Saturday is for Sharing – LKHunsaker

Post #125 – September 8, 2018

Saturday is for Sharing

Series of Guest Authors – #10

Miss Opal & Lynda

Welcome YOU to

Saturday is for Sharing 

_____

LK Hunsaker 

 

Western Pennsylvania Author

 

 

  

Hi LK.

Miss Opal is seated in the window this morning and I can hear a hawk calling as the new day begins.

We  both think it is a treat to feature a Guest Author who is so passionate about MUSIC and want to know more about how  your writing projects what you love.

I am a retired professor of fine arts and humanities, and so much of my own writing is inspired by MUSIC.

Your stories are  of great interest to me and I know they  will be to our readers, too.

Q_ I’d like to start by asking you to give our readers an overview of your writing career and  books you have authored.

LK_  I began writing seriously in 1996. During this time, my husband was active Army and away much of the time, or working very long days, and we had two young children I was raising mainly on my own away from home in a place I detested. So, for the sake of sanity, I picked up my pencil and my long ago habit of writing stories, poetry, and plays, and rewrote a scene that I’d written and lost years before as a young teen. The story has been in my head since then and was inspired by an actual band of the times, meaning mid-1970s. (No, I don’t worry about showing my age. Trust me, it shows.) I started writing in scenes, on paper with pencil, filling binders by putting the scenes in order as I finished them. I wrote until tendonitis set into my wrist and spread into my whole arm up my shoulder, and then I began writing with my left hand until the right healed. The computer has sped things up quite a lot and is far better on my hands!

 

At this time, I have 18 books plus a novella

in a multi-author anthology

out under two writing names:

LK Hunsaker

and

Ella M. Kaye

My LK books run from romantic to literary to historical to art journals and a children’s book.

 

My EMK books are all contemporary romance with psychological elements all centered around the arts, in three series related by setting and art medium (Dancers & Lighthouses, Artists & Cottages, Songwriters & Cities).

 

That scene I wrote in 1996… It’s part of my epic musical saga serial entitled Rehearsal. It will run from 1974 through the mid-Eighties and is a series of 6 books approximately 700 pages each. There will also be a sequel that’s in progress and a prequel that’s in planning stages. Four books have been released, but they are in the midst of an upgrade all under my own publishing company, Elucidate Publishing. A scene from the first book of the series will follow at the end of the interview.

 

 

Q_  Do you have a favorite piece of music or a song that brings back good  memories?  

LK_ I’m music obsessed, and I have been for as long as I can remember. All of my novels include music, along with the whole epic musical saga. Naming one favorite song is rather impossible, so I’ll mention one foremost in my mind at the moment.

 

Two months ago, one of the founders of that band I mentioned, the one that inspired so many hours of writing a novel series so very close to my heart, died of illness brought on while traveling. It was a big blow and a huge mortality reminder that felt like a punch in the gut. His favorite song from his own band was “Don’t Let The Music Die” and so, that song right now brings back wonderful memories of my teen days, of my book-of-heart inspiration, and of every moment Alan Longmuir and his band the Bay City Rollers swept this young teenager away from real life and brought so much joy and upbeat vibes when they were most needed. It also brings the reminder that individual life is finite and we must use our time productively and joyfully, with any luck, leaving a nice legacy to others along the way.

Don’t let the music die…Listen to it here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWJj7SZOuKc

 

Q_ Describe a phone call that surprised you recently. What was it?  

LK_ First, I should say I rarely answer the phone since it’s almost entirely spam and I can’t be bothered with that. I do not like talking on the phone. So when my husband, who doesn’t mind the phone as much, answered and came to tell me it was a radio station about the book festival, I stared at him for several seconds before taking the call.

Four years ago, I started up a little local book festival to help local authors, mainly indies, get the word out into the community about their work. It has grown to the point I have authors from out of state contacting me about attending and we’ve had over 50,000 hits to our website. Still, I did not expect a radio station to call. They were asking about advertising. My first thought: Hey! They’ve heard of us! That’s pretty cool! And then… yes, but my budget is very small. Still, it’s radio.

 

So, this year, the West PA Book Festival, located nearly on the border of west central Pennsylvania (did you know PA is the only state where we literally call our state “P.A.” rather than the actual name?) got airtime on two Cumulus radio stations. WestPABookFestival.com will give you more info about the event. We’re also on Facebook. 😉

Photo of the set-up at the

Western Pa Book Festival.

 

 

Q_ Are you an introvert or an extrovert? What makes you think you belong to that group of people?

LK_I am not only an introvert, but I’m also constantly fighting social anxiety disorder. I love to be home, alone, with either the quiet of nature, windows wide open to hear my birds chirping and trees rustling, or with my music that I play loud and sing along with if no one’s around. I won’t even sing in front of my family, although I used to be in chorus all the way through to college choir, plus church choir.

Even too much social media time is exhausting. A minor online debate will literally make me shake from nerves. Talking to people in person: my first thought is always “Um, no.” So yes, book signings have been tough. They’re also necessary, so for years, I’ve gritted my teeth and gone out there, anyway. The upside to this is that my SAD is lightening up with practice, as I realize I won’t actually have a heart attack and fall right through the floor (or dirt, since I try to stick with outdoor events that are easier than enclosed places events). That said, yes, I still decided to organize and run a book festival. Okay, I may be a little bit nuts. Actually, I’m a lot driven, so although I’d love to just hide away either inside my house or puttering in my garden (I have only one neighbor close enough to somewhat see me when I’m in my yard around the trees between our properties), I know there’s the work to be done of … gasp … marketing! … so out I go. Sometimes. Not nearly as much as I should.

Q_This might be a good spot to share a BOOK WORM with our readers? I think many of us can relate.

Q_ _Do you have a favorite kind of bird or animal? Is it a “totem” animal, to you? When did you first sense or become aware that it was a special creature in your life?

LK_ I love the Cardinal because it was so special to my grandma. I also love the goldfinch because of its bright yellow cheerfulness, and the blue jay because of its beauty and its testy personality. I love labradors and we have a full lab and a mixed lab/border collie. They’re so friendly, so sweet, so good with kids, and very trustworthy.

However, the creature I feel the most connected with is the hummingbird. They’re tiny little things that just go about their business not looking for attention, friendly as far as buzzing around my head if I’m beside their feeder without worrying much about me (they do startle me, since they sound like very large bees!), beautiful with their vivid colors, and they’re always so very busy. You have to look quick to catch them taking a drink (please do not add red food coloring to their nectar) before they’re off on their mission. There are more than 300 species of hummingbirds, all unique in their alikeness.

