Friday Favs_The Story Behind a Story

Friday Favs

Article #126

Friday Favs

Can you Find the Story Behind a Story?

“Girl on a Bench Sees Visions of Butterflies”

Friday Favs – I looked back at some of my blog posts  in my other blog,

Walking by Inner Vision.

I started that blog in 2009, and most of what I feature there  is about my writing  or art projects.

You can find

Walking by Inner Vision

at this Link:  www.lyndalambert.com

I was surprised  when I read one of my stories from 2013.

A version of the  story is published in my latest book, “Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems,” DLD Books, 2017. I began to think more about it.

The topic of this essay is an explication of a work of art.

It is the “Story Behind the Story,” of that art work.

All Art Comes From Our  Core Beliefs and Our  World View.

( Note; this art work is “Girl on a Bench Sees Visions of Butterflies,” a mixed-media fiber wall work.

This art work  is in the InSights18 exhibition  sponsored annually by the American Printing House for the Blind.  I will attend  the opening reception and the awards banquet in Louisville, KY, in October. This year will mark the 5th time I have been juried into this international exhibition, and my 5th time to have my work win an award.)

I say  this because it is important for us to be able to articulate where our ideas, influences, and themes  begin when we are writing. Everything we believe, is evident in our piece of writing. If the reader knows how to do a deep reading and is observant, that reader can know about the author intimately. The writing comes from not only our thoughts, but from our spirit and from our own experiences.

We have a core belief, that is uniquely our own. We have a distinctive world view that we each embrace.  Everything we do and think about comes from our core and our chosen world view.  Everything we write reflects who we are – at our core. We have an inner life which becomes visible to our readers, if they are observant and wise.  Who we are speaks clearly in our writing.

When we are aware of this, we can identify an authors core beliefs and world view as we begin to read a piece of the writing.

This is a fascinating aspect of our writing, isn’t it!

In my  classrooms at the college, students  learned how to do deep readings and how to identify the author’s World View. If they don’t learn how to do this, they will never be able to fully understand the writing.

Often we are not even aware of those unseen and powerful impulses.  When we do begin to recognize them and can begin to articulate them, we untap an ocean of possibilities and opportunities in our writing life.

When I read my own blog post from 2013 this morning, I was aware that I am a visual artist and that everything I write emerges from  my  inborn sensibility and a way of viewing the world and everything I encounter. No matter what theme I am writing about,  it is, always  viewed through core beliefs and a keenly aware world  view.

Have you looked back at something you wrote some years ago?

How did it make you feel when you read that piece?

Do you see the theme of the work as it fits into your World View?

Do you see how you have grown or changed in your concepts and writing since that time?

If you want to see the 2013 article  – CLICK HERE: http://www.lyndalambert.com/the-story-behind-the-art/

__________

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright: September, 2018. All rights reserved.

Friday Favs 

is a series coordinated by Lynda and Miss Opal, her feline writing partner.  Lynda and Miss Opal live in rural western Pennsylvania in The Village of Wurtemburg.

Lynda is the author of 4 books:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage Buy it!

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems Buy it!

Lynda has just completed her 3rd book

Star Signs: New & Selected Poems – not yet published.

AND… her FIRST CHAPBOOK

first snow, 16 Poems with a Wintry Theme – Not yet published.

Both new books  are now available for publication. 

Currently Lynda is working on her next book, a Memoir.

Thank you for visiting with us today.

Miss Opal and Lynda McKinney Lambert

Your COMMENTS, QUESTIONS, and SUGGESTIONS are always welcome.

PLEASE SHARE by Re-Blogging this article on Social Media. 

I only require that you copy/paste the entire blog post including our Copyright and blog information.

We LOVE YOU for that!   

Miss Opal & Lynda

Welcome YOU to

Friday Favs

Saturday is for Sharing – Amy Bovaird –

Post #122 – Aug. 25, 2018

Saturday is for Sharing

Series of Guest Authors – #8

Miss Opal & Lynda

Welcome YOU to

Saturday is for Sharing 

_____

Meet Amy Bovaird

Seeking Solace: Finding Joy After Loss

 

 

  

Hi Amy,   I am so pleased to present your books and hear your thoughts today on SCAN.

Your life-long love of travel and your humorous adventures abroad,  teaching English as a Second Language, seem to be  the backbone of  your writing.  No matter what the story is about, we get an excellent view of the world as you experienced it.  You bring us along wherever you are, in your writing. I’ve been reading your stories for a number of years.

