuit of wisdom.

I thrived on doing research at the library; searching through the pages of various periodicals or books was a passion.

In the process of writing papers, I discovered new research.  I felt like an archaeologist digging in a multi-layered excavation site. Every page I turned just might lead to a new discovery.  New discoveries revealed a new set of questions and new paths to pursue.

We often find hidden pathways and ancient passages in the debris and dust we gather as we write our papers. There is always something that compels us to explore.  Dig deeper. In the course of researching and writing papers, I experienced the unexpected or unknown.  It is in these pivots of our life that we encounter our true self as we continually ask:

“What if?”  “Now what?” “Where will this lead me?”  “What is this world view?”

Miriam Webster’s Dictionary reveals that a pivot can be a noun or a verb. Yes, I can see it both ways but when I think of this word, pivot, I feel like an action is taking place. This word indicates a movement, to me. Research brings me to new information. New conclusions.



Visit the  WELCOME PAGE to learn more about Lynda McKinney Lambert. activities and career.

Lynda McKinney Lambert lives and writes in the Village of Wurtemburg, in Western Pennsylvania.  Her articles and poems appear on a number of blogs, as well as Literary Magazines and books.

View Publications Page for her most recent updates.

Discover Lynda’s other blog, Walking by Inner Vision.


Check out Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

Copyright 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.


“Thanks for rejoicing with me today.  Isn’t God so wonderful!”

Romans 8:28





When from our better selves we have too long
Been parted by the hurrying world, and droop,
Sick of its business, of its pleasures tired,
How gracious, how benign is Solitude!  



I arrived at the Hambidge Center  in Rabun Gap, GA in the summer of 1988. It was late at night.  In the darkness, I drove into the driveway after my long journey from western Pennsylvania. I walked  to the main house where I met the manager  who would take me to where I would live  for the next month. I was going to be doing a Residency  and would be given a studio and place to live where I could do my art every day.  It was a great opportunity and a dream come true for me.

My guide  said, “I hope you like isolation.” My reply was, “Oh, yes! I love isolation.” The fact is, I did not have an inkling what isolation was but it sounded good to me.

Of course, I had no idea what isolation truly was for I had just arrived at this isolated art colony deep in the Georgia mountains. My normal life was back in Pennsylvania where I managed my busy home and family.  I cooked meals from scratch every day for my husband and 5 children. My homemade pies were famous among the ladies at my church.   The first thing I did each morning was 3 loads of Laundry.  In between the layers of  the business of taking care of husband, kids, dogs, cats, and anything else that came up, I was a non-traditional student pursuing the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree.  Every spare moment I could find, I painted.  Painting was my obsession.

Driving up the steep mountain road, I followed his car.  Then we turned onto a pathway to the isolated little house where I would be living and working.  After the man left me there, alone, in the middle of the Blue Ridge Mountains – in utter darkness – I began to get an idea of what solitude would be like. While I was excited to be there, to have this opportunity, I was also stuck with the reality (and fear) of solitude.

My life was changing. I was diagnosed with breast cancer just 2 months before this trip.  And, my father died 2 weeks before the day I found myself alone at night in a strange place where I would live for the next month. My nerves were a frazzle.


But, the month I spent there, away from everyone and everything that was my normal life  was one of the most productive times in my creative life.  In this mountain solitude,  I was united with my “better self.”  Twenty-nine years later, I remain at peace  and solidly united with my “better self.”

Article and Photography by Lunda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright, May 16, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Lynda  McKinney Lambert

.Front Cover



Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage (Kota Press), 2002.


Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017 

Lynda is a Peer Adviser  and writes articles on sight loss and blindness for  Vision Aware Blog

CONTACT ME: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 Author – Blogger – Visual Artist