I’m not sure when I first started taking notice of them. It’s been a lot of years. I particularly love Anna’s Hummingbird with its bright pinkish-purple head and bright green body, but they’re all beautiful and absolutely charming. And yes, I relate to their constant busyness.

~~~

Comment from  LK_ So, there you have it. . Obviously, I do tend to be verbose in writing. Thank you so much, Lynda, for having me here.

I’ll be around for several days answering questions and comments. You can also find me at the following places:

LKHunsaker.com and www.facebook.com/author.lkhunsaker

EllaMKaye.com and www.facebook.com/ellamkaye

My blog: http://lkhunsaker.blogspot.com

~~~

As promised, the excerpt from Rehearsal: A Different Drummer by LK Hunsaker

 

Babe? He hadn’t called her that before. “As Kate told Mike, you better be careful about those promises.”

“Are you goin’ t’ hold me to it?”

Searching his eyes, she kept herself from asking him if it would work if she tried. She couldn’t believe that in such a short time, she would honestly be able to make him stay only because she asked. “I would never want you to do anything against your will, not even for me.” She took his hand and continued down their path.

They didn’t bother to talk and the silence was nice with his fingers entwined in hers, his bare feet making tracks next to hers. They walked far enough their friends’ voices faded out, and farther yet to where the smooth sand ran into large boulders and they had to walk up into the coarser sand to go up around them.

He stopped when the dock came into view. Staring at it.

“Duncan?”

“Is this wha’ y’ wanted me t’ see?” His eyes remained ahead. They were as cool as his manner.

“Yes.”

“Why?”

Susie was puzzled. It was only a dock. There was nothing else there, other than the large boulders making a cove that protected the dock on each side. “Because it’s one of my favorite places. We used to come down here before they closed off the road above. It’s pretty much always deserted now, and I like it even better this way. It’s so quiet.” He didn’t answer. “Was it too far to walk just for this?”

“Your favorite place.”

“One of them. It reminds me of Dad’s cabin, but a lot closer. I love coming here. I just thought it would be nice to share it…” His face had clouded, his breathing forced. “What’s wrong? Why are you upset?” Her stomach turned. She had done something wrong, though she couldn’t imagine what. All she wanted was to share this with him, to be alone, here, surrounded by the peace. And after their kiss, what he’d said about walking anywhere… “We can go back.” When he didn’t answer, she released his hand and started away. Away from the dock. Away from whatever she had done wrong.

He grasped her arm. “Suse, donae go.”

“What did I do?”

“You didnae do anything.” Her silence brought him closer, and his head lowered until it nearly touched hers. “Y’ did no’ do anything. I am sorry. It is … old memories. Some I had tried t’ forget.”

Memories? She thought back, searching her mind for what he already told her. Had she missed something she shouldn’t have? But he hadn’t said much. Almost nothing. Except he had grown up by the water. She remembered that.

He touched her face again, then took her hand and turned toward the dock. “Come.”

 

©2006 LK Hunsaker

Elucidate Publishing:  https://www.alignable.com/mercer-pa/elucidate-publishing

_________

Dear Readers of SCAN,

Your support of our Featured Guest Authors is  appreciated.

Here’s how YOU can spread the HAPPINESS:

Please  share this article with your friends on Social Media and by Re-Blogging

OR – you can copy and paste the entire blog articler into your own FB page or blog.

You can purchase our featured book: Gift Giving Season is closing in on us already!

Thanks again for your support of the Authors who are featured on Saturday is for Sharing.

________________

Lynda McKinney Lambert. Copyright: September, 2018. All rights reserved.

Saturday is for Sharing

is a weekly series coordinated by Lynda and Miss Opal, her feline writing partner.  Lynda and Miss Opal live in rural western Pennsylvania in The Village of Wurtemburg.

Lynda is the author of 4 books:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage Buy it!

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems Buy it!

Lynda has just completed her 3rd book

Star Signs: New & Selected Poems – not yet published.

AND… her FIRST CHAPBOOK

first snow, 16 Poems with a Wintry Theme – Not yet published.

Both new books  are now available for publication. Editors, please contact Lynda for the manuscript.

 

Thank you for visiting with us today.

Miss Opal and Lynda McKinney Lambert

Your COMMENTS, QUESTIONS, and SUGGESTIONS are always welcome.

PLEASE SHARE by Re-Blogging this article on Social Media  I only require that you copy/past the entire blog post including our Copyright and blog information.

 

PLEASE share LK’s story and buy a copy of one of her books!

 

If you are a published AUTHOR or an actively exhibiting ARTIST – Miss Opal and Lynda  want YOUR STORY for our “Saturday is for Sharing” blog features. We spotlight one outstanding author or artist a week.

Right now, we are scheduling into the month of November.

E-mail us today: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 

Saturday is for Sharing

is brought to you by

Pennsylvania Author, Lynda McKinney Lambert and her feline writing partner, Miss Opal.

SCAN is owned by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

Saturday is for Sharing is Lynda’s property. You have permission to SHARE this blog post with your FRIENDS on FaceBook.

Copyright: September 8,, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Please share with your Friends on FaceBook and SHARE to your blog. Please Re-Blog this article and spread the HAPPINESS.

I only ask that you re-post the entire article with the copyright information attached.

Leave Miss  Opal and Lynda some comments and let us know what you liked about this feature story today.

 

SHARE Good Thoughts

and Happiness

EVERY day!

 

riverwoman@zoominternet.net

September 8, 2018

https://llambert363.blog/

Saturday is for Sharing – Bruce Atchison

Post #124 – September 8, 2018

Saturday is for Sharing

Series of Guest Authors – #9

Miss Opal & Lynda

Welcome YOU to

Saturday is for Sharing 

_____

Bruce Atchison, Canadian Author

 

 

  

Hi Bruce,   It is a pleasure to have you as a guest today on Saturday is for Sharing.  I’ve enjoyed reading your blog for several years and I also know you through the Behind Our Eyes organization.

You are our first international Guest Author.

I recommend your memoir

Deliverance From Jericho: Six Years in a Blind School

to our readers. I have this book and will quote from the back cover:

Imagine being a disabled child, hastily sent to a boarding school hundreds of miles from home, and being kept there for months at a time.  This was the fate of most physically and mentally impaired students half a century ago.  ntellectuals and governmaent  officials once believed  that the best way to educate “hadicapped youngsters” was to segregate them from the able-bodied population, concentrating those  pupils into large institutions. 