Recently, I listened to the Spring/Summer issue of “Magnets & Ladders Literary Magazine.” This magazine was  recorded on digital cassette by the Perkins Library. I really enjoyed hearing your essay, “The Sweet Breath of Africa,” which won an Honorable Mention for non-fiction.  This story is about an African nurse  who took care of you while you were alone, in a foreign country,  in a hospital. It is a beautiful  and sensitive story. I have listened to it twice because it is so compelling. You are a natural storyteller, Amy.   Read this story here:  https://www.magnetsandladders.org/#the-sweet-breath-of-africa-memoir-nonfiction-)honorable-mentionwzxhzdk47by-amy-bovaird

Q_ What do you think about your name and do you use a pen name for your books?

Amy_ There is so much to a name, and over the years, I have learned not only to appreciate but also to cherish mine. My three siblings are named after other respected family members, but my mother said she chose my name simply because she liked it. That is so sweet, all by itself. As I traveled overseas to teach, having a small three-letter name like ‘Amy’ fit just right. My last name—French in origin—posed problems so my overseas students called me “Miss Amy.” This made me feel close to them; it facilitated stronger relationships and forged cultural ties.

In one class, which focused on teaching strategies for TOEFL, a college-entrance exam needed for non-native students to enter western universities, we came across the word, “amicable.” My Indonesian student said, “This is you, my teacher.” His observation filled my heart with gratitude. At some point, I heard the term, “Bon ami,” French for ‘good friend. and added that on to the lovely nuances of my name. It also has roots in Spanish, “amistad,” which means “friendship,” and “amor,” which means love. That described me well as I loved to make new friends. Later, I learned my name meant “beloved.” At that time, my walk with Christ was deepening, so my given name became even more meaningful.

I think it’s amazing how God ensures we have the tools we need to succeed in our careers—and that certainly includes the name we go by. I went by it as a teacher and I also use it as a writer.

Q_What have you done recently that really made you feel good about yourself?

Amy_ In the 90s I had the most wonderful job ever—teaching specialized English terms (think map reading, tanks, helicopters, etc.) to international military personnel at the Defense Language Institute at Lackland Air Force Base. I even helped set up language programs overseas. I left my job to marry an Egyptian Captain and teach in a civilian women’s college in the Middle East. I could never duplicate the unique teaching environment I had at Lackland.

About three weeks ago, one of my former colleagues and I met up in San Antonio and reunited with past co-workers. It was a whirlwind of excitement, beginning with an unexpected stop at the base from the airport and two full days of meeting up with memorable colleagues. It was also the best thing I could ever do for myself – to reconnect with the bold, daring teacher and intrepid traveler I once was in the days before the huge drop in my vision. It was good to remember I was still that person.

Q_ Are you a “Mountain,” “Valley,” or “Beach” person?

 Amy__I am definitely a mountain gal. Give me a backpack and I’ll climb high! I have a couple of humorous anecdotes in my second book, Cane Confessions: The Lighter Side of Mobility, about climbing mountains in Scotland and Japan. You can probably guess the challenges of climbing the Scottish mountain named Goatfell! There’s something about the high altitude that goes hand-n-hand with adventure.

 

Q_ What is your most notable achievement or accomplishment to date?

Amy_  I am  quite proud of my second book launch. I collaborated with the Sight Center of Northwest Pennsylvania to unveil Cane Confessions. We found a great location to hold the launch, a large senior center in our area. We put our heads together to create a strong line-up of speakers for our program.

The CEO of the Sight Center was our emcee. She introduced each speaker for the event. Other speakers included the director of the Bureau of Blindness and Visual Services. This organization provides counseling, training aids, rehab and orientation and mobility to those who are blind or have low vision. Another speaker was on the Board of Directors for the Sight Center but also represented Pennwriters, a state-wide group of writing professionals of which I am a member. It also included the head of the Lions Club (of which I belong), followed by a leader dog (guide) trainer with her leader puppy. The keynote speaker was a laser eye surgeon, who I asked to speak on gene therapy. I also spoke and read a humorous passage from my book. The line-up ended with my pastor, who prayed for the outreach of my memoir, and also for the food.

While we served cake and punch, and I signed books,

we had a fabulous new group perform some original music,

including one song they wrote specifically tor the launch.  One of the group members was from Pennwriters.

We even had someone to take the money for the books, so I only had to focus on signing and connecting with those who came to purchase them.

I don’t think any of us expected such an incredible, comprehensive program to unfold without a hitch! We were thrilled! Unfortunately, although we sent out a slick press release to the media, they failed to show up. What a shame as my launch showcased so many facets of assistance available to the visually impaired community. We certainly put up a united front. It is still one of my fondest memories.

 

Q_ Tell us more about how you began to write books. 

