Morning Hour

Post #215

November 19 2019

“Morning Hour”

a poem by

Lynda McKinney Lambert

from her new chapbook

first snow

 

Listen to Lynda McKinney Lambert reading her poem, “Morning Hour.”

 

Morning Hour

by Lynda McKinney Lambert

A nippy breeze

wrapped around my bare feet

like soft gray cashmere clouds.

In the early morning hour

My own reflection

slowly materialized-

I was exposed, naked,

on a clear icy glass

surface.

Outside the frozen windowpane,

an icicle boundary

surrounded my view

of the aging Douglas Fir.

I turned for a closer look

through the silent porthole

Quick movements

in the shadow

revealed

one tiny ruffled bird,

a solo performer

hunkered down, deep,

on snow-clogged branches.

Inside, this room

a blizzard-

a scattering of words still lingered-

Waited to be gathered,

In a winter bouquet-written on a page,

in spite of the bitter cold.

We have been here

for a thousand years

In the early morning hour.

*

Published:

Lambert, Lynda McKinney, Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017.

Lambert, Lynda McKinney. first snow, chapbook, 22 Poems. Finishing Line Press, January 3, 2020.

Courtesy of PA Author and Poet –

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

*

first snow is a beautiful collection of 30 poems

 Order Your Copy Here!

Order NOW. Your chapbook will be shipped on January 3, 2020.

Just in time for a Beginning-of-the-New-Year gift for loved ones.

Think about gifting first snow for a Valentine’s Day gift, too.  Perfect gift of LOVE.  Only 13.99 plus shipping – available ONLY through Finishing Line Press –

After January 3, this chapbook will be available through Amazon – but don’t wait.

 Order Your Copy Here!

 

 

 

Book of the Day

Article #211

September 22, 2019

 

Book of the Day

  “I want to support you and I want to be the first to

kick-off your Pre-Orders for the new book!”

This was what I was told at my recent visit to my eye specialist.

I think I floated out of that office –

I don’t remember my feet touching the ground.

Some days are like this. Some are not.

He has examined my eyes as he has done for the past 12 years, as I lost most of my sight suddenly in 2007. He has encouraged me in my writing and art projects and told me how proud he is of the way I have refused to let sight loss side-line me.

Not only did I leave his office with a great report from my scans today, that everything is holding and I am not losing more sight at this time – but, then, the affirmation he gave me on my newest publication was a little boost that everyone needs from time to time.

And, here is the big surprise I got this evening:

 

For immediate Release: from Lynda McKinney Lambert

September 20, 2019:

 

TODAY:  first snow is Book of the Day on Finishing Line Press.

 

 

first snow  – featured on Finishing Line Press social media sites.  

FLP is running a paid advertisement this week on social media for my new chapbook!

 

About the Author:

Lynda McKinney Lambert, is a retired college professor of fine arts and humanities. Retirement from teaching opened the door for her to write full-time. She explores the themes of landscape, mythology, pilgrimage, fine arts and literature in her writing.

She loves walking through a meadow of wild flowers; gazing at a star-strewn sky; spending solitary winter days with her husband, Bob, their 2 rescued cats and 2 rescued dogs.

ADVANCE PRAISE FOR first snow by Lynda McKinney Lambert 

My grandmother knew the name of every bird by note and call who ever sang to the sun in the fields by her Wisconsin country home, and she knew the names of the trees by bark and needle and leaf in the woods.  In these days of urban desolation and digital isolation, it is harder and harder to keep hold of the once-common natural knowledge.  Here in Lynda Lambert’s poetry the vitality of the seasons is still felt, seen and heard.   Lambert notices the colors and sounds that surround us, those sights and odes that barely register through our buds and pads and windshields, and she names them for us and she remembers them for us.  In these poems, Lambert calls her readers to celebrate the blue spruce in the morning fog, to “stand in darkness / urging Blood Moon-arise and to be alive in the old ways.  “It feels like we have been here,” she says of one icy morning, “for a thousand years.”  In these pages, we have.

–Russell Streur, editor Plum Tree Tavern, author Fault Zones.