Bruce, I think this is a tremendous book and gives the reader a view into life as you experienced it during those years as a young child. This is a world at most people have never imagined and I found it to be enlightening and moving.

I have enjoyed speaking with you  about our mutual passion for animals, and I know that you are specifically passionate about  rabbits.  So, that’s where I will begin our interview – with a question about the awareness of animals.

___________

Q_ I  know that you have a favorite animal – rabbits!  Are rabbits  a “totem animal” to you?  When did you become aware of the importance of rabbits  in your life?  

Bruce_ I’ve always loved rabbits. They’re shy like me and they’re so picked on in nature. But sadly for our family rabbit, we killed her with kindness. That’s why I wrote my first memoir called

When a Man Loves a Rabbit

My first  book is  a warning to novice bunny owners.

 

In 1996, I found out about

The House Rabbit Society  (Lynda’s note – Learn More about Rabbits at this link:  https://rabbit.org/

and that rabbits can make wonderful house pets for adults. Their information confirmed some things I had already noticed with the rabbits I once had. For example, they like to toilet in one spot. Bunnies dislike chaotic situations but they are social creatures.

_____

 

 

Q_ I also know that you love music. I’ve enjoyed learning so much about a variety of musical genre by reading your blog posts. You give a sample of a piece of music and a performer or group that recorded the particular piece of music, Then, you give some background andhistorical context to that music. Your blog features are enjoyable to listen to,  also educational.  I would say you are a connosouire of modern music.  Do you have a favorite song that brings back good memories for you, Bruce?

 

Bruce_  When Klaatu released their first LP in 1997…

I fell in love with a song called “Little Neutrino.” It combined space rock and synthesizers, plus the vocoder vocals appealed to my love of science fiction.

I also named one of my rabbits after the song.

Neutrino was a feisty black bunny

who was very small and hard to see in dusky rooms.

He also had a knack of slipping through barriers I erected to keep him out of rooms which I hadn’t bunny proofed. Neutrino was three years old when I adopted him and we lived for eighty-two months together.

_____

Q_ What is one topic that you won’t ever choose to write about in the future? Is there something that is “off limits” to you, as a writer?

 In my book, My  Deliverance from Jericho…

Bruce_I told the story of how I was sent to a school for the blind. At age seven, I went there for months at a stretch and was raised by supervisors. I spent six years of my life in that uncaring institution before the government mainstreamed me and other Alberta children.

I learned the hard way that most people can’t relate to my experiences at that school.

My rabbit book was a relative success because I knew my readership. But I misjudged the interest of sighted readers, causing my Jericho book to sell poorly. Only fellow blind people wanted to read what I wrote. But since it cost too much to have the book made into audio or braille versions, and since most blind folks couldn’t afford to pay, few copies sold.

 

Q_ What  is on your “back burner” and waiting for your attention?

Bruce_I’m working on a new book called

You Think You’re Going to Heaven?

Many people who consider themselves Christians aren’t following Christ and have never obeyed him. They feel their good works and showing up at church will gain them entry into paradise but they’ll be turned away. I want every one to know the true way to eternal bliss.

 

My next book won’t be a  memoir. I made that mistake with my third book called How I Was Razed. Most folks don’t care about my experiences at a cultic house church. Even Christians weren’t eager to buy a copy of that book.

 

Q_ What do you have an eye on right now, for your future?

Bruce_I hope to retire in 2021. I’ll relax and enjoy life.

Note from Lynda:

Somehow I cannot imagine that Bruce would be retiring from the writing life. He seems to be an “Energizer Bunny” when it comes to ideas for book and publishing. Personally, I think he will go on, and on, and on….and we will see more books by him in the years ahead.  I surely hope so!

_____

Bio: Bruce Atchison lives in a tiny Alberta hamlet.

He is  almost blind, yet he has written three books and is writing a fourth. Bruce also writes freelance articles since 1997.

His blog posts appear three times a week.

www.bruceatchison.blogspot.com

AND

http://www.bruceatchison.wordpress.com

 

Bruce Atchison

 

batchison@mcsnet.ca

http://www.twitter.com/ve6xtc

http://www.youtube.com/ve6xtc

 

___________

 

_____________________

Dear Readers of SCAN,

Your support of our Featured Guest Authors is  appreciated.

Here’s how YOU can spread the HAPPINESS:

Please  share this article with your friends on Social Media and by Re-Blogging.

You can purchase this book: Gift Giving Season is closing in on us already!

Thanks again for your support of the Authors who are featured on Saturday is for Sharing.

________________

Saturday is for Sharing

is brought to you by

Pennsylvania Author, Lynda McKinney Lambert and her feline writing partner, Miss Opal.

SCAN is owned by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

Saturday is for Sharing is Lynda’s property. You have permission to SHARE this blog post with your FRIENDS on FaceBook.

Copyright: September 8,, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

Please share with your Friends on FaceBook and SHARE to your blog. Please Re-Blog this article and spread the HAPPINESS.

I only ask that you re-post the entire article with the copyright information attached.

Leave Miss  Opal and Lynda some comments and let us know what you liked about this feature story today.

 

SHARE Good Thoughts

and Happiness

EVERY day!

 

Thursday Treasures #5: Reading

July 12, 2018

Post #106

Thursday Treasures #5,  by Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

Note: For today’s Thursday Treasure, I went to my other blog, “Walking by Inner Vision,” Read it here!

I looked into my Archives at Walking by Inner Vision.  I started that blog in December 2009 because I wanted to find a way to communicate with others after my 2-year struggle to be able to use a computer again.

I was trying to recapture my life, after an unexpected  life-altering event.

Today, I’m  publishing an article I first published on February 19, 2010.  I’ve revised that essay  for my readers here at SCAN.

 

Reading: The Stuff of Life

I am reading

 The Power of Myth

by Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers.

This book was on my book shelves for a number of years. It is a larger book that is easily noticeable. I often picked it up and looked through it, waiting for a time when I could sit down and really learn from these two remarkable men.

 

???????????????????????????????

 

During my teaching years at Geneva College,

I often thought about what I would do

 

“When I RETIRE”

 

My profession required extensive reading. I loved to read and

I devoured books and periodicals like there was no tomorrow.