Amy_ The first professional paid writing job I fell into was a ghostwriter job. I wrote a memoir my client termed as “the greatest love story ever told.” It was an upbeat story of my client and his wife (the love of his life) as they dealt with her ovarian cancer. I was so proud of it when I finished it.

That prepared me to write my own memoirs. I have written two books about mobility (using a white cane), which includes elements of fear, faith, humor and adventure. (I am currently working on my third and final mobility book. I plan to finish the series by December of this year).

Seeking Solace: Finding Joy After Loss

is the memoir I want to share with you today.  This new book combines my faith and experiences in a devotional format. It consists of forty-five devotions where God met my needs at desperate points of loss during my time in the Middle East. The first section focuses on loss in childbearing. The second section focuses on getting through divorce. The final section focuses on coping with the discovery of my father’s stage-four cancer while I was in the Middle East.

Writing these devotions helped me better understand how God carried me through my heartbreak. My devotions reminded me how God had ministered to me in the past, which, in turn, helped me recall who was in control of my life. Certainly not me. I was deeply grieving over the loss of my mother, who was eighty-seven. One day she was fine; the next, she suffered a massive stroke. You think you’ll be prepared when an elderly parent passes away but few of us truly are. The loss of a loved one causes grief no matter what the age of the one you love or of the bereaved.

The greater purpose in writing this memoir was to reach out to others facing similar losses. When I go to speak, not everyone can relate to challenges of my sight loss. However, many can relate to losing a child or a parent. Additionally, one out of every two marriages end in divorce nowadays. There is a great need to know God will remain firmly at our side in those frightening moments when we face our biggest fears, failures and disappointments. All devotionals show testimony and mine does the same, only thematically.

 

If I could pick a page that would sum up of the message of my devotional book it might be found in this devotion.

LOVE TRANSCENDS TOUCH

 “‘I will give them comfort and joy instead of sorrow,’ declared the Lord.”
–Jeremiah 31:13, NIV


When Noor died, everything happened quickly. Nadir completed the legalities for her birth and death at the same time. I received no birth certificate or inked footprints to remember her. Nobody brought Noor to my bedside, so I could hold her and say goodbye. Nadir carried her shrouded body away. He placed her directly into a gravesite somewhere in a Dubai cemetery I would never see. Losing a baby in utero devastated me. It left me without even a photograph—as if conceiving her never happened. My second twin’s heart beat together with mine. I nurtured and sang to her, fought and prayed for her. After I delivered Noor, the nurses whisked her away to an incubator. Most of the time, my emergencies kept me from going to her. Except for One. Special. Moment. I reached through the incubator holes to stroke tiny legs—my first touch. One time to last forever.

My lack of input and involvement in the burial left gaping wounds. I cradled a single Polaroid the doctor snapped of Noor shortly after birth. Nadir hid the photo. He believed it unhealthy and wanted me to move forward. But I had no closure.

That summer, I wept for the missing rituals and mementoes that typically accompany motherhood. To fill that gap, God gave me a beautiful song about love being deeper than touch. The lyrics slowly filled the void, like rays of hope seeping through a heavy black cloud.

The words seemed penned for my twins and me. When I listened to that song, I thought about how beautiful it was to have those hearts beating inside me for even a short time. I believe one day I’ll have that privilege again.

 

Heavenly Father, thank you for scripting special words to heal our unique pain.

 _____________________

 

Contact information:

Name: Amy L. Bovaird

Book Title: Seeking Solace: Finding Joy After Loss

Email: mailto:amybovairdauthor@gmail.com

Website: https://amybovaird.com/

Book Description: https://amybovaird.com/seeking-solace/

Blog: https://amybovaird.com/blog/

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/amybovairdauthor/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Amy_Bovaird

Amazon: https://amzn.to/2ls28BO

*Book is available in regular, large print, ebook and audio.

Audio is available at Audible.com, iTunes, Amazon and my website.

_______________________

Dear Readers of SCAN,

Your support of our Featured Guest Authors is  appreciated.

Here’s how YOU can spread the HAPPINESS:

Please  share this article with your friends on Social Media and by Re-Blogging.

You can purchase this book: Gift Giving Season is closing in on us already!

Thanks again for your support of the Authors who are featured on Saturday is for Sharing.

________________

Saturday is for Sharing

is brought to you by

Pennsylvania author, Lynda McKinney Lambert and her feline writing partner, Miss Opal.

SCAN is owned by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

Saturday is for Sharing is Lynda’s property. You have permission to SHARE this blog post with your FRIENDS on FaceBook.

Copyright: August 25,, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Please share with your Friends on FaceBook and SHARE to your blog. Please Re-Blog this article and spread the HAPPINESS.