 

 

RESERVE YOUR COPY OF THIS LIMITED EDITION TODAY, PREORDER SHIPS JANUARY 3, 2020

https://www.finishinglinepress.com/product/first-snow-by-lynda-mckinney-lambert/ #poetry, #book #booklovers #readers #flp  #poetrylovers #chapbook


4 Sample Poems from  first snow…

 

By Lynda McKinney Lambert

first snow

 

we watch

for the first

snowfall

wait for

silent passage

along the banks of

ancient creeks

 

dull morning light

conceals

gold-plated Gingko leaves

beneath

new-fallen snow

 

from “Dream Sequence” # 4

 

In my dream (#4)

 

I climb upwards

on the ladder I stumbled upon

in the woods one afternoon.

Earth disappears

the ladder is unstable

“Keep it straight up,” I whisper.

“Keep your body centered. Stay poised.”

 

Silver Cloud Dancers

 

Silver clouds swirl & spin in circles

Inflated silence above her golden head. She

Levitates above the floor, reaches for

Variable visions of mesmerizing cloud-pillows.

Eternally drifting in uncertain lifecycles

Round & square. Touch the floating orbs.

 

Cloud dancer stretches her slender hands

Longevity is unpredictable, uncertain

Out-of-the-box survival fluctuates

Undulates

Determined by chemistry & chaos.

 

Dance your memories in silver clouds

Air and pure helium lift in rhythm

No one can calculate your journeys

Choreography of individual flights

Every Friday morning new clouds arrive

Repeat the process of new expectations

Some silver clouds last for a week. Some don’t.

 

My Daughter Cut the Roses

 

My daughter looked

at the bouquet of fresh roses

noticed two of them were drooping.

“Let me show you how to trim the roses

so they stay fresh and strong.” she said.

Her hands held the roses tenderly

One-by-one, trimmed off extra leaves

“These will make the water stink,” she said.

She found scissors in the drawer

put the roses in a bowl of tepid water

held each stem under water

sliced them all, diagonally –

“As I cut the rose under the water,

little bubbles of air come to the surface.

Now, when the rose inhales

it will only breathe water into it,

it won’t fill up with air.

The living water inside the stems

gives longer life to each rose.”

She carried the freshened flowers

In the tall glass vase

back to the center of the dining room table

darkest crimson buds, sunny yellow petals,

deep green fern leaves

and a frilly white carnation.

 

 

First snow is featured today on the following sites:

 

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/finishinglinepr

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/finishinglinepress

Twitter: https://twitter.com/FLPress

Tumblr: http://finishinglinepress.tumblr.com/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/flpbooks

 

-____

 

Lynda’s Authors Page- Amazon:https://www.amazon.com/author/lyndalambert

 

Lynda’s Official Authors Page: http://www.dldbooks.com/lyndalambert/

 

Smashwords – get my e-book:  https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/lyndalambert

 

My Blogs:

Website & Blog:  Lynda McKinney Lambert  – Official Author’s Website

Scan-A-Blog – A quiet Place of Inspiration, Art, Nature, Literature

 

When Night Comes – a Chapbook

I wrote this review of a chapbook by Tennessee Poet, Wes Sims. This lovely book of poetry was published in Campbell’s World, a blog owned  by another Tennessee author, Patty Fletcher.  Thank you, Patty, for your interest in writing and promotion of so many authors.

 

READING WITH THE AUTHORS:

Author Lynda McKinney Lambert Reviews

When Night Comes

Good morning Bookworms everywhere.
After having taken a couple personal days off, Campbell and I are back in action here in campbellsworld.
This morning I’ve a treat for you.
Author Lynda McKinney Lambert is back in our Reading With the Authors column with a review of a poetry that has made even me want to read it.
I’m not one to read such a book as is described here but after reading this review and having read a bit of Lynda’s original work well I have to consider the source and agree to give it a try.
Now I invite you to read Lynda’s thoughts here, and then maybe share a few of your own.
For sure share this post with your friends and make certain to read all about how to find her books before you go.