However, the reading I did for my courses was always centered around what I taught in my courses.

I longed for more  time to read outside my course materials and requirements.

I thought ,

Someday I will  be able to do that, when I retire.

I began working  towards that magical future time when I could read to my heart’s content with no goal of ever teaching the material. I wanted to  read  just for me. I would read to satisfy my inner longings. I would read for myself alone. I would read for the sheer joy of reading.

I prepared for my retirement, for years!

My book collection was a treasure  trove of books  gathered  & put on shelves in my home library.

The book treasures  awaited my day of liberation when I could begin reading them. I could spend my retirement days with a precious book in my hands, and have no concern about time or interruptions.  I imagined this new freedom, every day.

I anticipated the time when I no longer had to spend time on the road, traveling to classes, or taking trips for business purposes.

I would not have to organize classes or  take students on international study trips. And, no more endless meetings around a table, talking about strategies, evaluations and future plans for student development.

In my envisioned retirement, I would no longer write conference presentations, faculty reports,  or attend  professional development sessions.

I would merely be reading my accumulation of books from my library shelves. I’d be content.

 

My retirement collection contained books of poetry, art, and great literature  – many of the books are by authors I was not teaching in the classroom.

Some are by my favorite poets, and some are poets I want to read but never had time because of my intense teaching schedule. Of course, I had a collection of hundreds of books from which I created courses. But, my treasured books for retirement were different.

Each book, a treasure, carefully  selected and collected.  

 

What I did not  know was  that a CATASTROPHY  would STOP me COLD!

 Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

  changed my plans. I experienced sudden, permanent, and profound sight loss.

 

All of my  reading is now through technologies either on my computer or on a special machine provided to Blind and Handicapped  people. While I am thankful to be able to read this way, it is certainly not as satisfying as holding a real book in my hands – feeling it’s heft; its unique smell; and the sense of touch from my fingers on the binding or the page edges. And, listening to someone read the book takes away almost all of the quiet and personal imagination that is so much richer.  I will never get used to a professional voice reading a book to me. The voices inside my head, in my imagination, have been abducted by those voices on the machines. I hate it!

 

Despite all of my personal emotions at the drastic changes in how I read, I am still very thankful for  books provided as sound recordings by he National Library of Congress.  I am able to order a variety of books I would like to read, but the books by contemporary poets are quite few. I still love academic books by academics and in the poetry section they simply are not there!  The books from NLS come directly to my house and are sent through the postal service to  my mailbox.

 

Because I love the feel of a physical book, some days, I struggle to read one of my books by using a CCTV (Closed Circuit Television) which is a magnification device. I can only read a very small portion of text at a time, but I am grateful that I still have a small amount of vision so I can actually SEE some text.  I still love the feeling of a real book in my hands, even though my ability to read it as I sit on a comfortable sofa in my library is no longer possible. I’d give anything to snuggle with a quilt on a winter’s day with my book in my hands  and my mind and imagination taking flights of fancy.  There is no replacement for those delights. No machine can do it.

I am thankful for this retirement time  away from the bustle and frenzy that was my professional life up until ELEVEN  long years ago.

However, the loss of eye sight brought new vision to me and I can see some things I would never have known existed if I had not lost most of my sight.  My daily walk is quite different now. But, it is a precious life, nevertheless. I can hear nuances in a voice that tell me exactly what a person is thinking – not what they are saying. I am not distracted by their  expressions now.  I am far more aware of perceptions than I ever was when I had full sight.

As I edit this essay, my two dogs lay nearby and my 2 cats come into my office to sit in the open window each morning. We greet each day together, and it is a good life. My retirement is satisfying and I have even had the time to write books and poetry.  I just completed the work on my 3rd book,  a full-length book of poems,  (Star Signs: New and Selected Poems) and my first chapbook, first snow, is ready for publication, too.

As I write. my 2 dogs  are asleep nearby.  Our 2 cats spend a lot of time in my writing office and like to sit in the open window to survey their world.

Good books and contented dogs & cats bring joy to my life.

READING  is the stuff of MY life.

____________________

 

Thursday Treasures is brought to you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright July 12, 2018. All rights reserved.

SCAN is the sole property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Guest writers may not always reflect the opinions of Lynda Lambert, but this blog is designed to feature authors and artists who have a positive world view.

SCAN is a QUIET PLACE of Inspiration. We love all things ART, NATURE and Literature.

 

Miss Opal

 

Miss Opal and Lynda will

SHARE featured

AUTHORS & ARTISTS on

“Saturday is for Sharing” 

on SCAN

Click Here for SCAN

 

For MORE information on how YOU can be featured on “Saturday is for Sharing,” click on the instructions page at Read it!

https://llambert363.blog/lyndas-40-questions/

 

PLEASE SHARE THIS PAGE WITH OTHER AUTHORS  and ARTISTS ~

We are all about SHARING.

Scan Presents: Christmas in July

Scan

July 6, 2018

Christmas in July – a Song and a Poem

Every year  my sister, Patti, tends her flower gardens from early spring  to the first frosts of late autumn.  

As she took me on a tour of her flower beds  one afternoon, she grinned with pride when she pointed out her roses.  Every flower gardener I have ever known has loved their rose bushes and each one has shown tremendous pride in the beauty of the flowers on a rose bush.

 

Last  August, Patti  brought me a birthday bouquet she had created from her flower beds – and the prize flower in the bouquet was a very stunning pink  rose! I think no matter how much a gardener loves all the flowers they have blooming, it is the rose bushes that seem to elicit the most pride and happiness to them.  Roses are the dazzling queens of the flower bids.  They  seems to be the proverbial “icing on the cake.”

???????????????????????????????

***Photo by Lynda McKinney Lambert:

Patti’s Flowers on my Dining Room Table

Ah, yes, I contend that the rose is Queen of all Flowers!

I am certain of it! As you begin doing some research on the “rose” as an iconic image,  you will soon   find references to

Mary, the Queen of Heaven and Earth.

She is often depicted with a rose in her hand, or surrounded by roses.  Roses are used as garlands in art and sculpture and roses are used to encircle  the Queen of Heaven. Roses are a halo at times in Christian lore as well as in pre-Christian mythology.   Mary’s  son, Jesus Christ, is  symbolized as a rose.  King Solomon described Jesus  as  “the rose of Sharon.” You can find this particular reference in The Song of Solomon, 2:1. There are many other such references as well.