I only ask that you re-post the entire article with the copyright information attached.

Leave Miss  Opal and Lynda some comments and let us know what you liked about this feature story today.

 

SHARE Good Thoughts

and Happiness

EVERY day!

 

Saturday is for Sharing – David L. Faucheux

Post #118

Saturday is for Sharing

Across Two Novembers: A Year in the Life of a Blind Bibliophile

by David L. Faucheux

 

Miss Opal & Lynda

Welcome YOU to

Saturday is for Sharing 

_____

Meet David L. Faucheux

Across Two Novembers: A Year in the Life of a Blind Bibliophile

 

 

  

Lynda_ I’ve been hearing so many good reports on your first book, Betweeen Two Novembers.  I am so pleased to present your book and hear your thoughts today on SCAN. Thank you for coming to our little SCAN office here in Western Pennsylvania. You’ve come a long way to visit with us today.

Miss Opal_ Our readers will know so much more about you and your life-long love of books and reading. I have a few questions for you this morning, just to get the conversation started. I always worry I won’t remember what I wanted to say, so I will begin first with my question for you.

 

Miss opal_ I am going to ask my favorite question!

What could you never live without? And, why? What wold happen if this would go away?   That is something that I always worry about myself, David. I hate to lose things!

David_ Books and libraries. Let me tell you why and how I actually wanted to make my love of books and libraries my job. Part of this essay is taken from an article I wrote in 2001, at a time before Bookshare had taken off, before Kindle and eBooks, before Audible and BARD.

“What is a library?” Depends on whom you ask, right? For me, this question immediately conjures up that hot summer many years ago. My guide dog, Nader, and I had just entered library school at the Louisiana State University School of Library and Information Science in Baton Rouge. I had been emailing the dean for months, endeavoring to discuss the many concerns I had. Yes, I knew I was throwing the faculty and other LSU officials a proverbial curve ball. I was sitting in the auditorium, wondering what I was doing there, overdressed in a silk tie and linen blazer, and listening to the dean talk about professionalism and what that meant, with Nader was blissfully half-dozing at my feet, tail occasionally twitching.

LYNDA_I am a former professor, so I am getting the picture here that you are creating.  I can’t help but ask you to talk a little more about your academic challenges.  I am thinking about how a blind man would be so interested in pursuing the disciplines that you were thinking about. How did that work for you?

David_  I know, it  may seem almost ironic to some that a blind person would even be interested in a profession that upon first consideration might seem to be so dependent on sight. For as long as I can remember, my interest in reading has been counterbalanced by the scarcity of braille and recorded materials. As a result of eagerly awaiting the next book in the mail during school breaks, having my aunt look up words in her encyclopedia during long weekend visits, later having the 145-volume 1959 edition Braille World Book literally at my fingertips during junior high study hall, and developing various strategies to obtain materials in high school and college, I have become increasingly concerned with the availability of print materials to the blind library patron.

Miss Opal_ But what do you get from a library?

David_ For me, that question is complicated by my rapid vision loss. I remember as a child during the endless summers of swimming lessons and crafts classes also going to the public library with my mother and brothers. They looked at shelves of books, adult novels for her, and books my mother thought we would like. She often read to us before bed. I remember wondering if breakfasting on green eggs and ham would be half as repulsive as the Dr. Seuss character Sam-I-Am insisted and if buying a feline as sagacious as The Cat in the Hat would be possible. I remember liking the stereopticon slides that lived in a box that reposed on top of one of the low bookcases in the children’s room below a window. I even listened to the long-playing recordings of what I later learned were Newbery books. I just thought they were funny-smelling records with a silhouette of a profile and a gold medallion. They were never long enough. I was always running out of books to hear.

Miss Opal_ But isn’t a library more?”

David_  Yes, it is. After I lost my remaining vision, I turned more and more to a different kind of library: a postal library. That’s right, a postal library. Let me explain. The Library of Congress National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped is a network of cooperating regional libraries that serves those who meet the qualifications. I would receive mysterious black cardboard–later blue plastic–containers full of slow-playing records. My talking book machine was my magic carpet to such fantastic realms as Oz, the center of the earth, the moon, Venus, the Italy of Romeo and Juliet, and the mitochondria of a cell. I endured the exquisite suspense of Madeline L’Engle, laughed at The Jack Tales and some Scott Corbett books, and was scared to death by several John Bellairs books. I had a hard and fast rule: Talking books were for home, and braille books were for school. I rarely wavered from this rule. And then 4-track, slow-speed cassettes made their appearance. I enjoyed the portability, ease of storage, and knowing that each pale green box held hours of listening and even a kind of para-social-friendship. I learned to speed-listen. I used the variable speed control switch to gradually increase the speed of the machine. This made reading books such as Jennings’s Aztec, Clavell’s Noble House, or Michener’s Texas faster by 50 percent. I do also remember the torture of waiting for the library in Baton Rouge to send a replacement for a cassette that had the impertinence to break before I had finished it.