 

When Night Comes

by Wesley Sims
A Book Review by Lynda McKinney Lambert

I met poet Wes Sims one Sunday morning while reading my weekly issue of a poetry magazine, The Weekly Avocet,  published by Charles Portolano, features poetry that has a nature theme. In one particular issue, I encountered 3 Haiku poems by Sims. Each intrigued me for he presented new ways of looking at something ordinary. The nature-themed poems caught my attention. Since Mr. Portolano encourages his writers to drop a note to other poets and to make friends with them, I sent a note to Wes Sims to say how much I enjoyed his poems.

Eventually, I learned about Wes Sims’ poetry chapbook, “When Night Comes,” because he sent me a copy. I’ve enjoyed reading this 28-page chapbook. It is a collection of twenty-four poems. You can purchase it directly from Wes Sims by contacting him – he will even sign it for you!  (I’ve included his E-mail at the end of this essay.)

The chapbook’s cover is a moody black and white photo of a nocturnal landscape by the author. I thought “This is the perfect image for this collection of poems.” In addition to writing poetry, Sims likes to do photography. I found that the all-seeing-eye of the photographer is apparent in the poems, as I read through this collection. He sees and speaks of little details that might go unnoticed. It is in the description of the little things that we are brought into Sims’ world through his poems.

In “How to Use a Shoebox,” Wes Sims gives us his secret intention for writing:
“the impact of little things preserved” (p.4)

The mostly one-page poems are created by building up layers of finely nuanced accumulations. Sims is actively viewing and preserving as he writes the poems.. Minute images are intertwined with his personal and private memories as he has known them in rural Tennessee.

Sims describes his world – the present and the distant or even the historical past of his rural landscapes in Tennessee. Reading through the poems brings the reader right into his family circle. This is the place where Past and Present merge. The poem becomes a confluence in which time is collapsed. The individuals he presents are not generalized people, but they are family and they are named.

“grandson; grandmother; Mr. Newman; Sister; Dad; Mother; Uncle Bo; Mrs.. Engle…”

This gives us a feeling that we know them personally or that we have just met them even though many of the people who populate his poems are no longer in this world.

But, more than this Sims gives us a deeper understanding of life as he has known it – and we feel like we, too, have lived this life. In the poem, “Eyes to See,” he speaks of watching a blind man…

“Until one day, when I saw
Him in a church setting
Heard his lips sing out in prayer,
And received my revelation—
I was a blind man, too.”
(from “Eyes to See,” p. 24)

Through the book we see deserted old rundown barns and abandoned empty sheds; time-worn, rarely travelled roads up into the hills; and the last days of people who have passed away. No matter where we live or what our life is like, we relate to Wes Sims and his reflections on particular individuals, rural life, death of loved ones;, flowers, dogs, songs, snakes, music, personal memory and history. We know that our lives are enriched by the small things and places we encounter over a lifetime. It all adds up, in the end. Unimportant and trivial things really do matter.

You can find this chapbook for sale on the publishers website:

Buy it at Finishing Line Press, Link here!to read more.
Also available directly from Wes Sims at:   wes4words@att.net

_____

Meet Lynda McKinney Lambert.  Owner of this blog, SCAN.

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems
© 2017 by Lynda McKinney Lambert

Pennsylvania artist, teacher, and author Lynda McKinney Lambert invites readers into her world of profound sight loss to discover the subtle nuances and beauty of a physical and spiritual world. She takes strands from ancient mythology, history, and contemporary life and weaves a richly textured new fabric using images that are seen and unseen as she takes us on a year-long journey through the seasons.
All stories in this book were created after her sudden sight loss in 2007 from Ischemic Optic Neuropathy. Lambert invites us to see the world with new eyes.
Available in e-book ($3.99) and print ($14.95) from Amazon, Smashwords, and other sellers. Full details, free 20% text preview, and buying links: http://www.dldbooks.com/lyndalambert/
Edited by David and Leonore H. Dvorkin of DLD Books: http://www.dldbooks.com/
Cover layout by David Dvorkin / Cover photo and back cover text by the author