***

 In a popular  German Christmas song,

these  words are from an Eighteenth Century  poem by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe;

 “es ist ein Ros entsprungen.”  

This can be translated in English to

“A Rose has sprung.”

You may recognize this Christmas song as “Lo, How a Rose E’er  Blooming”  or “A Spotless Rose.”  This song is a Protestant  Christmas  Carol and a Catholic Marian hymn that originated in Germany.  I remember it from my childhood  when we all stood to sing carols together at the small  Methodist Church  in my village.

Listen to this song in English:

Click Here to listen

Click here SING ALONG with the music:  Yes, I want to sing a long!

 

***

I sat down to consider the pleasure of

a visit with my daughter, Ilsa

Below you will read a  poem about her visit and something we did together. Sometimes, it is unusual when we think of a child teaching a parent a lesson of some sort.  But, here in my poem, a daughter teaches  me a lesson  in a unique way.

This poem, “When My Daughter Cuts the Roses,”  marks the beginning of Advent in our home.  The bouquet of flowers on my dining room table today  reminds me  that now is the Season of Hope.  As I listen to the latest news from around the world, it feels like the  whole world is longing for hope right now – Oh, I know! It does appear the the entire planet is in deep distress.   The EARTH could be laboring  for the birth of HOPE.  Perhaps there is a longing for hope   in the souls of Earth’s people and all of NATURE.

On the First Week of Advent we can choose to keep our thoughts  and our  eyes focused on HOPE as we light that first candle.  

There is great beauty in the  symbols  of the weekly lighting of the Advent candles.   When the FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT comes this year,  we can pause to embrace the message  of the ROSE  and the  coming of the LIGHT, who  is promised from ancient times.  

 

Ah, yes!  As  I complete the writing of this essay, I am hearing a tune in my mind.

 This Flower, whose fragrance tender with sweetness fills the air,
Dispels with glorious splendor the darkness everywhere;
True man, yet very God, from sin and death He saves us,
And lightens every load.

(Final stanza of “Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming)

***

  “When my Daughter Cuts the Roses”

My daughter looked

At the bouquet of fresh roses

noticed two of them were drooping.

“Let me show you how to trim the roses

so they stay fresh and strong.” she said.

Her hands held the roses firmly

one-by-one, trimmed off extra leaves

“These will make the water stink,” she said.

She found scissors in the drawer

put the roses in a bowl of tepid water

held each stem under water

sliced them all, diagonally –

“As I cut the rose under the water,

little bubbles of air come to the surface.

Now, when the rose inhales

it will only breathe water into it,

it won’t fill up with air.

The living water inside the stems

gives longer life to each rose.”

She carried the freshened flowers

In the tall glass vase

back to the center of the dining room table

darkest crimson buds, sunny yellow petals,

deep green fern leaves

and a frilly white carnation.

***

 

This essay & poem is brought to you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Lynda is the author of 4 books:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage Buy it!

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems Buy it!

Lynda has just completed her 3rd book

Star Signs: New & Selected Poems

AND… her FIRST CHAPBOOK

first snow, 16 Poems with a Wintry Theme.

Both new books  are now available for publication. Editors, please contact Lynda for the manuscript.

 

Thank you for visiting with us today.

Miss Opal and Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

 

Contact Lynda & Miss Opal at:  riverwoman@zoominternet.net

Your COMMENTS, QUESTIONS, and

SUGGESTIONS are always welcome.

PLEASE SHARE by Re-Blogging this article on Social Media.

 

If you are a published AUTHOR or an actively exhibiting ARTIST – Miss Opal and I want YOUR STORY for our “Saturday is for Sharing” blog features.

 

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems being published.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

this blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright April 29, 2018.

Copyright July 6, 2018.  Revised.

Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

I welcome your COMMENTS and I love it when you Re-Blog my posts!

Please share with all your friends.

Thanks you

Saturday is for Sharing – Musings on Saturday Morning

 

Saturday is for Sharing

 Saturday Musings ~

on the LAST DAY OF JUNE, 2018

Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

 

An essay by Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

Walk dogs – Check!

Morning Coffee – Check!

Open window for Miss Opal – Check!

Read E-mail – Check!

 

Miss Opal is my feline writing companion.

She is seated on top of my file cabinet, watching intently out the open window as she does each morning.  Like all cats, she is intrigued by the bird sounds and life passing by on this rural western Pennsylvania road. We begin our days before dawn. We rise with the crows and the red-tailed hawks that soar over the landscape outside our window. 

 

Next Saturday, I will present my first Guest Author on “Saturday is for Sharing.”

That is exciting because I have some stellar authors lined up for this new adventure.  You will love meeting my guests!

 

I am so interested in the responses to the questions I ask my guests.

Reading them and working on the articles caused me to do some musing on my own thoughts about what I do as a visual  artist and a writer/author. I work across disciplines in everything I do.

 

First, I considered my own challenge –

I am a blind person.

 

Unlike some other artists and writers who are challenged with a handicap or disability, I have never written much about the sudden sight loss that I experienced eleven years ago.

 

I was at the height of a wonderful career and my personal life was fantastic the year I turned sixty-four.

 

I worked out at the gym 6-7 days a week. My body was so healthy and I felt so good in my skin. Hi energy! Excited about life! Living my passions! High Achiever!

 

Other pleasures-

  • My teaching schedule at Geneva College (Beaver Falls, PA)). It was a career that I loved. My courses included lecturing and teaching in the Humanities, Fine Art Studio classes, and special courses in English literature.

  • My studies and teaching extended to include a month-long course I taught while living in Europe every summer. I wrote and drew in my sketchbook every day as I traveled.

  • My first book, Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage developed from my sketchbook jottings and drawings. Life was a grand adventure.

  • In my artist’s life, I was having exhibitions all over the world and had done so since 1976. Literature and art are my passions.  I was so blessed to be living my dream.

 

In a day, that all ended.  While I say it ended, what really happened is that it all changed dramatically when I lost my vision due to Ischemic Optic Neuropathy.  How does a person pick up the pieces and move on, when it seems that you have lost everything you have in your life?  The answer is one that comes slowly – over time. The answer unravels, day by day, year after year.  It has now been eleven years since my own personal disaster stopped me cold.

 

When I thought I was finished

and my life was over – 

I was mistaken!

 

I’ve moved on in my art making to new places where I might never have gone without the sight loss. However, I realize now that my mind was going into uncharted territory before the sight loss.