And I’m glad that because of so many online and physical resources today, I never have to wonder what I’d do if books and libraries disappeared!

 

Lynda_ Your thoughts on what a library is are so interesting TO US, dAVID.

iT MADE ME THINK more about What would you like to know more about? 

David_  I  have always been subtly aware of scents and fragrances. Certain perfumes take me back. One day in 1996 when a student came into my braille class, I instantly thought of my sixth grade teacher. The student’s perfume was Wind Song, by Prince Matchabelli. This floral perfume was launched in 1953 and has top notes of coriander, orange leaf, mandarin orange, tarragon, neroli, bergamot, and lemon. Middle notes include cloves, carnation, orris root, jasmin, ylang-ylang, rose, and Brazilian rosewood. The base notes that anchor this fragrance are sandalwood, amber, musk, benzoin, vetiver, and cedar. The ingredients seem so exotic and sing of foreign climes,  mystery, and romance.

 

lYNDA_ Tell us about how you began to write your book.  Please give us a sample page  that would sum up what the book is about and give us insight into your themes.

David_ My book was written to take you into my world. I wanted my voice to be heard. Seems today, everyone is being heard somewhere: on a reality TV show or on Twitter, Facebook, or other online venues. I wanted to add my voice to the growing field of memoirs by blind authors. In any event, I put the fears of writing and disclosing aside and jumped in. Here is how I explain it in the introduction to Across Two Novembers: A Year in the Life of a Blind Bibliophile, which I am now attempting to have produced as an audio abridgement, as well as in print and e-book formats, with a slightly different title.

I have long wanted to write and publish something, be it an historic novel, a young adult novel, or nonfiction. When, in November 2013, Dr. Katherine Schneider asked me to read and review her just–published Occupying Aging, I conquered my usual reservations: Would I be a good reviewer? Would I be able to write something interesting and help her book sales? I dove in and came up with this review, which appeared on http://www.goodreads.com:

This book, with its mixture of the quotidian and sublime, stands as an interesting glimpse into the life of one early 21st–century woman. Schneider, a retired psychologist, recounts a year of thoughts and events in this journal. Her ruminations on death, spirituality, dogs, and navigating the landscape of the sighted as a totally blind inhabitant of her Wisconsin college town are enlightening. Touches of humor involving Fran, her Seeing Eye® dog, add a sense of fun.

As someone who is acquainted with Dr. Schneider (we have exchanged emails), I could wish I occupied my forties quite as well as she does her sixties. The proactive attempts to educate about disability issues, the volunteering, and the public speaking are outstanding. Maybe some of her enthusiasm for life will rub off on all her readers.—An excellent vade mecum, a handbook, for handling the uncertainties of retirement.

While reading her book and formulating my review, I thought, Oh! I just might be able to write something in this journal–type format. So I jumped in right then, not waiting to begin on the more traditional January 1. I thought that to wait was to postpone indefinitely and fail; to start could mean a chance at a successful resolution. Who says a journal has to run from January 1 to December 31 to be of interest?

Miss Opal_ So, everyone, here goes nothing!  I just have to ask you, David, about something else that is on my mind. I hope that is ok with you.  Tell me, what is your idea of the perfect job? What would you be doing if it were your job? What do you think is the best job ever? Wold this be Plan A for your life?

David_ I would like to collaborate on a multi-media project documenting a group of students pursuing the MFA in Gastronomy offered by Boston University. What a book that would make! It would be along the lines of Snapshots from Hell, released in the early 1990s, about the author’s quest to obtain a Stanford MBA, or that book One L , by Scott Turow, that describes his first year of Harvard Law School. The project could be built around several students and their experiences with course work, internships, and even early employment.

Lynda_ If you could write or commission any kind of book, what would it be? Have you given that any thought now that this first book is finished?

David_  I have several ideas and will briefly discuss each below. They range from fictional biography to historic fiction and end with a short story collection.

* Empress Eugénie of France: She was just as interesting as Empress Elizabeth of Hapsburg or Queen Victoria, two of her contemporaries. But I find no writer today who has done anything with her, either fictionalized or straight biography. If French writers have covered her, I have not located the translations. She lived at a particularly interesting time and reigned over the carnival that was the empire of Napoleon III. It all came tumbling down in 1871, and she later lost her son in a hunting accident in South Africa. She lived until 1920. Surely, if Marie Antoinette rates high enough, Empress Eugénie should.

Eugénie lived during a time of convulsive change. Three empires toppled during her lifetime. The new nations of Germany and Italy were born.

* Inca: Gary Jennings wrote Aztec. (Actually, there were several follow-up novels to his Aztec, but it was Aztec that was outstanding; the others were possibly written at the suggestion of an editor to cash in on Aztec’s success). I always hoped Jennings would live long enough to write about the Inca, to do for that South American people what Aztec did for Mexico.

* A short story collection about my days at a residential school for the blind: I could possibly do this with some guidance. This type of school is rapidly fading from memory. Most blind students today are mainstreamed into public schools. In the 1970s, this was not always the case.

 

Lynda_  They SAY “TIME FLIES WHEN YOU ARE HAING FUN,  i SEE OUR TIME IS JUST ABOUT OVER AND YOU NEED TO LEAVE US.   we HAVE ENJOYED YOUR VISIT TODAY AND WE WILL BE WATCHIG TO SEE WHAT NEW PROJECT YOU HAVE COMING OUT IN THE FUTURE. H FOR COMING TO SEE US.

Additional information on David can be found on Joan Myles blog:

Read David Faucheux interview here!

David L. Faucheux

Author of Across Two Novembers: A Year in the Life of a Blind Bibliophile

Scopist65@gmail.com

http://www.dldbooks.com/davidfaucheux/

BUY  the book –  Click on the link above.

_______________________

Dear Readers of SCAN,

Your support of our Featured Guest Authors is  appreciated.

 

Here’s how YOU can spread the HAPPINESS:

Please  share this article with your friends on Social Media and by Re-Blogging.

You can purchase this book: Between Two Novembers, DLD Books, 2017.

It would be a fantastic gift for giving over the holidays – just ahead!

 Thanks again for your support of the Authors who are featured on Saturday is for Sharing.

________________

Saturday is for Sharing

is brought to you by

Pennsylvania author, Lynda McKinney Lambert and her feline writing partner, Miss Opal.

SCAN is owned by Lynda McKinney Lambert. & Miss Opal, her feline writing assistant,.

 

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

Saturday is for Sharing is Lynda’s property. You have permission to SHARE this blog post with your FRIENDS on FaceBook.

Copyright: August 11, and December 9,  2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Please share with your Friends on FaceBook and SHARE to your blog. Please Re-Blog this article and spread the HAPPINESS.

Leave Miss  Opal and Lynda some comments and let us know what you liked about this feature story today.

 

SHARE The HAPPINESS

We Love You for That!

 

Just SCAN it!

Just  SCAN It!

SCAN: A blog

written by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

A quiet Place of Inspiration – We Love Literature!

 

 In 2018, I AM ABIDING 

WHAT DOES it mean

~ to abide?

This is my ONE WORD for 2018.  I won’t be doing anything in a RUSH. I’m taking my TIME and WAITING to publish  special articles that will encourage you and lift your spirit.

I’ll SHARE  thoughtful articles and I’ll share the work of other notable writers, editors, authors, and artists on my pages.

Thank you for visiting with us today.

SCAN (the blog) ~ created

by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

 

Why call the blog, SCAN?

Let’s have a LOOK at the word SCAN.

 SCAN  is a verb and a noun

Definition of scan for English Language Learners

  • : to look at (something) carefully usually in order to find someone or something

  • : to look over or read (something) quickly

  • : to look at the inside of (something) by using a special machine

I am a visual artist and author who is visually impaired. Everything I do depends on the use  of equipment that is developed for BLIND and VISUALLY IMPAIRED users.

 

Scan

(quoted from dictionary dot com)

 

14 Definitions of the word, SCAN:

 

verb (used with object), scanned, scanning.

1.

to glance at or over or read hastily:

to scan a page. 

The purpose of this blog will be to TAKE A LONGER LOOK at LITERATURE, AUTHORS, BOOKS, ARTISTS, and ART. We love LITERATURE and ART here at SCAN. 

to examine the particulars or points of minutely; scrutinize.

3.

to peer out at or observe repeatedly or sweepingly, as a large expanse;survey.

4.

to analyze (verse) as to its prosodic or metrical structure; read or recite(verse) so as to indicate or test the metrical form.

5.

to read (data) for use by a computer or computerized device, especially usingan optical scanner.

6.

Television. to traverse (a surface) with a beam of light or electrons in order toreproduce or transmit a picture.

7.

Radar. to traverse (a region) with a beam from a radar transmitter.

verb (used without object), scanned, scanning.