 

In my writing life, I have written about sight loss by creating some essays about individual works of art that I created after I began to recover. I had intense rehabilitation training – but it took a few years for me to be able to do art work again.

 

I realized that I do not want to be represented by blindness. It was not my choice and I will never embrace it. I will never “get over it.”

I seldom say that I am blind because I don’t want to be viewed through that lens.

But there! I have spoken about what I think of this disability.

I am blind.

  • Yet, I write books.
  • Yet, I make fine art.
  • Yet, I walk by INNER VISION, not SIGHT
  • Yet,  my art is in international exhibitions.
  • Yet, I win awards for my art and writing.
  • Yet, my  life is active and wholesome.

Yet, I have a voice and I will use that voice to speak through literature and art.

All’s well.

Though I walk in cloudy mists and shadow…

 

Yet, I walk!

 

 

Today, as I read the comments that one of my physically challenged guests wrote to me, I began to think more about my own visual challenges.

 

I know some visitors to my blog will read this story and will be inspired and encouraged, to face their own life situations no matter what they are.  I want you to know we all give a voice to what we all deal with every day.

 

Some of us offer hope & insight with our words.

Some of us speak to the world through our works of art.

Some of us write extensively and create works of art also.

However, we choose to do it, we put a voice to our thoughts in our creative works.

 

If you were to scratch down through the surface of me, you will find that  I am an artist at the core, and my writing evolves from art – and art-related ideas. My writing is created as I would create a work of art – in many layers.  These days, in my writing studio, I am layering words and images as I paint the pictures that come through in poetry and non-fiction essays.

 

You are not a disability.

You are not a handicap.

You are courage personified.

The world needs to hear what you have to say.

 

____________________

“Saturday is for Sharing is created by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright June 30, 2018. All Rights Reserved.

 

PLEASE pass this message along to you friends today.

Please comment at the end of this message. Please re-blog.

Thank you for visiting with me today. Happy Final Saturday of June, 2018.

All;s Well!

Visit me:  www.lyndalambert.com

 

Read more stories by Lynda Lambert at:

http://www.llambert363.blog

 

Author:

Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage: Poems, Kota Press, 2003

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems, DLD Books, 2017

first snow : Chapbook. Manuscript completed and ready to send to editors for publication.

Star Signs: New & Selected Poems.  Manuscript completed and ready to send to editors for publication.

Editors: contact me for information & viewing.

My Author’s Page:  http://www.dldbooks.com/lyndalambert

 

 

Friday Favorites – William’s Red Roses

June 15, 2017

“William’s Red Roses”

 

Friday Favorites —

William’s Red Roses

RedRoses9_June15_2014_3

 

A Favorite Story

from the book

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems

by Lynda McKinney Lambert

 

This weekend is Father’s Day.

 

Father’s Day  holds a bittersweet  memory of my relationship with my own father, William McKinney (1916 – 1988).

The story begins on page 45 in my book,

Walking by Inner Vision: Stories & Poems. DLD Books, 2017.. 

From the beginning, when I first wrote this story, it  is a favorite story.

Continue reading

Thursday Travels

Post #80

May 16, 2018

Thursday Travels:  Venice, Italy

I sat on a bench and drew  in my sketchbook.

My annual weekends in Venice were nearly always in July.  I came to celebrate Redentore Festival.

Link to Redentore Festival, 2018 schedule

I was usually outside on the streets most of the day when I was in Venice. There is so much to see and enjoy. I didn’t want to miss a bit of it.

  I enjoyed watching the city come to life each day.

There is a feeling you have in Venice that is different than any place I’ve ever visited.  Elegance, history, and beauty surround you any time of day or night.

First, the street sweepers  arrived before dawn.

They begin cleaning the streets of  accumulations from the day and night before. Each morning  the streets are renewed by a team of street sweepers.  They work quickly and I love watching them. This morning ritual was like watching a lyrical dance on a stage.

Next, the people who live in  the buildings that surround the campos arrive.

Some scurry off to work; others are opening their shops; some to church services; others, to sit quietly and talk toge.  You have the feeling that this activity has not hcanged over the centuries – it is a ritual of awakening each day in such an historic place.

I always carried my sketchbook with me on my excursions. 

I sketched; wrote poems; snapped photos. 

This photo captures life in Venice, Italy. 

PHOTO:  The 2 Venetian women never saw me sitting nearby  for they were absorbed in conversation.

This is their  hood.

___________

Thank you for visiting my SCAN blog today!

How I appreciate all of you!

This essay and photograph is brought to you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems being published.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

this blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright May 17, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Thursday Treasures_#1_My Favorites

Thursday  Treasures #1

My FPersonal avorites

 In Which I  Discover a TREASURE.  

#1 in my Series: Thursday Treasures

 

  Let me ask you:

Do you want to make changes in your life?

  • Are you becoming aware that some individuals or a groups you may be around  no longer serve you in a positive and life-affirming way?
  • Do your encounters with them leave you feeling encouraged appreciated?           Or is it the opposite?

Do your friends or close associates  spur your to:

  • do your finest work?
  • think your highest thoughts?
  • grow  beyond your wildest dreams?
  • flourish and blossom?

Have you outgrown your flowerpot? Click here!

YOU are a TREASURE.

Be the person God created you to be.   Shine!

You already know

what you need to do.

 

DSC08504.jpg

 

I bought a few new flowerpots recently.

Some of my succulent plants were too crowded into  old pots.

They will grow much nicer now that they are in the beautiful new green flowerpots!

Dig yourself up out of that old flower-pot

that no longer holds your expanding roots,

Transplant yourself into a beautiful, large, new flowerpot

that will provide ample room and opportunities for

your exciting new growth.

 

Tuesday’s Treasure:

Spring is here and NOW  is your time to FLOURISH.

Untangle yourself from the grasping weeds that are trying to choke you!

Let me know how this works for you!

__________

Thursday Treasures

is shared with  you by the author, Lynda McKinney Lambert.

View Publications Page for updates on my stories and poems in recent publications.

Walking by Inner Vision.

Lynda’s Author ‘s Page

This blog post is the property of Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright May 8, 2018. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

 

PLEASE SHARE this blog post.. SHARE  the HAPPINESS!

PLEASE, Re-Blog to your friends on SOCIAL MEDIA.

Just SCAN it!

Just  SCAN It!

SCAN: A blog

written by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

A quiet Place of Inspiration – We Love Literature!