8.

to examine the meter of verse.

9.

(of verse) to conform to the rules of meter.

10.

Television. to scan a surface or the like.

SCAN as a noun

11..

an act or instance of scanning; close examination.

12..

a visual examination by means of a television camera, as for the purpose ofmaking visible or relaying pictures from a remote place:

a satellite scan of the dark side of the moon; video scans of property listingsavailable to customers.

13.

a particular image or frame in such video observation or a photograph made from it.

14.

a blog written by Lynda McKinney Lambert

 Meet Miss Opal. She is my writing companion and together WE SCAN the BEST BOOKS and INVITE the BEST AUTHORS to TELL THEIR STORIES on our blog, SCAN. 

IF YOU are an AUTHOR with a recently published book – in the past 2 years –

 

Miss Opal & Lynda

want you to tell your story

on SCAN.

Visit our INVITATION PAGE to learn more about how YOU can be our special guest on

“Saturday is for SHARING” feature.

Click Here to get your INVITATION NOW

Contact Lynda and Miss Opal at:  riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 

 

 

 

_____

Brought to you by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

Visit me at Lynda Lambert’s Website

Find my latest book at 

My Authors Page.

 

ABIDE with ME

2018

___ONE WORD___

ABIDE

For the 4th year, I selected ONE WORD

to guide my intentions.

 

 

Why did I choose ABIDE?  

Abide is a VERB. 

verb (used without object), abode or abided, abiding

1.

to remain; continue; stay; stand

 

2.

to have one’s abode; dwell; reside

 

3.

to continue in a particular direction, condition, attitude, relationship, path; last.

 

 

I discovered  that my ONE WORD seems to FIND ME. That particular word

ABIDE

seemed to hover around for a while in my everyday life. The thought of it  kept on coming into my awareness for the past few weeks.  I seemed to KNOW it is the right word for my year.

 

My ONE WORD FEELS right.

 

Did you know?

We have God-given INTUITION.

Our personal intuition GUIDES US much better than a GPS.

We have accurate and specific DIRECTION for our life. Pay attention to it.

We all have INTUITION  –  a still, small voice inside of us.

Listen for it.

 

Have YOU thought about choosing ONE WORD that will guide you in the direction you intend to go this year?

 

What comes to your mind right now?

Grab ONE WORD and make it YOURS!

 

 

 

___________

Lynda McKinney Lambert is a Western Pennsylvania author and visual artist.

View Publications Page for updates.

Lynda’s  Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

this blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright December 30, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

“Thanks for rejoicing with me today.  Isn’t God so wonderful!”

Romans 8:28

An Intentional Year! 2017

Re: Inspiration in 2017 – riverwoman43@gmail.com – Gmail

2017 – INTENTIONAL

INSPIRATIONAL

SUCCESSFUL – 2017

CHANGE Our THOUGHT LIFE

Let’s agree to enjoy a tremendously successful 2017.

I’ve worked last week on setting my “intentions” for this year.
My list is finished now and I recorded my INTENTIONS for 2017  into a word document.
My list of intentions is on my computer in a FILE. where I can have a LOOK  at it periodically during the year.

SPEAK EACH INTENTION  OUT LOUD

Yes! Speak them out loud! I consider them as already manifest in my life. It is not a wish list or a list of resolutions and not even a goal plan. It is far more. Intentions have WINGS.
I consider them as already ACCOMPLISHED  in my life.

What it is NOT:

Your List of INTENTIONS  is not a wish list

Not a list of New Year’s resolutions

Not a goal plan

It is far more. Intentions have WINGS.

I’ll have a LOOK  at my  LIST  periodically during the year.  I speak them out loud and I consider them as already manifest in my life. It is not a wish list or a list of resolutions and not even a goal plan. It is far more. Intentions have WINGS.
I speak them out loud and I consider them as already accomplished.

Will YOU join me in 2017?

Have you considered setting your own intentions?

Just ONE MORE Thing

While you are setting your INTENTIONS, why not also give yourself ONE WORD for the year?

The “ONE WORD” you choose will become your reality in 2017.

My “one word” for the year is “INTENTIONAL.”

This is my 3rd year to embrace ONE WORD that will be for ME during the entire year.
(My word for 2015 was Exuberance 2016 was Extraordinary; 2017 is Intentional)
You can find more information on how to set your intentions & recognize your desires in a small book that I recommend.

Deepak Chopra’s book:

Seven Spiritual Laws for Success

The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success

In particular, Chapter 5:  “The Law of Intention & Desire.” In just over 100 pages, Chopra covers all bases and lays down a clear path to follow. I return to this book again and again. I find it to be useful for all areas of life.