 

 In 2018, I AM ABIDING 

WHAT DOES it mean

~ to abide?

This is my ONE WORD for 2018.  I won’t be doing anything in a RUSH. I’m taking my TIME and WAITING to publish  special articles that will encourage you and lift your spirit.

I’ll SHARE  thoughtful articles and I’ll share the work of other notable writers, editors, authors, and artists on my pages.

Thank you for visiting with us today.

SCAN (the blog) ~ created

by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

 

Why call the blog, SCAN?

Let’s have a LOOK at the word SCAN.

 SCAN  is a verb and a noun

Definition of scan for English Language Learners

  • : to look at (something) carefully usually in order to find someone or something

  • : to look over or read (something) quickly

  • : to look at the inside of (something) by using a special machine

I am a visual artist and author who is visually impaired. Everything I do depends on the use  of equipment that is developed for BLIND and VISUALLY IMPAIRED users.

 

Scan

(quoted from dictionary dot com)

 

14 Definitions of the word, SCAN:

 

verb (used with object), scanned, scanning.

1.

to glance at or over or read hastily:

to scan a page. 

The purpose of this blog will be to TAKE A LONGER LOOK at LITERATURE, AUTHORS, BOOKS, ARTISTS, and ART. We love LITERATURE and ART here at SCAN. 

to examine the particulars or points of minutely; scrutinize.

3.

to peer out at or observe repeatedly or sweepingly, as a large expanse;survey.

4.

to analyze (verse) as to its prosodic or metrical structure; read or recite(verse) so as to indicate or test the metrical form.

5.

to read (data) for use by a computer or computerized device, especially usingan optical scanner.

6.

Television. to traverse (a surface) with a beam of light or electrons in order toreproduce or transmit a picture.

7.

Radar. to traverse (a region) with a beam from a radar transmitter.

verb (used without object), scanned, scanning.

8.

to examine the meter of verse.

9.

(of verse) to conform to the rules of meter.

10.

Television. to scan a surface or the like.

SCAN as a noun

11..

an act or instance of scanning; close examination.

12..

a visual examination by means of a television camera, as for the purpose ofmaking visible or relaying pictures from a remote place:

a satellite scan of the dark side of the moon; video scans of property listingsavailable to customers.

13.

a particular image or frame in such video observation or a photograph made from it.

14.

a blog written by Lynda McKinney Lambert

 Meet Miss Opal. She is my writing companion and together WE SCAN the BEST BOOKS and INVITE the BEST AUTHORS to TELL THEIR STORIES on our blog, SCAN. 

IF YOU are an AUTHOR with a recently published book – in the past 2 years –

 

Miss Opal & Lynda

want you to tell your story

on SCAN.

Visit our INVITATION PAGE to learn more about how YOU can be our special guest on

“Saturday is for SHARING” feature.

Click Here to get your INVITATION NOW

Contact Lynda and Miss Opal at:  riverwoman@zoominternet.net

 

 

 

 

_____

Brought to you by Lynda McKinney Lambert.

Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

Visit me at Lynda Lambert’s Website

Find my latest book at 

My Authors Page.

 

The Connie

The Connie

by Lynda McKinney Lambert

July 9, 2016

 

 

 

High humidity and stifling heat on this July afternoon begins to urge me to dream of the month ahead. I admit it! I love late August days even more because they signify the approaching end of summer.

When nights become cooler I’ll begin to forget the predictable, unrelenting steamy days and nights of July. Temperature readings by mid-August will drop down into the 50s. I’ll open the windows; feel the cool breeze move through the familiar old house. July’s humidity and stuffiness will be swept away from the house and my thoughts when I begin to sense the shift of a quickly approaching change of seasons. My senses begin to stir my imagination today. There is something brewing in the atmosphere as I stand in the mid-day sunshine and look at the landscape all around me. I see every imaginable hue of green. Is it a sort of nervousness and anticipation for…what? I cannot readily say. But I get excited and anxious for the coming of August every year.

Last night I lay in my bed, listening to the soothing insect sounds drifting upwards to my open window. Unseen creatures sounded like the tuxedo-clad musicians I have listened to as they tuned their instruments before the concert began to play. Right now, it is night songs that I hear coming from below the window. The sounds blend into a nocturnal symphony, a cacophony of a summer serenade. In my meandering thoughts, I wonder if perhaps it was on a night like this one that Mozart had the first inklings of a tune that would become “Eine Kleine Nauchtmusik.” I paused for a moment and shifted my thoughts to the sounds of that familiar music.

Our century-old home is located on a ridge overlooking an ancient, winding creek that meanders for fifty miles through western Pennsylvania. People from this area call it “The Connie.” Its actual   name is the Connoquenessing creek. The arrival of people, who settled eventually in the Village of Wurtemburg, began arriving in America in the early 1700s. That is the time period when settlers from this area traveled to Germanic lands to recruit artisans to come to America and settle here. They needed skilled workers for the settlements and for over one-hundred years Germans were recruited to come to Pennsylvania. Skilled crafts and tradesmen were necessary for the survival of the settlements. My own ancestors were recruited during that one-hundred year period and arrived on ships that landed in Philadelphia. When descendants of the first Germanic people begin to do research they are often quite surprised to discover some of their ancestors married Indians who were already living in this area during the 18th Century. The Connie has been an axis of our own community history for generations. As is true for all people, we are forever tinged with history and that history is a part of our present day lives. The Connie is part of our shared communal memoir.

 

 

Photo16_TheConnie_1In the summer time, the Connie comes alive with the voices and sounds of the local “Crick Culture.” That’s what Western Pennsylvania people call it. We find that different activities take place during each season along The Connie. And here is where my own life story converges with the flowing waters of The Connie.

Kayaking begins in earnest in late winter as soon as the ice begins to dissipate. Hearty enthusiasts will continue to ride the rapids through the summer days in into the fall season. The Connie’s whitewater rapids provide the perfect setting for a swift course for kayakers to perfect their skills. Often, a slollum line will be threaded back and forth across the creek and the brave kayakers will spend the weekend honing skills when the water is high and fast.  Here is where they can learn how to avoid rocks and dangerous areas to complete the course. Later, they will move on to the most dangerous waters of West Virginia.

On summer nights I can hear people laughing from down below the ridge. People arrive at the “crick” in the late evening, in the twilight, just before it gets dark. They park their cars or trucks   under the old trees. Generations of local people come to spend the night fishing. I often watch as they pull out their gear. They bring coolers and jugs, flashlights, buckets of worms, fishing poles, nets, and blankets. Most of them wear baseball caps. One by one, they quietly scramble down the steep, rocky path that leads to the deep water below.  This is the place where another creek, the Slippery Rock Creek, converges with The Connie. We local folks refer to this part of the creek as, “the point.” Many myths are perpetuated about the depth of the waters at the Point, and the terrible whirlpools that lie hidden beneath the placid surface. It is here at the Point, where the night time fishermen like to come to spend the night in hopes of taking home fresh fish for breakfast.  On a still night, I hear them talking softly off in the distance. Their voices merge with the insect concert.

In childhood memories my father and I are in the back yard behind our home in the foothills. I still live in the valley between the steep hills.  Like most of the steelworkers in our village, my father loved to go fishing in the Connie. In the darkness of a sweltering summer night, I helped him find earth worms.  His steelworker’s helmet had a strange yellow light on the front of it.  I smelled the acrid smoke, heard it sizzle and sputter as we bent over the dark ground.  We poured mustard water down into the little tunnels where the earthworms lived.  In just a few seconds, a worm came to the surface seeking fresh air and we grabbed that earthworm, dipped it into a bucket of clean, warm water to rinse the mustard off of it.  Finally, we put our captured worms into Dad’s metal pail with the holes in the sides. He had put dirt into the pail before we went searching for the worms. We turned over rocks and found creepy creatures hiding under them. Dad called them helgramites and they made me shiver when I looked at them.

Throughout my childhood, The Connie was the place where we went swimming as soon as spring arrived. But, The Connie can be treacherous after a day of rainfall. On such a spring day in early May, I ventured into the raging water in a swimming place called, “Mitchell’s.” I only had to take a couple of strokes to reach the big rock and that was my intention when I plunged into the water. Instantly, I was swept away from the big rock. An older boy was at the creek swimming that day and he was a lifeguard. Somehow, he grabbed my hair and pulled me to the rocky shore. There is no doubt in my mind that my life would have ended in The Connie that day if the other swimmer had not been there. I, too, would have been one of the unfortunate victims of The Connie. While The Connie is beautiful and refreshing, she is also vicious and raging at times.

 

Nearly every summer there have been accidents on the banks of the Connie near my home. We know when we hear the ambulance arriving in this area, they are most likely going to find that someone has drowned in The Connie, or at least been injured. I often wonder how many people have lost their lives in The Connie and I say a prayer of “thanks” for my own rescue when I was fifteen years old. Photo15_Connie1_March25_2015

 

Our children grew up beside The Connie, too.  In their adult years they often relate stories of their own experiences and mishaps and they usually have many tales to reminisce about their childhood swimming and floating excursions in inner tubes down the creek on hot days.

 

Not only was The Connie my favorite place to explore in warm weather, it was also my first encounter with ice skating. We carried a broom to the creek and swept off a large area to remove the snow from the icy surface. Even with such careful preparations, it was a rough and uneven place to skate. That never mattered though, and there were many winter days when we walked on the ice for miles. The Connie snapped and crackled as we walked on her surface but we never even considered that we might fall into the water or even something worse.

By the end of June, the banks along The Connie are changing rapidly in their appearance. Early July is when the foliage looks soft and fragile looking with the first blooms of the Queen Anne’s lace and some varieties of sweetly scented bushes with tender little white flowers.Photo16_QueenAnneLace_The Connie July 9

 

I stop to take a deep breath, smell those flowers, and watch the tiny bees gathering all around them. It’s like looking at a whole world of mysteries, to look into those delicate flowers. The most elegant flower gardens in this world are the ones planted by the birds and bees, and growing wild and free along the roadsides and meadows. Here is where we find the glory of nature. This, surely, is what the first inhabitants in the Garden of Eden must have experienced. Breathtaking beauty!

M y favorite sight in August is the Queen Ann Lace mingled with the periwinkle blue flowers of Chicory. The two wild flowers grow together along all the roads in early August.  I take my camera outside so I can capture the beauty of these disorderly flowers.  I remember the fields of these uncultivated flowers long after they disappear for the winter.

 

Oh, I should let you know, Queen Ann Lace is my favorite flower because of the delicate tiny flowers clustered on thin, celadon green stems. The flowers seem to float in space and ride the soft wafts of the August breeze.  Fragile lace blossoms dance in the fragrant afternoon air.  The white blossoms of the Queen Ann Lace contrast with the sturdier chicory flowers.  Chicory resembles a daisy with petals branching outward from around, dark, center.  Each Chicory bloom has little oval petals that come to a tip that looks like someone snipped it off, flat, with zig-zag pinking shears.   The brilliant blue color of the Chicory seems to pop out from among the white Queen Ann Lace in full bloom side by side with Chicory. When I see the Chicory begin to bloom, I know that the season will soon be changing to autumn.

And, it always seems that it won’t be long before I’ll be shuffling my feet through the colored leaves on my daily walks through the woods, along the Connie. My thoughts drift to the stories my father told me about his Indian grandmother. I stop and look around through the woods, and down to the white-water creek. Some days my spirit calls out to her as I look around in this same rural world that she lived in, too. Often, I have a keen insight while walking along The Connie. I step slowly over layers and generations of my family members. I ask myself, “Am I an overlay from past generations of people who lived in this place?” I realize their presence because they surround me. I can feel them. Today, I asked my grandmother, “Did your feet walk on this path, too?”

Copyright, July 9, 2016. Lynda McKinney Lambert. All rights reserved.

__________

Lynda’s Bio:

Lynda McKinney Lambert is a Christian author, blogger, visual artist. She is the author of the book of essays and poetry, “Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage”  by Kota Press. She is a  retired Professor of Fine Arts and Humanities from Geneva College, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania.

Lynda earned  BFA and  MFA degrees  in Fine Arts;  MA in English Literature. She has traveled and taught courses in writing and art, internationally.

Lynda specializes in writing poetry and creative non-fiction. Currently she has three books in development for publication in late-2016 and 2017. Her stories, essays and poems appear in many anthologies and literary magazines.

Photo16_Bio_Portrait in Red and Orange

 

Lynda’s 2 blogs:

“Walking by Inner Vision” Link:  Walking by Inner Vision Blog
“SCANdalous – Recollections” Link:  SCANdalous – Recollections Blog
Contact Lynda:  riverwoman@zoominternet.net