ONE FINAL THOUGHT

Caution: Do NOT tell anyone about your intentions or what they are!
Keep them to yourself.
Next year at this time, you’ll be so happy to share them and let your friends & family know how you achieved the wonderful success you have.
Happy New Year to all! I hope to hear from you NEXT YEAR  to let me know how it is going for your own life!
Read MORE about Setting Intentions &
Choosing One Word: Just One Word, Please!
******
Copyright, January 1, 2017. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.
Lynda Lambert
Writes 2 blogs:
Walking by Inner Vision
and…SCANdaloud-Recollections.
Author of:
    Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage (Kota Press)
    Walking by Inner Vision: Stories of Light and Dreams (to be released in early 2017)
Vision Aware Peer Advisor, AFB
Blogger – Author – Visual Artist

Lynda Lambert – Live

December 19, 2016.

You can enjoy this conversation now.

Writing with Intention – Set your INTENTIONS for 2017

Lynda McKinney Lambert – Writing with Intention, presented LIVE on Branco Boracast on Recorded LIVE.

 

 

Knitting15_Scarf9_4 Thanks for flying with me in 2015 on SCANdalous-Recollections.

Lynda McKinney Lamber

Visit my website at lyndalambert.com

 

Gentle Zephyr

Gentle Zephyr is an Abecedarian Poem.

Each new lines is a letter of the alphabet. Look down the LEFT side of the poem and you will see the first line begins with “A” and the final line ends with “Z.”

*****

 

Gentle Zephyr

 

Angel of the Lord

by night you

called me without warning.

“Do not be afraid,” you said.

Even so, I shuddered

fearful and ashamed as you

granted me a message

“Holy, holy, holy,” you sang.

I heard you that lonely night

“Just as I am?”  I AM. “Let me

keep this night forever

locked in my memory,” I thought.

Miraculous, our Messiah has arrived. We are

night watchers near the City of David

only Jehovah saw value in us.  

Patiently, we kept waiting

quietly, the angel came; a brilliant star

revealed the message to

shepherds! The sheep barely stirred,

Tonight, the sky was falling, spinning,

until the Angel spoke. Divine

visitations are unexpected. I’ve been

waiting for the One called

X is for the newborn Christ. Oh, come, Emmanuel.

YHWH.  El Shaddi. Come quickly, gentle

Zephyr.

_____

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright 2016. All rights reserved.

Visit Lynda Lambert at www.lyndalambert.com

 

MERRY CHRISTMAS to ALL

 

Lynda’s Travel Tips

What is so important that I had to

get up at 4 a.m. to write a blog ?

 

I’m leaving for Louisville, Kentucky tomorrow.

I’ll attend the American Printing House for the Blind Conference.

Why am I going? It’s because my art work is in the annual international art exhibition and I won a prize. I’ll be a guest at the conference along with other artists, and I’ll get a tour of the facilities, attend a reception for the art show, and even attend the banquet where I’ll receive an award for my work. All super exciting.  And, best of all, three of my daughters will be with me on this trip.  It will take us about 8 hours to get there and we will leave tomorrow morning.

Have I packed yet?

Of course, NOT!

 

photo_16_travel-bag

If I pack too soon then I’ll have second thoughts and make myself crazy by selecting and de-selecting everything I picked out for the trip. It’s hard for me to FOCUS with so many choices available. I have to order the chaos.

I’ll force myself to pack my little weekender bag. It’s such a cute one in hot pinks and oranges – happy colors for happy packing, I guess.
Later today – I love to travel but I hate packing for a trip. I’d like to have someone come and make the selections for me, and SECRETLY pack my bag. Let someone else make my choices for me – select the clothing, jewelry, and all. Secretly. Then, when I arrive, I ‘ll be surprised at what I brought
But, I have my own way of making choices. I begin with what is most important for me.
First, I select the kick-A** jewelry I want to wear while I am away. Yep, the jewelry comes FIRST. After that, I go to the closet and find the clothing that will best show off the jewelry. Finally, I pick a pair of shoes that will WORK with it all. Keep it simple. Just one small bag.
But there is one thing I have done in anticipation for this journey. I bought the snacks! But, there’s a problem with buying the snacks too soon, too. Three of the super large size candy bars I bought for the trip are now missing. Well, my friend Rosella once told me that if you stand at the sink and eat, the food has no calories. So, I did.

Pennsylvania Spring

Gallery

This gallery contains 5 photos.

Pennsylvania Spring The final week of May in Pennsylvania Photos from my early morning walk. Rhododendrum  is a STAR at this time of year. Look for it in shady places, forests and woodlands.             Delicate … Continue reading